Murray's English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best Writers ... with a Few Preliminary Observations on the Principles of Good Reading, Improved by the Addition of a Concordant and Synonymising Vocabulary ... the Words ... are Divided, Defined and Pronounced According to the Principles of John Walker ...

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Jas. B. Smith, 1822 - 304 páginas
 

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Página 266 - Join voices all ye living Souls: Ye Birds, That singing up to Heaven-gate ascend, Bear on your wings and in your notes his praise. Ye that in waters glide, and ye that walk The earth, and stately tread, or lowly creep; Witness if I be silent, morn or even, To hill, or valley, fountain or fresh shade, Made vocal by my song, and taught his praise. Hail universal Lord, be bounteous still To give us only good ; and if the night Have gather'd aught of evil, or conceal'd, Disperse it, as now light dispels...
Página 285 - What time the daisy decks the green, Thy certain voice we hear; Hast thou a star to guide thy path, Or mark the rolling year? Delightful visitant ! with thee I hail the time of flowers, And hear the sound of music sweet, From birds among the bowers.
Página 291 - With light and heat refulgent. Then Thy sun Shoots full perfection through the swelling year: And oft Thy voice in dreadful thunder speaks : And oft...
Página 197 - Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth.
Página 258 - And darkness and doubt are now flying away ; No longer I roam in conjecture forlorn. So breaks on the traveller, faint, and astray, The bright and the balmy effulgence of morn. See Truth, Love, and Mercy, in triumph descending, And nature all glowing in Eden's first bloom ! On the cold cheek of Death smiles and roses are blending, And Beauty immortal awakes from the tomb.
Página 224 - He that holds fast the golden mean And lives contentedly between The little and the great Feels not the wants that pinch the poor Nor plagues that haunt the rich man's door, Imbittering all his state.
Página 96 - How can it enter into the thoughts of man, that the soul, which is capable of such immense perfections, and of receiving new improvements to all eternity, shall Fall away into nothing almost as soon as it is created ? Are such abilities made for no purpose? A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass : in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and, were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Página 262 - CM \yHEN all thy mercies, O my God, My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view I'm lost In wonder, love, and praise . 2 O how shall words with equal warmth The gratitude declare, That glows within my ravish 'd heart!
Página 270 - THE Lord my pasture shall prepare, •And feed me with a shepherd's care ; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye ; My noonday walks he shall attend, And all my midnight hours defend.
Página 288 - Around, how wide ! how deep extend below ! Vast chain of being ! which from God began, Natures ethereal, human, angel, man, Beast, bird, fish, insect, what no eye can see, No glass can reach ; from infinite to thee, From thee to nothing.

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