Papers of the Manchester Literary Club, Volumen5

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H. Rawson & Company, 1879

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Página 221 - True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, As those move easiest, who have learned to dance : 'Tis not enough no harshness gives offence, The sound must seem an echo to the sense. Soft is the strain when zephyr gently blows...
Página 224 - Calamy, with several living authors who have published discourses of practical divinity. I no sooner saw this venerable man in the pulpit, but I very much approved of my friend's insisting upon the qualifications of a good aspect and a clear voice; for I was so charmed with the gracefulness of his figure and delivery, as well as with the discourses he pronounced, that I think I never passed any time more to my satisfaction. A sermon repeated after this manner is like the composition of a poet in...
Página 91 - Or call up him that left half told The story of Cambuscan bold, Of Camball, and of Algarsife, And who had Canace to wife, That own'd the virtuous ring and glass, And of the wondrous horse of brass, On which the Tartar king did ride...
Página 80 - ... to tak a drink Of the spring that ran sae clear; And down the stream ran his gude heart's blood, And sair she gan to fear. 'Hold up, hold up, Lord William,' she says, 'For I fear that you are slain!
Página 163 - Museum (if you could live long enough), and remain an utterly 'illiterate,' uneducated person; but that if you read ten pages of a good book, letter by letter, - that is to say, with real accuracy, - you are for evermore in some measure an educated person.
Página 209 - Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds...
Página 74 - With that there came an arrow keen Out of an English bow, Which struck Earl Douglas to the heart, A deep and deadly blow : Who never spake more words than these — " Fight on, my merry men all ; For why, my life is at an end ; Lord Percy sees my fall.
Página 221 - Tis not enough no harshness gives offence, The sound must seem an echo to the sense. Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, • The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar. When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow; Not so, when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.
Página 46 - Nature, to the range Of planets, suns, and adamantine spheres, Wheeling unshaken through the void immense ; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene, With half that kindling majesty, dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of...
Página 7 - I stood checked for a moment ; awe, not fear, fell upon me ; and, whilst I stood, a solemn wind began to blow — the saddest that ear ever heard. It was a wind that might have swept the fields of mortality for a thousand centuries.

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