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Rend'ring faint quittance', wearied and out- To stormy passion, must perforce decay. breath'd,

[down You caft the event of war, my noble lord, To Harry Monmouth; whose swift wrath beat And fumm’Ithe account of chance, before you said, The never-daunted Percy to the earth,

Let us make head. It was your pre-surmise, From whence with life he never more sprung up. That, in the dole of blows s your son might drop: In few, his death (whose spirit lent a fire You knew, he walk'd o'er perils, on an edge Even to the dullett peasant in his camp)

More likely to fall in, than to get o'er : Being bruited once, took fire and heat away You were advis'd, his fiefh was capable From the best temper'd courage in his troops : Of wounds, and scars; and that his forward spirit For from his metal was his party steel'd; Would lift him where most trade of danger rang'd; Which once in him abated ?, all the rest

Yet did you say,--Go forth; and none of this, Turnd on themselves, like dull and heavy lead. Though trongly apprehended, could restrain And as the thing that's heavy in itself,

The stiff-borne action : What hath then befallen, Upon enforcement, flies with greatest speed; Or what hath this bold enterprize brought forth, So did our men, heavy in Hotípur's loss,

More than that being which was like to be?
Lend to this weight such lightness with their fear, Bard. We all, that are engaged to this loss,
That arrows fled not swifter toward their aim, Knew that we ventur'd on such dangerous seas,
Than did our soldiers, aiming at their fafety, That, if we wrought out life, 'twas ten to one :
Fly from the field : then was that noble Worcester And yet we ventur'd, for the gain propos'd
Too foon ta'en prisoner : and that furious Scot, Choak'd the respect of likely peril fear'd;
The bloodly Douglas, whose well-labouring sword And, since we are o'er-let, venture again.
Had three times llain the appearance of the king, Come, we will all put forth; body, and goods.
'Gan vail his stomach, and did grace the shame Mort. 'Tis more than time : And, my most
Of those that turn'd their backs; and, in his Aight,

noble lord,
Stumbling in fear, was took. The sum of all 'I hear for certain, and do speak the truth,-
Is, that the king hath won; and hath sent out The gentlé archbishop of York is up,
A speedy power, to encounter you, my lord, With well appointed powers ; he is a man,
Under the conduct of young Lancaster,

Who with a double surety binds his followers, And Westmoreland : this is the news at full. My lord your fon had ouly but the corps,

North. For this I shall havetime enough to mourn. But thadows, and the shews of men, to fight :
In poison there is phyfick; and these news For that same word, rebellion, did divide
Having been well, that would have made me sick, The action of their bodies from their souls ;
Being sick, have in some measure made me well: And they did fight with quealiness, constrain'd,
And as the wretch, whose fever-weaken'd joints, As men drink potions ; that their weapos only
Like strengthless hinges, buckle 4 under life, Seem'd on our vide, but for their fpirits and fouls,
Impatient of his fit, breaks like a fire

This word, rebellion, it had frize them .),
Out of his keeper's arms; even fo my limbs, As fish are in a pond : But now the bishop
Weaken’d with grief, being nowenrag'd with grief, Turns insurrection to religion :
Are thrice themselves : hence therefore, thou nice Suppos'd sincere and holy in his thoughts,
crutch;

He's follow'd both with body and with mind;
A scruly gauntlet now, with joints of steel, And cloth enlarge his rising with the blood
Mutt glove this hand: and hence, thou fickly quoif; of fair king Richard, scrap'd from Pomfret stones:
Thou art a guard too wanton for the head, Derives from heaven his quarrel, and liis cause;
Which princes, flesh'd with conquest, aim to hit. Tells them, he doth bestride a bleeding lando,
Now bind my brows with iron : And approach Gasping for life under great Bolingbroke;
The rugged'st hour that time and spight dare bring, And more and less 7 do fuck to follow him.
To frown upon the enrag'd Northumberland! Nortb. I knew of this before; but, to speak
Let heaven kiss earth! Now let not nature's hand

fruth, Keep the wild flood confin'd! let order die ! This present grief had wip'd it from my mind. And let this world no longer be a Itage,

Go in with me; and counte! erery muun To feel contention in a lingering act;

The aptent way for fafety, and revenge : But let one ipirit of the first-born Cain

Get poits, and letters, and make friends with speed; Reign in all bofoms, that, each beart being set Never 10 few, and never yet more need. [Fxcuni. Ou biody cou ses, the rude scene may end,

