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DALRYMPLE, Sir John, Memoirs of Great
Britain and Ireland, i. 128.
DANCASTLE, Thomas, Pope's amanuensis,
iii. 119 n. 5, 154 n. 4.

DANTE, hell marked into divisions,'i. 186
n. 2; 'no flame,' 472 n. 2 ; sculpture ex-
hibiting motion, iii. 105 n. 1: Statius, 92
n. 5.
DANTON, Georges Jacques, iii. 395 n. 4.
DARWIN, Charles, Académie des Sciences
and Evolution, i. 233 n. 3; composed on
backs of old proofs, &c., iii. 203 n. 1;

fiddle-faddle of geology and the occult
sciences,' i. 409 n. 3.

DARWIN, Erasmus, Botanic Garden and
Blackmore's Creation, ii. 243 n. 2; Sheffield's
epitaph, 178.
DASHWOOD, Sir Francis, ii. 360 n. 2.
DASHWOOD, Kitty, ii. 312, 314.
DATI, Carlo, i. 94.
DAUBIGNY, Lady, i. 253 n. 5, 261, 263,
265.

DAVENANT, Sir William, ‘Bilboa' in first
draft of The Rehearsal, i. 369, 483; coup-
lets, 81 n. 2; Cowley's verses to him, 38;
Dryden's favourite author, 425; D.'s qua-
trains and Gondibert, 338, 425, 431 ; poet-
laureate, 340; saved by Milton, 129; Shake-
speare, taught Dryden to admire, 341 n. 2;
Tempest, 341.
DAVENANT, Dr. Charles, ii. 122.
Davies, Sir John, Nosce Teipsum, i. 293
n. 3; reasoned in rhyme, 469.

DAVIES, Thomas, author generated by
corruption of bookseller,' i. 339 n. 6; Con.
duct of the Allies, might have written, iii.
19 n. 6; obscenity of English tragedy, ii.
219 n. 3.
DAVIES, —,

the old actor, ii. 217 n. 5.
Davis, Dr., i. 107.
DEANE, Admiral, the regicide, iii. 3 n. 3.
DEANE, Colonel, iii. 261 . 3.
DEANE, Mr., a priest, Pope's tutor, iii. 86.
DEANS, in Devonshire, ii. 300.
DEATH, thinking constantly of, iii, 29 n, 1.
Decent, iii. 336 n. 1.
DEFOE, Daniel, glass-houses, ii. 399 n. 2;
kidnapping to American plantations, 3??
n. 2; Robinson Crusoe, 'wished longer,
184 n. 1 ; storm of Nov. 26, 1703, ii. 130
n. 5; What is everybody's business is no-
body's business, iii. 181 n. 5.
De Guiana Carmen Epicum, i. 192 n. 4.
De gustibus non est disputandum, ii. 217.
DELANY, Mrs. Mary, Beggar's Opera and
Handel, ii. 278 n. 2; Granville's niece, 288
n. 1; Hammond's Elegies, 312 th 5; Orrery's
Remarks on Swift, iii. 67; Pope's ' Atossa,'
272 ; Swift's personal appearance, 56 n. 1.
DELANY, Dr. Patrick, account of him, iii.
67; Observations on Orrery's Remarks on
Swift, ib. ; Swift, giving advice to, 59; S.'s
character, 63; S.'s marriage, believed in, 43,

69; S.'s reception in Ireland, 26; S.'s secret
reading of prayers, 55.

DELAVAL, Sir Francis, iii. 429 n. 3.
DE LA VALTERIE, Iliad, translated, iii. 114
Deliciae Poetarum Scotorum, i. 12 n. 4.

