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COPYRIGHT, 1915
CLARK UNIVERSITY

THE WAVERLY PRESS

BALTIMORE. U. 8. A.

INDEX OF AUTHORS

sources.

BARRETT, JOHN. Pan-American Possibilities....

19-29

BINGHAM, HIRAM. The Probable Effect of the Opening of the

Panama Canal on our Economic Relations with the People of

the West Coast of South America..

49-67

BOYCE, W. D. Advantages of Making the Canal Zone a Free City

and Free Port......

68-83

BRANDON, EDGAR Ewing. Higher Education in Latin America. 84-97

BROWN, T. MACMILLAN. An Ancient Race Blending Region in the
Pacific..

151-159
DODGE, PERCIVAL. The Development of Morocco..

125-132
ELLIS, GEORGE W. The Psychology of American Race Prejudice. 297–315
Sociological Appraisement of Liberian Re-

399-415

FINLEY, John P. The Mohammedan Problem in the Philippines 353–363

GOODALE, WM. W. The Hawaian as an Unskilled Laborer ......... 416-437

GRAHAME, LEOPOLD. The Relations of the United States with the

Latin-American Republics..

105-113

HAMMOND, John Hays. The Development of our Latin-American

League.....

44-48

HUNTINGTON, ELLSWORTH. The Adaptability of the White Man

to Tropical America..

185–211

JONES, JOHN P. The Social and Racial Unrest in India..

276-284

LAUFER, BERTHOLD. Some Fundamental Ideas of Chinese Culture 160–174

MONETA, JOSE. Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego...

30–43

Montt, David. The Mind of the Latin-American Nations. 114-121

NARUSE, Jinzo. The Concordia of Races....

268-275

NASMYTH, GEORGE W. The Universities and American Interna-
tional Relations....

98-104

ODOM, HOWARD W. Standards of Measurement for Race Develop-

ment..

364-383

PASCHKE, THEODORE. Our Duty Toward Mexico and Central

America..

175-184

Pezet, FEDERICO A. Contrasts in the Development of Nationality
in the Anglo- and Latin-American .....

1-18

QUEZON, MANUEL L. Recent Progress in the Philippines.

233-246

SELDEN, LYNDE. Environment and Korea..

316-329

STOUTEMYER, J. HOWARD. Race Education.

438-466

Totah, KHALIL A. The Young Turkish Farce.

384-398

TREAT, Payson J. The New Indian Councils...

285–296
TSANOFF, RADOSLAV A. Bulgaria's Rôle in the Balkans.

247-267
WALLIS, Wilson D. Moral and Racial Prejudice..

212-229
WILLIAMS, TALCOTT. The Diplomatic Relations of Morocco.. 133-150

NOTES AND REVIEWS

BABSON, Roger W. The Future of World Peace....

481-482

BARROWS, David PRESCOTT. A Decade of American Government

in the Philippines, 1903–1918.

480-481

iii

283220

BLAKESLEE, GEORGE H., Editor. Latin America: Addresses Deliv-
ered at Clark University. Louis N. Wilson..

123-124
Boas, FRANZ. Einfluss von Erblichkeit und Umwelt auf das
Wachstum.....

339-340
Boyce, WILLIAM D. United States Colonies and Dependencies.. 482-483
BRAWLEY, BENJAMIN GRIFFITH. A Short History of the American
Negro...

344-345
BROWN, J. Macmillan. The Dutch East: Sketches and Pictures.
P.J. Treat....

483
Chapin, F. STUART. An Introduction to the Study of Social Evolu-
tion. F. H. Hankins....

122
DowD, JEROME. The Negro Races, a Sociological Study

341
EDWARDS, ALBERT. The Barbary Coast....

340-341
ELLIS, GEORGE W. Negro Culture in West Africa..

336
FIELDING-HALL, H. The Passing of Empire......

346-348
FISCHER, EUGEN. Die Rehobother Bastards und das Bastardierungs-
problem beim Menschen......

336-337
FULLER, SIR BAMPFYLDE. The Empire of India.

350-351
FURLONG, CHARLES WELLINGTON. The Gateway to the Sahara.. 4684469
VAN GENNEP, ARNOLD. En Algérie....

337-338
GULICK, SIDNEY L. The American Japanese Problem..

469-470
HARADA, TasuKU. The Faith of Japan...

470-472
HEADLAND, Isaac Taylor. Home Life in China..

474
HUAN-CHANG, CHEN. The Economic Principles of Confucius and
his School......

230
JONES, GEORGE HEBER. One of Japan's Great Problems.

330-335
JONES, LIVINGSTON F. A Study of the Thlingets of Alaska..

476-477
JUNOD, HENRI A. The Life of a South African Tribe...

338
KAWAKAMI, Kıyoshi K. Asia at the Door....

475-476
LAZAROVICH-HREBELANOVICH. The Orient Question, Today and
Tomorrow.

473-474
Low, SIDNEY. Egypt in Transition....

477-478
Mabie, HAMILTON Wright. Japan, Today and Tomorrow.

480
MARTIN, Asa E. Our Negro Population ....

344
MECHLIN, John MOFFATT. Democracy and Race Friction..

341-342
MILLER, KELLY. Out of the House of Bondage ...

345-346
Mitra, S. M. Anglo-Indian Studies...

348-350
NANSEN, FRIDJTOF. Through Siberia, the Land of the Future 467-468
PARKER, H. Village Folk-Tales of Ceylon....

472-473
QUILLIN, FRANK U. The Color Line in Ohio.

343-344
REINHEIMER, HERMANN. Evolution by Coöperation. F. H. Han-

123
Russell, John H. The Free Negro in Virginia....

342-343
STARR, FREDERICK. Liberia: History, Description, Problems..

345
WEEKS, John H. Among Congo Cannibals....

340
WESTERMARCK, EDWARD. Marriage Ceremonies in Morocco.

339
WIRTH, ALBRECHT. Rasse und Volk...

478-480

kins....

THE JOURNAL OF
RACE DEVELOPMENT

Vol. 5

JULY, 1914

No. 1

CONTRASTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONALITY IN THE ANGLO- AND LATIN

AMERICAN

By Señor Don Federico A. Pezet, Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary from Peru

I have chosen as my subject, a question that is most important at this time, when there is a growing tendency to know better and understand the peoples of the LatinAmerican nations; to get closer to them by establishing bonds of friendship through commercial relations based on mutual respect and confidence, as is evidenced by this conference, and by the recent utterances of the President of the United States in his memorable declarations at Mobile.

In order to determine properly the relative positions and conditions of the two great groups of individuals that people this American world, north and south of the Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico, we must first study the contrasts in the development of nationality in these two groups that, for expediency, I shall denominate or class as “Anglo-American," and "Latin-American."

No man can truly appreciate another, if he does not know him. No nation can feel friendship towards another if it does not know it. But to know, should imply understanding, without which there can be nothing in common, and understanding is an essential to draw individuals together, and so it is with nations.

International relations are necessary, they are cultivated for many reasons, but they do not necessarily mean friendship. Nations, like individuals, live on good terms with their neighbors because it behooves them to do so, but this

1

THE JOURNAL OF RACE DEVELOPMENT, VOL. 5, NO. 1, 1914

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