S CE N E II. And darknets be the burier of the dead ! (my lord :

A fizet in London. . Bird. This strained pafton dotis you wrong, Enter $1. John F.:!!ief; with his page bearing bis Swett Carl, divorce not wildom from your honour.

jeword vind buckler. Mo't. The lives of all your loving complices

Fal. Siiral, you giant! what says the doctor to Lean on your health; the which, if you give o'er

my Water?

i Quitture is return. By faint juistance is nicant a fiint return of blows. 2 i. e. reduced to a lower tempir, or, as it is usually calied, lei duen. j i. c. began to fall his courage, to let his lpiriis link under liis fortune. 4 i. é. bend, yield to pressure. 5 The dole of blows is the distorz'inn of blous; Hile originally signifying the portion of alms (consiiting either of mcat or money) given a w od ai the door of a noleman.

* That is, stands over his counity io difend her as lhe lies bleeding on the ground. 7 i. Co ereader and lefs.

Page. He said, fir, the water itself was a good a horse in Smithfield: if I could get me but a wise healthy water : but, for the party that owed it, he in the itews, I were mann'd, hors'u, and wit'd might have more diseases than he knew for.

Enter the Lord Chief Iuftice, and Servants. Fal. Men of all forts take a pride to gird ' ai Page. Sir, here comes the nobleman that comme : The brain of this foolish-compounded clay, mitted the prince for Striking him about Barman, is not able to invent any thing that tends to dolph. laughter, more than I invcnt, or is invented on me : Fal. Wait close, I will not see him. I am not only witty myself, but the cause that Ch. Juf. What's he that goes there? wit is in other men. I do here walk before thee, Serv. Falstaff, an't please your loruthip. like a fow, that hath overwhelmed all her litter Ch. Juf. He that was in question for the robbut one.

If the prince put thce into my service bery? for any other reason than to set ine off, why then I Sery. He, my lord: but he hath fince done have no judgement. Thou whoreron 2. mandrake, good icrvice at Shrewsbury; and, as I hear, is thou art fitter to be worn in my car, than to wait now going with some charge to the lord John of at my heels. I was never mann'd 3 with an agate Lancaster. 'aill now : but I will neither set you in gold nor Cb. Jufi. What, to York? Call him back silver, but in vile apparel, and send you back again again. to your master, for a jewel ; the juvenal 4, the Serv. Sir John Falstaff ! prince your master, whose chin is not yet fledg'd. Fal. Boy, tell him I am deaf. I will sooner have a beard grow in the palm of my Page. You must speak louder, my master is hand, than he shall get one on his cheek ; yet he deaf. will not Itick to say, his face is a face-royal. Hea Cb. Juf. I am sure he is, to the hearing of any ven may finish it when he will, it is not a hair thing good. -Go, pluck him by the elbow; I amiss yet : he may keep it still as a face-royal, for must speak with him. a barber shall never earn fixpence out of its ; and Suro. Sir John, yet he will be crowing, as if he had writ man ever Fal. What ! a young knave, and beg! Is there since his father was a batchelor. He may keep his not wars ? is there not employment Doth not own grace, but he is almost out of mine, I can al- the king lack subjects : do not the rebels want sure him. -What said master Dombledon about soldiers . Though it be a shame to be on any fide the fattin for my hort cloak, and Nops?

but one, it is worse shame to beg than to be on Page. He said, fir, you should procure him bet- the worst side, were it worse than the name of ter assurance than Bardolph: he would not take his rebellion can tell how to make it. borid and yours ; he lik'd not the security.

Sov. You mistake me, fir. Fal. Let him be damn'd like the glutton! may Fal. Why, sir, did I say you were an honest his tongue be hotter !-A whoreson Achitophel! man? Setting my knighthood and my foldierthip a rascally yea-forsooth knave! to bear a gentleman afide, I had lied in my throat if I had faid fo. in hand", and then stand upon security !--The Serv, I pray you, sir, then let your knighthood whoreson smooth-pates do now wear nothing but and your soldiership aside ; and give me leave to high fhoes, and bunches of keys at their girules; tell you, you lie in your throat, if you say I am and if a man is thorough with them in honest any other than an honest man. taking up, then they must stand upon-security. 1 Ful. I give thee leave to tell me so ! I lay afide had as lief they would put ratsoane in my mouth, that which grows to me! If thoạ get'st any leave as offer to stop it with security. I look'd he should of me, hang me; if thou tak ft leave, thou wert have sent me two-and-twenty yards of fattin, as I better be hang'd: You hunt-counter 10, hence ! am a true knight, and he sends me security. Well, avaunt ! he may neep in security ; for he hath the horn of Serv. Sir, my lord would speak with you. abundance, and the lightness of his wife shines Cb. Yuji. Sir John Falstaff, a word with you. through it : and yet cannot he see, though he have Fal. My good lord ! _God give your Jordihir his own lanthorn to light him. -Where's good time of day. I am glad to see your loruthip Burdolph?