DEMOSTHENES, i. 412.
DENHAM, Sir John, account of himself, i.
70 n. 2 ; Anatomy of Play, 71 n. 2; arrest,
order for his, 74 n. 2; Aubrey, acquaintance
with, 74 n. 1; birth, &c., 70; burlesque,
grave, 76; Butler, lampooned by, 72 r. 3,
74 n. 5, 75, 83 ; 'concatenated metre,' 81;

Cooper's Hill, published, 72; criticized,
77-9; four celebrated lines, 78; imitations
of it, 78 n. 1 ; praised by Dryden, 77 %. 4:
78; parodied by Pope, 78 n.4; Pope, praised
by, 77 n. 4, 78 n. 2; Pi's Windsor Forest
derived from it, iii. 225; reported not bis
own, i. 72 ; Swift's Apollo's Edict, 78 n. 4;

couplets, 81, 419; Davenant's Gondi
bert, parodies, 76, 425 n. 3; death and burial,
75; dreaming young man,' 70; Dryden,
praised by, 79 n. 7, 293 n. 6; Duke of York,
conveys to France, 73 ; Elegy on Cowley, 76,
77, iii. 66 n. 2 ; estates sold by Parliament,
i. 74; Evelyn on him, 74 n. 3; eye, his, 7°
n. 1; Farnham Castle, 71; France, exile in

,
73; gaming, 70, 71; imprisonment, 72 11. 6;
King's correspondence, carries on, 72, 73;
Lincoln's Inn, 70; lofty Denham,' 17 4. 7;
lunacy, 75, 82 ; 'majestic Denham,' 79 92.7;
293 n. 6; marriage, 75, 82; ‘merry fellow,
75; metrical version of Psalms, 75; Of
Justice, 74, 82 n. 6; Of Prudence, 74; OF
Fanshaw's translation of Pastor Fido, 77:
order of the Bath, 74; Oxford, retreats to,
72 ; Pembroke, Earl of, entertained by, 74;
Peters, Hugh, 72 ; Poland, embassy to, 73;
Pope, imitated by, 76; P., praised by, 174.7
79 nn. ; rhymes, 81, 82; Sessions of Poets

,
satirized in, 12 n. 3; sheriff of Surrey, 7i; simile
of poets and eastern kings, 76 ; Sophy, 71;
Speech of the close Committee, 76; strength,
79,293 ; surveyor of King's Buildings, 74;
Swift's Battle of the Books, 79 n. 3; transla-
tion, 77, 79, 373 ; translations, Cato Major,
73, 79; t. second book of Aeneid, 71, 79;
Trinity College, Oxford, 70 n. 6; triplets

,
81 ; versification, 22, 80, 251, 333 ; Virgil

,
burlesqued, 71 n. 3; 'Wood's account of him,
70;

quotations, Cooper's Hill, 78, 80 ;
Destruction of Troy, 81, 82; Elegy on Cowley,
56, 80 ; Journey into Poland, 73 n. 6; 0x
Fanshaw's Translation of Pastor Fido, 77
On Mr. John Fletcher's Works, 76, 82 th, 2;
On Strafford, 80.
DENHAM, Sir John, the poet's father, i. 70.
DENHAM, Lady, the poet's wife, i. 83, 83.
DENHAM, Miss, the poet's sister, i. 380
DENNIS, John, Addison's Cato, ii. 99, 102
133, iii

. 106; Appius' in Essay on Criti-
cism, 95 n. 6; Blackmore's Prince Arthur,

n. I.

n. 6.

n. 4.

attacks, ii. 238; B.'s Creation, praises, 243 ; Dissipation, iii. 338 n. 2.
B., praised by, 239 ; Blenheim, celebrated,

