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INDE X.

Principal topics, black; words and subordinate topics, Roman; titles of periodicals, “ Roman" quoted; other proper names in SMALL CAPITALS; foreign expressions, italic.

A.

Adaptation, in choice of words, 90

91 ; in choice between particle and A l'outrance, 28.

more important word at end of senÀ merveille, 29.

tence, 201; in choice of sentences, A No. 1, 12.

228; in exposition, 318; in perAbatis, 27.

suasion, 397.
Abattoir, 16.

Addenda, for addendum, 49.
ABBOTT, E. A., 48.

ADDISON, JOSEPH, 10, 34, 49, 65,
Abbreviated forms, accepted and 133, 167, 195, 245, 314, 372.

condemned, 34; allowable in poe- Address to, 20.
try but not in prose, 35.

Adit, 26.
ABINGER, LORD, (James Scarlett), Adjectives, comparison of dissyl.
383, 398.

labic and polysyllabic, 22; withAbolishment, for abolition, 23. out grammatical reference, 52; Above par, 12.

misused for adverbs, ' 67 ; with Abstraction, for pilfering, 109. verbs, when preferable to adverbs, Accede, distinguished from cede, 67; obscure demonstrative, 86; 37; wrongly used, 46.

pleonastic, 160; unwise advice to Accent, standard of, 12.

young writers concerning use of, Accept of, 20.

161. Accessorily, for as an accessory, 22. Admire, to, 12. Accordingly, 148.

Admission, Admittance, 19.
Accredit, Credit, distinguished, 38. Admit, Confess, distinguished, 18.
Acrobat, 27.

Admit of, 20.
Actions, Acts, distinguished, 18. Adullamite, 32.
Active form, preferable to passive, Advent, 12.

20; when to be avoided, 20. Adverbial expressions, position of, Acute, 115.

202. Ad, for advertisement, 34.

Adverbs, misused for adjectives, 67; Ad infinitum, 16.

with verbs, when preferable to Ad libitum, 16.

adjectives, 67; between to and the ADAMS, John Couch, 353.

infinitive, 69 ; pleonastic, 158. ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY, 168, 380. ÆSCHINES, 380.

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ÆSCHYLUS, 102.

And now, 159.
Afeard, for afraid, 26.

And now comes, 12.
Affatuated, 22.

And so, 159.
Affectation, 26, 144, 160.

And which construction, 138.
Aforesaid, 12.

ANDREW, JOHN A., 62.
Again-bite, 101.

Anemone, 99.
Again-rising, 101.

Anglo-Saxon, words from, compared
Aggravating, for provoking, 42, 47. with words from Latin, 96-102;
Aggregate, to, 12.

not a literary language, 101.
Aggressor, first or original, 154. ANGUS, JOSEPH, 61, 139.
Agone, 26.

Annexion, for annexation, 24.
Agricultural interest, 104.

Anon, 9.
Agriculturist, preferable to agri- Antagonism between clearness and
culturalist, 21.

precision, 94.
Al fresco, 16.

Antagonize, for oppose, 12.
Alabama claims, 62.

Antecedent probability, argument
Album, 99.

from, defined, 354; explained, 354-
ALFORD, HENRY, 30, 51.

356; use by science, 356 ; use in
“ Alice in Wonderland,” 76.

fiction, 357 ; need of argument
Allan, J. H., 138.

from, 358; preponderance of prob-
Alliance, for marriage, 102.

ability, 359 ; fallacious arguments
Alliteration in excess, 136.

from, 361; argument from sign
Allow, for admit, maintain, 12. opposed by that from, 376; argu-
Allude, distinguished from mention ment from, combined with that

and refer, 39; wrongly used, 45. from sign and from example, 376;
Allusions, 39.

place in arrangement of proof, 383.
Alone, for oply, 42, 46.

Anti-climax, examples of, 194;
Along the line of, along these lines, when effective, 195.
77.

Antique, 23.
Alway, 9.

