The Miscellaneous Works: In Verse and Prose, Volumen1

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R. Marchbank, and sold by S. Price, W. Watson, 1782

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Página clxiii - To wake the soul by tender strokes of art, To raise the genius, and to mend the heart, To make mankind, in conscious virtue bold, Live o'er each scene, and be what they behold...
Página xxxix - ... a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal: His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest; Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
Página xxxix - Biron they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest...
Página lvi - When in the frefli and beauteous fields he may With various healthful pleafures fill the day ? If there be man (ye gods) I ought to hate, Dependance and attendance be his fate. Still let him bufy be, and in a crowd, And very much a flave, and very proud : Thus he perhaps powerful and rich may grow; No matter, O ye gods I that I'll allow : But let him peace and freedom never fee ; Let him not love this life, who loves not me.
Página xxiii - ... but with as much secrecy as possible, to unroof the several houses of those who were to file those bills ; and, accordingly, a great number of them began some hours before it was day, and by eight o'clock in the morning the slates were totally stripped off, and several of the inhabitants, men, women, and children, had run directly from their beds into the streets ; some of them, in their fright, conceiving (it being then war...
Página xvii - Sons are ftupid as the Heir. In Senates, at the Bar, in Church and State, Genius is vile, and Learning out of date. Is this— O Death to think ! is...
Página xvii - Learning's unfafhionable paths to tread ; To bear thofe labours, which our Fathers bore, That Crown with-held, which they in triumph wore ? When with much pains this boafted Learning's got, *Tis an affront to thofe who have it not. In fome it caufes hate, in others fear, Inftructs our foes to rail, our friends to fneer; With prudent hafte the worldly-minded fool, Forgets the, little which he learn'd at...
Página xxii - I was proceeding on this business, and the time had come for the several inhabitants to remove from their houses, some who were lodgers or roomkeepers only, and had not by the Act a moment to continue their possession after the money adjudged to their landlords had been paid to, and the deeds of conveyance executed by them, having conceived that they had a right to continue their possession six months after, and this having come to my knowledge on a Saturday, and that no less than fourteen bills...
Página ix - I had been intrufted, and thinking myfelf in honour bound to repair the lofs (which was fome coft in the caufe) out of my own fcanty finances, and recollecting what had been faid to me by a very celebrated witty genius, on reading a tranflation by me of one of the odes of...
Página lii - For Modes of Faith let gracelefs zealots fight ; His can't be wrong whofe life is in the right...

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