DITCHLEY, i. 219.
186 n. 2; Chevy Chase and Addison, 147; Divaricate, i. 422 11. 4.
coffee-house wits, 307 n. 6; Congreve's Divorce Bills, ii. 322 n. 4.
Way of the World, 223 n. 6; criticism, Dixon, Canon R. W., iii. 360.
his, Johnson praises, 133; Landor ranks it Doble, Mr. C. E., anonymous publication
above Dryden's, 144 n. 4, iii. 222 n. 2; of Essay on Man, iii. 163 n. I; Pope's Sober
Southey praises it, ii. 144 n. 4;. · Dryden, Advice and Thomas Bentley, 276; Johnson's
flatters, i. 396 n. 5; D. and Milton, 359 n. 2 ; Cicero, i. 320 n. 2; Walmesley's letters to
Hill's lines on him, ii. 133 n. 6; horseplay Duckett, ii. 23.
in his raillery,'144; Italian opera, 165; Para- Dobson, William, account of him, iii. 170
dise Lost, i. 198; Phaedra, intended tragedy, n. 3 ; Latin version of Paradise Lost, i. 191
ii. 16; poetical justice, 99, 134, 135; n. 4, iii. 170; 1. v. of Prior's Solomon and
Pope, their enmity, 102, iii. 91,95,98, 104, 105, Pope's Essay on Man, 170; Pope's learning,
106, 113 n. 2, 129, 136, 151; P.'s deformity, 216.
jeers at, 97; Essay on Criticism, attacks, DOBSON, Mr., Waller's Schoolmaster, i. 249
95-8; Prol. Sat., attacked in, 204 n. 4; Rape
of the Lock, criticizes, 151, 234, 235; Temple of DODINGTON, George Bubb, Lord Melcombe,
Fame, 104 n. 3, 105; Windsor Castle, 104 described by Thomson and Walpole, iii. 287
n. 3, 225;

Remarks on Cato, ii. 134-44; n. 2; ‘Dodingtonian smoothness,' ib.; Dorset-
Remarks upon Mr. Pope's Homer, &c., iii. shire seat, 376, 377, 387; Johnson, offered
104 n. 3; Rowe, describes, ii. 74 n. 1; friendship to, 287 n. 2 ; . Love thy country,'
Savage's epigram on him, 362 ; Unity of &c., 387; Pope's. Bubo,'287 n. 2; Thomson's
Place, 140; Walsh and Pope, iii. 97 ; Wy- bad reading, 297; T.'s Summer dedicated
cherley and Pope, 91; W., praises, ii. 144 to him, 287; Young's patron, 372, 376,

377
DE QUINCEY, Pope, why a great poet, iii. DODSLEY, Robert, account of him, iii. 213
251 n. 5.

n. 7; Akenside's Pleasures of Imagination,
DERBY, Countess of, i. 93.

412; Collection of Poems, 333 n. 4, 345 n. 4,
DERING, Sir Edward, i. 239.

358 . I, 359, 423 4. 9, 424 4. 7, 435 4. ;
DERRICK, Samuel, Dryden's Fables, i. 408; Dyer's Fleece, 344; Gray's Elegy, printed,
Life of Dryden, 331, 332; presence of mind, 443; G.'s Progress of Poesy, not scholar
ii. 399 n. 1.

enough to understand, 436 n. 3; G.'s Prospect
DESAGULIERS, Dr., iii. 161 n, 2.

of Eton College, published, 433 n. 9; im-
Des CHAMPS, ii. 104.

prisoned by House of Lords, 181; Johnson's
DESCRIPTIVE POEMS, iii. 225.

London, published, 180 n. 4; Pope's charity,
Des FONTAINES, iii. 73.

213; P.'s copy for the press, 221; P.'s last
DESMARÊTS, i. 174 n. 2.

illness, 190; P.'s papers, 192; P. and War-
DEVENISH, Mr., ii. 74.

burton's first meeting, 167 n. 3; Public
DEVONSHIRE, first Duke of, ii. 30.

Virtue, 418 n. 2; Shenstone's friend and
DEVONSHIRE, third Duke of, ii. 30 n. 1. biographer, 353; Toyshop, 213 n. 7; Young's
DEVONSHIRE, fourth Duke of, iii. 444. Night Thoughts and Brothers published, 381,
DEVOTIONAL POETRY, i. 291-2, iii. 310. 395 n. 3, 397 n. 6.
See SACRED POETRY.