Antithesis, defined, 188; force and
Amateur, 27.

clearness often gained by, 188; ex-
Ambassador, 23.

amples of, 189; Burke's use of,
Ambiguity of terms, 94, 95, 310. 190; excesses in the use of, 191 ;
See Clearness.

useful in exposition, 324.
Ambrosia, 27.

Anxious seat, on the, 12.
America, words peculiar to, 14. Aphorisms, 289.
American and British usage, 13–15. Apparently, Evidently, distinguished,
American language, possible exis- 39.
tence of a distinct, 14.

Appreciate, for rise in value, 12.
Amiableness, to be avoided, 21. Approve of, 20.
Among, preferable to amongst, 21; Arabic, words from the, 27.
wrongly used, 68.

Archaic expressions, when permis
ANACREON, 277.

gible, 9-10.
Analogy, argument from, a form of Ardor, 115.

argument from example, 361; ex. Argue, Plead, distinguished, 40.
plained, 364-368; false analogies, Arguing beside the point, 344, 346-
369-373.

349.
Analytic method in exposition, 314. Arguing in a circle, 344.
Ancient, Old, 99.

Argument, Plea, distinguished, 40.
Ancient purloiner, 103.

Argument, discriminated from other
And, use and misuse of, 87–88; used kinds of composition, 247; chap-
to connect expressions not co-or-

ter on, 327-400: distinguished
dinate, 89, 139; pleonastic, 159 ; from exposition, 327; in the form
omission of, gives rapidity, 159. of exposition, 327 ; prepared for

-

ness, 21.

by exposition, 328; proposition | Artificiality, preferable to artificial-
and proof, 328-331 ; a word not a
subject for, 328; which proves too Artiste, 28, 29.
much, 330; ironical, 331; burden of Artistic description, 254–280 : aim
proof and presumption, 331-333; and method of, 254 ; emotion in,
evidence, 334-341 ; deduction and 256–262; the pathetic fallacy, 257;
induction, 341-353; antecedent resources of, 262; telling character-
probability, example, sign, 354- istics, 262; one well-chosen word,
379; experience the basis of all, 268; effect that suggests cause,
379; arrangement, 379-385; per- 270; words that suggest motion,
suasion, 386–399; examples of, 271; in narrative form, 275.
399. See Antecedent probability, As, pleonastic, 158.
Deduction, Example, Fallacies, In- As an accessory, preferable to ac-
duction, Persuasion, Sign, Testi- cessorily, 22.
mony.

As lief, 5, 23.
Argumentative examples, distin- Ascend up, 20.

guished from illustrative, 361; Assist, for be present, 43.
vary in force, 363.

Association of ideas, arguments based
Arguments, strength of combined, on, 354, 373–375.
376-379; order of, 383.

Associations with words of Anglo-
Argumentum ad hominem, 347, 386. Saxon origin and with those of
Argumentum ad populum, 347.

Latin, 98, 101-102.
ARISTIDES, 361.

Assumption not argument, 346.
Aristocratic, preferable to aristo Assurance, Insurance, 19.
cratical, 21.

“ Athenæum (the), 46, 49, 284,
ARISTOTLE, 112, 118, 330, 341, 357, 376.
366.

Athletics, Games, 2, 3.
Arméd, 10.

“ Atlantic Monthly” (the), 119, 131,
ARNOLD, MATTHEW, 10, 32, 36, 56,

170.
57, 151, 163, 169, 202, 225, 229, Atmosphere, 77.

255, 322, 326, 355, 370, 387, 400. Attain to, 20.
Aroma, 99.

Attar (of roses), 27.
Around, round usually preferable Attention, 115.
to, 21.

ATTERBURY, BISHOP, 375.
Arrangement, 177-246 : the ideal, Audible to the ear, 154.