abroad: I heard say, your lordship was fick : ļ Page. He's gone into Smithfield to buy your hope, you lordship goes abroad by advice. Your worship a horse.

lordship, though not clean past your youth, hath Fal. I bought him in Paul's 8, and he'll buy melyet some smack of age in you, some relish of the

young man.

1 i. c. to gibe. 2 Mandrake is a root supposed to have the shape of a man. 3 That is, I never before had an agate for my man,

Our author alludes to the little figures cut in agates, and other hard Itones, for seals; and therefore Falstaff says, I will set you neither in gold nor filver. 4 i. e. the

5 Mr. Steevens thinks, “this quibbling allusion is to the Englith real, rial, or royal; and that the poet seems to mean, that a barber can no more earn fixpence by his face-royal, than by the face stamped on the coin called a royal; the one requiring as little shaving as the other."

6 That is, to keep a gentleman in expectation. 7 To be thorough seems to be the same with the present phrale to be in with (in debt; a tradesman. 8 At that time the refort of idle people, cheats, and knights of the post. 9 This judge was Sir William Gascoigne, chief justice of the king's-bench, He died December 17, 1413, and was buried in Harwood church, in Yorkshire, 40 That is, blunderes.

falyers

faltness of time ; and I most humbly beseech your Fal. To wake a wolf, is as bad as to smell a fox. lordship, to have a reverend care of your health. Cb. Juft. What ! you are as a candle, the better Ch. Juft

. Sir John, I sent for you before your part burnt out. expedition to Shrewsbury.

Fal. A waffel 2 candle, my lord; all tallow : Fal. If it please your lordship, I hear his ma- but if I did say of wax, my growth would approve jefty is return'd with some discomfort from Wales. the truth.

Ch. Jujt. I talk not of his majesty : -You Ch. Juft. There is not a white hair on your face, would not come when I sent for you.

but should have his effect of gravity. Fal. And I hear moreover, his highness is fallen Fal. His effect of gravy, gravy, gravy. into this fame whoreson apoplexy.

Ch. Fuft. You follow the young prince up and Ch. Juft. Well, heaven mend him! I pray, let down, like his ill angel. me speak with you.

'Fal. Not fu, my lord; your ill angel is light ; Fal. This apoplexy is, as I take it, a kind of but, I hope, he that looks upon me, will take me lethargy, an't please your lordship; a kind of without weighing : and yet, in fome respects, I Deeping in the blood, a whoreson tingling. grant, I cannot go, I cannot tell 3 : Virtue is of

Cb. Jufi. What tell you me of it? be it as it is. fo little regaru in these coster-monger times +, that

Fal. I hath its original from much grief ; from true valour is turn'd bear-herd : Pregnancy s is study, and perturbation of the brain : I have read made a tapster, and hath his quick wit watted in the cause of his effects in Galen; it is a kind of giving reckonings : all the other gifts appertinent deafness.

to man, as the malice of this age shapes them, are Cb. Juft. I think, you are fallen into the disease; not worth a gooseberry. You, that are old, confor you hear not what I lay to you.

lider not the capacities of us that are young ; you Fal. Very well, my lord, very well : rather, measure the heat of our livers with the bitterness an't please you, it is the disease of not listening, the of your galls: and we that are in the vaward of our malady of not marking, that I am troubled withal. youth, I mult coafeis, are ways too.