Dodsley's Miscellany, see DODSLEY, Collec-
DIBBEN, Thomas, ii. 203 n. 6.

tion of Poenis.
DIDACTIC POETRY, ii. 295.

Dolben, Sir Gilbert, i. 449 n. I.
Dies Irae, i. 234, 292 n. I.

DOLMAN, Miss, Shenstone's cousin, iii. 349
Digby, Sir Kenelm, i. 4, 377.
DIGBY, Hon. Mary, iii. 263.

DOLMAN, Rev. Mr., of Brome in Stafford-
Digby, Hon. Robert, Pope's epitaph, iii. 263. shire, iii. 349, 350.
Dignity of Kingship Asserted, i. 125 n. 6. DOMENICHI, Lodovico, i. 455.
DILETTANTI CLUB, ii. 360 n. 2.

Donaldson v. Beckett, iii. 284 n. 3.
DILLY, Charles, the bookseller, iii. 305 DONNE, Dr. John, Cowley borrows from
n. 3.

him, i. 57, 58, 68; Coleridge, praised by, 21
DILLY, Edward, the bookseller, xxv n. 2. n. 3; ‘Done, for not keeping accent, deserves
DINGLEY, Mrs., iii. 9, 23.

hanging,' 22 n. 2; Drury, Mrs., had never
DIODATI, Charles, i. 91 n. 9, 93 n. 2, 97. seen, 441 n. 3; Dryden's estimate, 19, 68 ;
DIODATI, John, i. 97.

'favourite poet of the time,' 58 n. 2 ; Lamb,
DIONYSIUS, iii. 236 n. 4.

praised by, 20 n. 2; metaphysical poet, 22,
DISSENTERS, Fund for education of minis- 68; Night, 33 ; philosophical allusions, i.
ters, iii. 411 n. 4; taught the graces of 23, 285 n. 1; Pope's estimate, 19 n. 3; P.'s
language, 306 ; ' teacher of a congregation' or versification of Satires, iii. 177; rugged-
• minister,' 307 n. 1.

ness, i. 22, 426; “Twin compasses' and Omar

n. 6.

n. 2.

Khayyam, 34 n. 2; wit, 19; quotations, 23-4, Italy, 303 ; tried for robbery, 304 1. 3 ; wit

,
26, 28, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 57.

306 n. 7.
DONNE, John, the younger, i. 425 n. 3. DORSET, Charles Sackville, second Duke of,
Don Quixote, applause for what he has see MIDDLESEX, Earl of.
omitted to write,' ii. 136 n. 1; Boiardo and DORSET, Lionel, seventh Earl and first
Ariosto, i.454 n.4; fees, ii. gon.4; Hudibras, Duke, confused with Charles, sixth Earl, i.
compared with, i. 209; hypocrite and bold- 309 n. 5, 340, ii. 181, 186, iii. 312 1. 6;
faced sinner, iii. 55 n. 2; licenser of plays, ii. Philips's verses to him, 312; Prior's dedica-
279 n. 2 ; 'may be found in descent from tion, i. 303 n. 2 ; Savage, compliments, ii

.
a king,' 180; Memoirs of Scriblerus, resem- 337 ; Young's dedication, iii. 372; "universal
blance to, iii. 182 ; pastoral poetry, i. 164 patron,' 312.
n. 2, iii. 318 n. 3; scholar's life, ii. 357 n. 1; DORSET, Thomas Sackville, first Earl of,
Sydenham, recommended by, 236; wished Gorbuduc, i. 415 n. 5, iii. 255 n. I.
longer,' i. 184 n. 1.

DOUGLAS, Rev. Dr. John, Bishop of Salis-
DORCHESTER, Catharine Sedley, Countess bury, iii. 19 n. 6.
of, i. 308 n. 3, ii. 173.

