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OR, A.

PRACTICAL TREATISE

ON THE METHODS OF ACQUIRING

USEFUL AND POLITE LEARNING.

BY

VICESIMUS KNOX, M. A.
FORMERLY FELLOW OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, OXFORD,

AND NOW MASTER OF TUNBRIDGE-SCHOOL.

THE SEVENTH EDITION,

IN TWO VOLUME S.

VOL. I.

ΟΥ ΜΙΚΡΟΝ ΔΙΑΦΕΡΕΙ ΤΟ ΟΥΤΩΣ Η ΟΥΤΩΣ ΕΥΘΥΣ ΕΚ
ΝΕΩΝ ΕΘΙΖΕΣΘΑΙ, ΑΛΛΑ ΠΑΜΠΟΛΥ ΜΑΛΛΟΝ ΔΕ, ΤΟ ΠΑΝ.

ARISTOT.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR C. DILLY, IN THE POULTRY.

MDCCLXXXV.

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TO

THE WORSHIPFUL

COMPANY OF SKINNERS,

THE

Patrons of TUNBRIDGE-School.

GENTLEMEN' THE fulsome language of a flattert ing Dedication would be no less disagreeable to you to receive, than to me to offer. But I will not lose an opportunity of publicly expressing to you the honest sentiments of an unfeigned respect. There seems, indeed, a peculiar propriety in dedicating a Treatise on Education to those who have constituted me, in a manner which increases the obligation, the fuperintendant of an ancient and respectable seminary,

To the honour of the commercial orders in the community, it must be remarked, that, amidst the avocations of lucrative pursuits, they have usually paid

attention

attention to the state of literature, and have greatly contributed to the diffusion of polite learning, by expending the superfuity of their opulence in literary establishments.

If we examine the origin of many antient foundations, we shall find a great number of schools and colleges instituted, endowed, and augmented, by the liberality of rich citizens ; by a liberality displayed at that early period, when reviving learning, in a state of infantine immaturity, might again have expired, had The not been fostered by the warm protection of mercantile munificence.

As one of the early benefactors to literature, Sir Andrew Judd, a Lord Mayor of London, and the pious founder of Tunbridge-School in the reign of Edward the Sixth, claims a share of general gratitude. He was one of the many generous and worthy characters who have adorned your very respectable Society, and, fortunately for the school, has appointed you the guardians and adminiîtrators of his bounty. You have not only expended his bequests in the service of the school with the strictest integrity, but from other resources have adorned and enlarged the edifice, and promoted

every improvement which can conduce to the comfort of the inafter, and the accommodation of the scholar.

A fortune acquired by commerce, when it is discreetly expended in advancing learning, and in other acts of beneficence, acquires a grace and elegance, which a life devoted to the accumulation of money for its own sake, can seldom poffess. Indeed, the many instances of the English citizens generosity in building and enriching schools and col. leges, and in affording exhibitions for the maintenance of studious youth * at the universities, seem to prove the error of an opinion very generally received, that a laborious attention to trade renders the sentiments mean and narrow. In a few individuals, indeed, of neglected education, and confined ideas, it certainly

* Sir Thomas Smythe, an ancestor of the late Lord Chief Baron, gave six exhibitions to Tunbridge scholars, and was in other refpects a great benefactor. Several other persons, chiefly rich CITIZENS, have also bequeathed exhibitions to the school. There are few of the City Companies which have not many exhibitions in their disposal, left by some of their members for students in the universities. The Skinners, I am informed, have many. So also have the Grocers, the Clothworkers, the Fishmongers, and, I believe, all the twelve and many of the inferior Companies. VOL. I. а ,

has

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