Ch. Juf. To punith you by che heels, would Ch. Jull. Do you set down your name in the imed the attention of your ears; and I care not, fcrowl of youth, that are written down old with if I do become your physician.

all the characters of age? Have you not a muilt Fal. I am as poor as jub, my lord ; but not lo eye! a dry hand ? a yellow cheek? a white patient : your lord'hip may minifter the potion of beard? a decreasing leg? an increasing belly ? Is imprisonment to me, in respect of poverty ; but not your voice broken? your wind thort? your how I should be your patient to follow your pre- chin double ? your wit single ad every part scriptions, the wife may make some dram of a about you blasted with antiqnicy ? and will you scruple, or, indeed, a scruple itself.

yet call yourielf young? Fie, fie, fie, Sir Cb. Juft. I sent for you, when there were mat- John ! ters against you for your life, to come speak with Fal. My lord, I was born about three of the

clock in the afternoon, with a white hexl, and Fal. As I was then advised by my learned coun- something a round belly. For my voice,-I have fel in the laws of this land-service, I did not come. lost it with ballowing and singing or anthems. To

Ch. Yul. Well, the truth is, Sir John, you live approve my youth further, I will not :, the truth in great infamy.

is, I am only old in judgement and understanding ; Fal. He that buckles him in my belt, cannot and he that will caper with me for a thousins live in less.

marks, let him lend me the money, and have at Ch. Juft. Your means are very Nender, and your him. For the box o' the ear that the prince gave

you-he gave it like a rude prince, and you took Fal. I would it were otherwise ; I would my lie like a sensible lord. I have check'd him for it; means were greater, and my waist slenderer. and the young lion repents : marry, not in alhes,

Ch. Yufi. You have mis-led the youthful prince. and fack-cloth ; but in new filk, and old fack.

Fal. The young prince hath mil-led me : 1 am Ch. Juft. Well, heaven send the prince a better the fellow with the great belly, and he my dog'. companion !

Ch. Juft. Well, I am loth to gall a new-healid Fal. Heaven send the companion a better prince! wound; your day's service at Shrewsbury hath a I cannot rid my hands of him. little gilded over your night's exploit on Gads-hill : Ch. Juft. Well, the king hath sever'd you and you may thank the unquiet time for your quiet prince Harry: I hear, you are going with lord s'er-posting that action.

John of Lancaster, againit the archbishop, and the Fal. My lord?

earl of Northumberland. Ch. Yuf. But since all is well, keep it so : wake Fal. Yea; 1 thank your pretty sweet wit for not a sleeping wolf.

lit. But look you, pray, all you that kils my lady

me.

waste great.

1 Dr. Johnson says, he does not understand this joke; that dogs lead the blind, but why does a dng lead the fat? To which Dr. Farmer replies, “ If the Fellow's great Belly prevented him froin feeing his way, he would want a dog, as well as a blind man.” 2 A wajjel candle is a larze ca. dlelighted up alá fcaft. * Meaning, I cannot pass current. 4. That is, in these times, when the prevaici.ce of trade has prodiowed that meauness that rates the merit of every thing by money. A cojier-monyet is a cofird-monger, a dealer in apples, called by that name, because they are shaped like a triod, 1. e. a man's head. s Pregnancy is readincés.

O i. e. old age.

ресе

Page. He said, sir, the water it self was a good a horse in Smithfield: if I could get me but a wife healthy water : hut, for the party that owed it, he in the itews, I were mann'd, hors'è, and wir'd. might have more diseases than he knew for.

Enter the Lord Chief Justice, and Servants. Fal. Men of all sorts take a pride to gird? at Page. Sir, here comes the nobleman that comme : The brain of this foolish-compounied clay, mitted the prince for striking him about Barman, is not able to invent any thing that tends to dolph. laughter, more than I invent, or is invented on me : Fal. Wait close, I will not see him. I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that Ch. Ff. What's he that goes there? wit is in other men. I do here walk before thee, Serv. Falstaff, an’t please your lordship. like a fow, that hath overwhelmed all her litter Ch. Yuf. He that was in question for the robbut one.

If the prince put thee into my service bery? for any othei' reason than to set me off, why then I Sca. He, my lord: but he hath fince done have no judgement. Thou whoreson mandrake, good iervice at Sirewbury; and, as I hear, is thou art fitter to be worn in my cap, than to wait now going with some charge to the lord John of at my heels.