DOWDESWELL, William, Chancellor of the
DORMER, Mr., of Oxfordshire, i. 252. Exchequer, iii. 451 n. 2.
DORSET, Charles Sackville, sixth Earl of, DOWNE, Earls of, iii. 82.
Addison, praised by, i. 306 n. 7; affection of Downes, John, the prompter, Roscius
the public, 306 ; Anne, Princess, conducts to Anglicanus, Cowley's Cutter of Colemas
Nottingham, 306 ; 'best-good man with the Street, i. 14; Granville's British En.
worst-natured muse,' 307 n. 1, iii. 256 n. 1; chanters, ii. 289 n. 4; G.'s She Gallants, 290
birth, i. 303 ; Blackmore, satirized by, ii. 241
N. 2; Burnet, described by, i. 303 nn., 305 DRAKE, Dr., ii. 236 n. 1.
n. 3, 307 n. I; character, 303, 306; Charles II, DRAMA, attacked by Collier, ii. 220; Puri-
despised, 305 n. 3; confused with first Duke, tans, censured by, i. 365, ii. 219. See also
309 n. 5, 340 n. 4, ii. 181 n. 3, iii. 312 n. 6; THEATRE.
Corneille's Pompey, i. 282; death, 306; Do- DRAMATIC RHYME, i. 336, 337, 339, 414,
rinda, 308; drunken frolic, 303; Dryden,

436.
bounty to, 307, 384; D.'s Essay of Dramatic DRAPER, the bookseller, ii. 243, iii. 316
Poesy, character in, 307 n. 4, 340; D.'s Essay n. I.
on Satire dedicated to him, 385; D.'s flattery, DRAYTON, Michael, i. 467.
307, 308 n. I; D.'s funeral, 392 n. 1; dull in DRIDEN, John, the poet's cousin, i. 393
company, 303 n. 5; embassies to France,
305 ; 'failings had their beauties,' 304 n. 2, Drift, Adrian, Prior's secretary, ii, 180
ii. 10 n. 1; favourite of Charles II, i. 303 ; n. I, 199 n. 4.
favourite of William III, 306; fights against DRURY LANE THEATRE, Johnson's Pro-
Dutch, 304, 307 n. 4; garter, 306; gentle- logue on the opening, i. 243 7. 2. See
man of the bedchamber, 305; 'gentleman LONDON, Drury Lane.
had the better of the satirist,' 307 n. 5; DRYDEN, Charles, the poet's son, Chamber-
Halifax's patron, 309; 'holiday-writer,' 224 lain to the Pope, i. 393, 479; Juvenal, Sat.
n. 2; Howard, Edward, lampoons, 307 n. 5, vii, translated, 385 ; Dryden's funeral, 390;
308; Hudibras known at Court through

death, 393.
him, 204; inherits Earl of. Middlesex's es- DRYDEN, Lady Elizabeth, the poet's wife,
tates, 305 ; invincible indolence, 306 n. 3; see HOWARD, Lady Elizabeth.
longest composition, 307; lord chamberlain DRYDEN, Erasmus, the poet's father, i. 331.
of William III's household, 306; marriages, DRYDEN, Sir Erasmus, Bart., the poet's
305; Nell Gwynne, 305 n. 3; 'never in the grandfather, i. 331.
wrong,' 307; Parliament, enters, 303 ; patron Dryden, Erasmus Henry, the poet's son,
of genius, 306, 309 n. 5, ii. 42, 181; Pope's i. 393, 394 n. 1, 481.
epitaph, i. 307 n. 1, iii. 254 ; P.'s estimate, i. DRYDEN, John, Absalom and Achi.
224 n. 2, 308 n. I; P., quoted by, 306 n. 6; tophel, published, i. 373; attacked by Collier,
Prior's character of him, 303, 304 n. 2, 307 401 n. 5; Settle and Pordage, 374, 374 1.7;
nn., ii. 10 n.1; P.'s patron, 181, 186; Revolu- Johnson's criticism, 436; second part, share
tion, concurs in, i. 306; Rochester's epigrams in, 376, 437;