177; clearness in, 177–183; force August, 101.
in, 184–198; ease in, 198–208; for- AUSTEN, JANE, 29, 67, 120, 134,
eign, 204-208; “Johnsonese,” 205; 181, 182, 206, 215, 285, 289,
theories of Bentham and Spencer 298.
concerning, 207; unity in, 208- Authenticity, preferable to authen-
216 ; in sentences of different ticalness, 21.
kinds, 216–230; in paragraphs, Authority, evidence derived from,
230-238; in whole compositions, 336.
239,246 ; in exposition, 314; in Autobiography, his own, 154.
argument, 379-385: importance of Aversion, preferable to averseness,
good, 380; order of proposition 21.
and proof, 381, of arguments from Avocation, distinguished from voca-
antecedent probability, example, tion, 39; wrongly used, 44, 70.
sign, 383; place for refutation, Aware, Conscious, distinguished, 18.
384. See Clearness, Ease, Force, Awfully, 75.
Kinds of sentences, Paragraphs, Awfully pretty, 75.

Unity, Whole compositions. Awkward arrangement, 202-206.
Art, 99.

Awkward squad, 10.
Articles, omission of, 146,

Axe, for ask, 13, 26.

B.

Being sold, or selling, 20.

BELLAMY, EDWARD, 345.
BACKWARD, backwards, 21.

BEMIS, GEORGE, 341.
Bacon, Francis, 331, 372, 376-377. Bennington's Centennial, 50.
Bad, for badly, 68.

BENSON, E. F., 69, 88, 120, 135, 157,
Bad habits, for drunkenness, 109.

182.
Bad orthography, 3.

BENTHAM, JEREMY, 22, 207, 346.
Bag and baggage, 156.

BESANT, WALTER, 60.
BAGEHOT, WALTER, 326.

Beside, besides, 22.
Baggage, used by Addison, 10; or Beside the point, arguing, 344, 346-
luggage, 14.

349.
Baggage-car, or luggage-van, 15. Better, had, 5; might, 5.
BAIN, ALEXANDER, 112, 116. Between, wrongly used, 68.
BAKER, GEORGE P., 391, 400. Betwixt, 9.
Balance, the, 12.

BIBLE (the), 5, 60, 62, 63, 113, 117,
Balanced sentences, 226–227.

119, 162, 163, 164, 174, 189.
BALFOUR, A. J., 337, 367.

Bigot, 33.
Ballads, old English, 160.

Bike, byke, for bicycle, 34.
BANCROFT, GEORGE, 190.

Biography, method in, 295.
Bang, 112.

BIRRELL, AUGUSTINE, 46.
Banter, 23, 33.

Biscuit, or cracker, 14.
Barbarisms, violations of good use, BLACK, WILLIAM, 46, 134.

25; section on, 25-37 : defined, BLACKMORE, R. D., 48.
25; obsolete words, 25; new Blair, Hugh, 64, 86, 159, 183, 202,
words, 27; words of foreign 209.
origin, 27; borrowed finery, 28; Blasé, 29, 30.
foreign fashions in spelling, 31; Blizzard, 14.
slang, 32; vulgarisms, 33; abbre- Bloody, Sanguine, 99.
viated forms, 34; the safe rule in Blue, the steadfast, 9.
determining, 35.

Blue-stocking, 33.
Barn-burner, 32.

Board-school, 14.
BARRIE, J. M., 174.

Bobbin, or spool, 15.
Barrister, 14.

Body, Corpse, Corporal, 99.
BARROW, ISAAC, 222.

Bogus, 17.
Bas bleu, 16.

Bold and audacious, 156.
Based on, 116.

BOLINGBROKE, LORD, 331.
Be, perfect and pluperfect tenses of, Bombast, 33.

with to and substantive or infini- Bonanza, to strike a, 13.
tive, 6.

Boodle, 17.
Beastly, 75.

Booking-clerk, or ticket-agent, 15.
Beau monde, 30.

Bookish words, 108.
Beautifullest, for most beautiful, 22. Boom, 112.
Bed-rock, to get down to, 13. Boomers, 12.
BEECHER, HENRY WARD, 391. Βοώπις πότνια "Ηρη, 90.
Been to (see), 6.

Bore, 10.
Been to (the theatre), 6.

Borrowed verbal finery, 28-30.
Beet, or beet-root, 15.

“Boston Daily Advertiser” (the),
Beetle, or bug, 15.