I was never mann'd 3 with an agate Lancaiter. 'till now : but I will neither set you in gold nor Ch. Fufi. What, to York! Call him back silver, but in vile apparel, and send you back again again. to your master, for a jewel ; the juvenal 4, the Serv. Sir John Falftaff ! prince your matter, whose chin is not yet fledg'd. Fal. Boy, tell him I am deaf. I will sooner have a beard grow in the palm of my Page. You must speak louder, my master is hand, than he shall get one on his cheek ; yet he deaf. will not stick to say, his face is a face-royal. Hea Cb. Yuf. I am sure he is, to the hearing of any ven may finish it when he will, it is not a hair thing good. -Go, pluck him by the elbow; I amiss yet : he may keep it ftill as a face-royal, for must speak with him. a barber shall never earn fixpence out of its; and Serv. Sir John, yet he will be crowing, as if he had writ man ever Fal. What ! a young knave, and beg! Is there since his father was a batchelor. He may keep his not wars: is there not employment : Doth not own grace, but he is almost out of mine, I can ar- the king lack subjects ? do not the rebels want sure him.-What said master Dombledon about foldiers . Though it be a shame to be on any side the fattin for my Tort cloak, and flops?

but one, it is worse shame to beg than to be on Page. He said, sir, you should procure him bet- the worst side, were it worse than the name of ter assurance than Bardolph: he would not take his rebellion can tell how to make it. bond and yours ; he lik'd not the security.

Sov. You mistake me, fir. Fal. Let him be damn'd like the glutton! may Fal. Why, fir, did I say you were an honest his tongue be hotter !-A whorefon Achitophel! man? Setting my knighthooki and my foldierthip a rascally yea-forsooth knave! to bear a gentleman aside, I had lied in my throat if I had faid fo. in hand, and then stand upon security!—The Serv, I pray you, fır, then let your knighthood whoreson smooth-pates do now wear nothing but and your foldiership aside ; and give me leave to high fhoes, and bunches of keys at their girdles; tell you, you lie in your throat, if you say I am and if a man is thorough with them? in honest any other than an honest man. taking up, then they must land upon-security. I Fal. I give thee leave to tell me so ! I lay afide had as lief they woului put ratsoane in my mouth, that which grow's to me! If thou get'ít any leave as offer to stop it with security. I look'd he should of me, Deng me; if thou tak ft leave, thou wert have sent me two-and-twenty yards of fattin, as I better be hang'd: You hunt-counter 1, hence ! am a true knight, and he sends me security. Well, avaunt ! he may neep in security ; for he hath the horn of Serv. Sir, my lord would speak with you. abundance, and the lightness of his wife shines Cb. Yuji. Sir John Falstaff, a word with you. through it : and yet cannot be see, though he have Fal. My good lord ! God give your lordship his own lanthurn to light him. -Where's good time of day. I am glad to see your loruthip Bardolph?

abroad: I heard say, your lordship was fick : I Page. He's gone into Smithfield to buy your hope, you lordship goes abroad by advice. Your worship 2 horse.

lordship, though not clean part your youth, hath Fal. I bought him in Paul's S, and he'll buy melyet some smack of age in you, some relish of the

! ;. e. to gibe. 2 Mandrake is a root supposed to have the shape of a man. 3 That is, I never before had an agate for my man. Our author alludes to the little figures cut in agates, and other hard stones, tor seals; and therefore Falstaff says, I will set you neither in gold ner silver. 4 i. e. the young man,

5 Mr. Steevens thinks, "this quibbling allusion is to the Engliih real, rial, or roval; and tha: the poet seems to mcan, that a barber can no more earn fixpence by his face-royal, than by the face stamped on the coin called a royal; the one requiring as little shaving as the other."

6 That is, to keep a gentleman in expectation. 7 To be thorough seems to be the fame with che prescrit phrale to be in with (in debt; a iradesman. 8 At that time the refort of idle people, chcals, and knights of the post. 9 This judge was Sir William Gascoigne, chicf justice of the king's-benchi He died December 17, 1413, and was buried in Harwood church, in Yorkshire, fo That is, blunderer.

faltness

faltness of time ; and I most humbly beseech your Fal. To wake a wolf, is as bad as to smell a fox. lord'hip, to have a reverend care of your health. Ch. Juft. What ! you are as a candle, the better Cb. Yufit

. Sir John, I sent for you before your part burnt out. expedition to Shrewfoury.

Fal. A waffel 2 candle, my lord; all tallow : Fal. If it pleate your lordship, I hear his ma- but if I did say of wax, my growth would approve jefty is return'd with some discomfort from Wales. the truth.

Ch. Wt. I talk not of his majesty : -You Ch. Juft. There is not a white hair on your face, would not come when I sent for you.

but should have his effect of gravity. Fal. And I hear moreover, his-highness is fallen

Fal. His effect of gravy, gravy, gravy. into this fame whoreson apoplexy.

Ch. Fuft. You follow the young prince up and Cb. Hift. Well, heaven mend him! I pray, let down, like his ill angel. me speak with you.

Fal. Not fu, my lord ; your ill angel is light ; Fal. This apoplexy is, as I take it, a kind of but, I hope, he that looks upon me, will take me lethargy, an't please your lordship; a kind of without weighing : and yet, in fome respects, I fleeping in the blood, a whoreson tingling. grant, I cannot go, I cannot tell 3 : Virtue is of Cb. Juft

. What tell you me of it? be it as it is. so little regard in these cofter-monger times 4, that Fal. Ii kath its original from much grief ; from true valour is turn'd bear-herd : Pregnancy s is study, and perturbation of the brain : I have read made a tapster, and hath his quick wit walted in the cause of his effects in Galen ; it is a kind of giving reckonings : all the other gifts appertinent deafness.

to man, as the malice of this age shapes them, are Cb. Full. I think, you are fallen into the disease; not worth a gooseberry. You, that are old, confor you hear not what I say to you.

lider not the capacities of us that are young ; you Fal. Very well, my lord, very well : rather, measure the heat of our livers with the bitterness an't please you, it is the disease of not listening, the of your galls: and we that are in the vaward of our malady of not marking, that I am troubled withal. youth, 1 mult confels, are wags too.

Ch. Yul. To punish you by the heels, would Cb. Juft. Do you set down your name in the ime id the attention of your ears; and I care not, scrowl of youth, that are written down old with if I do become your physician.

all the characters of age? Have you not a moitt Fal. I am as poor as Jub, my lord ; but not lo eye ? a dry hand ? a yellow cheek? a white patient : your lord'hip may minifter the potion of beard? a decreasing leg: an increafing belly ? Is imprisonment to me, in respect of poverty ; but not your voice broken? your wind short? your how I should be your patient to follow your pre- chin double ? your wit single ? and every part scriptions, the wise may make some dram of a about you biafted with antiquity • ? and will you scruple, or, indeed, a scruple itself.

yet call yourielf young ? Fie, fie, fie, Sir Ch. Juft. I sent for you, when there were mat- John ! ters against you for your life, to come speak with Fal. My lord, I was born about three of the

clock in the afternoon, with a white head, and Fal. As I was then advised by my learned coun- iomething a round belly. For my voice, I have sel in the laws of this land-service, I did not come. lost it with ballowing and finging of anthems. To

Cb. Jujt. Well, the truth is, Sir John, you live approve my youth further, I will not :. the truth in great infamy.

is, I am only old in judgement and under 1tanding ; Fal. He that buckles him in my belt, cannot and he that will caper with me for a thousand live in less.

marks, let him lend me the money, and have at Ch. Fus. Your means are very Nender, and your him. For the box o' the ear that the prince gave

you-he gave it like a rude prince, and you took Fal. I would it were otherwise; I would my lie like a sensible lord. I have check'd him for it; means were greater, and my waist nenderer. and the young lion repents : marry, not in alhes,

Ch. Yufi. You have mil-led the youthful prince. and fack-cloth ; but in new filk, and old lack.

Fal. The young prince hath mil-led me : I am Cb. Juft. Well, heaven send the prince a better the fellow with the great belly, and he my dog'. companion !

Ch. Juli. Well, I am loth to gall a new-heald Fal. Heaven send the companion a better prince ! wound; your day's service at Shrewsbury hath a I cannot rid my hands of him. little gilded over your night's exploit on Gads-hill : Ch. Juft. Well, the king hath sever'd you and you may thank the unquiet time for your quiet prince Harry: I hear, you are going with lord s'er-poiting that action.

John of Lancaster, againit the archbishop, and the Fal. My lord ?

earl of Northumberland. Ch. Yuß. But since all is well, keep it so : wake Fal. Yea; I thank your pretty sweet wit for not a sleeping wolf.

it. But look you, pray, all you that kifs my lady

me.

watte great.

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! Dr. Johnson fays, he does not understand this joke; that dogs lead the blind, but why docs a dng lead the fat? To which Dr. Farmer replies, “ If the Fellow's greut Belly prevented him from seeing his way, he would want a dog, as well as a blind man." 2 A wajjel candle is a laro cu. dle ligated up at a fcant. 3 Meaning, I cannot pass current. 4 That is, in the sc times, when the prevalence of trade has produced that menuncis chat rates the merit of every thing by money. A cojler-9077.C is a cufard-monger, a dealer in apples, called by that name, because they are ihaped like a comide i. c. a man's head. s Pregnancy is readiness. 6 i. e. old age.

peace

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