387.
Begging the question, 344-346. “ Boston Herald” (the), 344.
Begin, preferable to commence, 21. BoswELL, JAMES, 165.
Beginnings of sentences, weak, 187. Both, and, (correspondents), position
Being, Existence, 3.

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20

of, 178.
Being beaten, or beating, 20. Boughten, 12.
Being built, or building, 20.

Box, or trunk, 14.

Bule

14.

BUR
BUSE

Boycott, to, 33.

Business, vocabulary of, 75.
Braces, or suspenders, 14.

But, use and misuse of, 87–89; repe
Brainy, 17.

tition of, 135.
Breed up, 20.

But also, position of, 178.
BREEN, HENRY H., 49.

BUTLER, JOSEPH, 364, 372.
Brevity, may be sacrificed to eu. Buzz, 112.

phony, 22; misplaced, 174; im- Buzz, Murmur, 3.
portant in statement of proposi- By, wrongly used, 68.

tion, 382. See Conciseness. By dint of, 5.
Brick (brig), 27.

BYRON, LORD, 52, 112, 119, 124, 128,
Bridge over, 20.

169, 227, 269.
Bright, John, 96, 100, 154, 171,

399.
British and American usage, 13-15.
BRONTË, CHARLOTTE, 147.
BROOKS, PHILLIPS, 304.

CAB, or hack, 14; abbreviated from
BROUGHAM, LORD, 114, 147, 396, cabriolet, 34.
398.

Cabal, 33.
BROUGHTON, RHODA, 261.

Cable, for telegram or telegraph, 17.
BROWN, GOOLD, 65.

Cablegram, 33.
BROWN, JOHN, 398.

CÆSAR, JULIUS, 369, 370.
BROWNING, ELIZABETH BARRETT, Calculate, to, 12.
9, 116, 142.

CALHOUN, JOHN C., 399.
BROWNING, ROBERT, 5, 78, 107, 110, CAMPBELL, GEORGE, 4, 8, 20, 21,

129, 143, 149, 170, 171, 175, 186, 23, 31, 71, 105, 112, 113, 158, 162.
264, 267, 268.

CAMPBELL, THOMAS, 197.
Brush off of, 20.

Campo, campus, 12.
BRYANT, WILLIAM CULLEN, 32, 277. Can, for may, 58.
BRYCE, JAMES, 307.

Cant, 33.
Budget, 28.

Cant expressions, short life of, 32.
Bug, or beetle, 15.

Cap, for captain, 34.
Bulldoze, to, 17.

Car, or carriage (railway), 15.
Bully, 17, 75.

Cargo, 27.
BULWER-LYTTON, (First Lord Lyt- Caricature, Dickens sometimes
ton), 50, 117, 154, 100.

guilty of, 270.
Bumble-bee, 112.

CARLYLE, JANE WELSH, 52.
Bumptious, 17.

CARLYLE, THOMAS, 22, 41, 82, 115,
Buncombe, 33.

124, 143, 169, 186, 234, 267.
BUNYAN, JOHN, 97, 227.

Carpet-bagger, 32.
Buoy, 27.

Carriage (railway), or car, 15.
Burden of proof, 331–333. CARROLL, Lewis, 67.
Bureau, or chest of drawers, 15. Carry, or portage, 15.
Bureau of Pomona, 102.

Carryall, 14.
Burglarized, 34.

CARTER, JAMES COOLIDGE, 386.
BURKE, EDMUND, 4, 51, 64, 86, 97, Case. See Nominative, Possessive,

114, 122, 150, 151, 109, 189, 190, Objective.
191, 193, 219, 256, 312, 331, 382, Casket, for coffin, 109.
384, 389, 391, 399.

Caste, 27.
BURNEY, FRÁNCES, 69, 155, 205, Catch on, for catch the meaning, 17.
206.

Caucus, 14.
BURNS, ROBERT, 50, 80, 129, 130, Cause and effect, arguments based
142.

on relation of, 350, 354-361, 375.
BURR, AARON, 369, 370.

CAVENDISH, HENRY, 255.
BUSHNELL, HORACE, 304, 345. Cede, Accede, distinguished, 37.

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