Addison's Cato, ii. 98
on him, 306, 307 n. 1, 355 n. 4, iii. 256 n. 1; n.5; A., drinks with, i. 389 n. 5; A.'s Fourik
R., praised by, i. 303 n. 8; Satires, little Georgic, ii. 83; advise, ready to, i. 396;
personal invectives, 307; 'Seven Bishops,' Albion and Albanius, 358; Alexander's
countenances, 305 ; Shadwell's laureateship, Feast, account of publication, 388, 480;
384 n. 2 ; Stepney's patron, 309; succeeds to best of all my poetry,' 456 n. 4; fortnight's
Earldom, 305; Swist, described by, 303 n. 5; labour, 456; Goldsmith's criticism, 456 r. 47
To all you Ladies now at land, 305; tossed Gray's praise, iii. 226 n. 7; Johnson's criti-
in open boat with William III, 306; travels in cism, i. 439, 456; Landor's disparagement,

n. 3.

compared with, iii. 227; P.'s praise, ii.
264; alexandrines, i. 63, 466 n. 7, 469;
All for Love, 361, ii. 396 n. 1 ; Almanzor,
see DRYDEN, Conquest of Granada; Am-
boyna, i. 355; Amphitryon, 363; Ana-
baptist, bred an, 33!; Annus Mira-
bilis, account of publication, 338; Johnson's
examination of it, 430-5; lines without
meaning, 461; mean image in it, 463; Pepys's
praise, 430 n. 2; Seneca, line borrowed
from, 435; Settle's ridicule, 352, 354;
' another and the same,' 418; Antony's dying
speech to Cleopatra, 361 n. 7; Aristotle's
rules for tragedy, 472-9; 'Art to blot,'
wanted, 424 n. 5, iii. 220 n. 5; Assignation,
i. 355; Astraea Redux, published, 334;

forced conceits, its, 426, 427; astrology,
216, 409, 481, ii. 218; Aurengzebe, I. 360;
ballads, fond of, 416 n. 4; Bayes' in Re-
hearsal, 337, 368, 369, 482; beaten for
another's rhymes,' 372; Beaumont and
Fletcher, 347, 474, 476, 478; birth, &c.,
331 ; Blakesley, 332 n. 1; blank verse, 200,
414; Boccaccio, borrows from, 455 ; Boling-
broke, visited by, 388 n. 5407; 'book-
learning,'417; 'borrows for want ofleisure,'iii.
166;. brink of meaning, treads upon,' i. 460;
Britannia Rediviva, 383 n. 1, 446; Buck-
ingham, his enemy, 368; Burnet, attacked
by, 365 n. 7, 379, 398 n. 4; Busby, Dr., re-
verenced, 332; Cambridge, 333; celestial
interposition in epic, 385; Chapman's versi-
fication, 415; character, described by Congreve,
394, 483; Charles II's 'character,' 364; C.,
neglected by, 386 n. 3; C., praises, 127 n. 3,
418, 439 n. 3, 464 n. 3; C., praised by, 347;
Chaucer, 414, 455; chops logic in heroic
verse,'352; Churchill's lines on him,469 n. 10;
City and Country Mouse, sheds tears over, ii.
182; 'claps of multitudes, placed happiness in,'
i. 346; Clarendon, verses to, 428; Cleomenes,
363 ; Cock and the Fox, 455; Collector of
Customs, 484; comedies, 459; comedy and
morality, 415; comic and tragic scenes,
alternated, 357; common words, 420 n. 2;
company, dull in, 397, iii. 201; Complaint
of Life,' i. 361; complaints, mostly general,
400; composition, rapidity of, 397; C., ne-
gligent in, 464; conceits in early productions,
333, 426, 428; confidence in himself, 371,
396; Congreve, familiarity with, 394, 395 ;
C's plays, ii. 215, 217 n. 2, 223 n. 6;
Conquest of Granada, account of, i. 348–50;
criticized by Clifford and Settle, 350-4;
noisy lines,' 462; ridiculed in Rehearsal,
349 n. 6;

conversation, sluggish in,
397; conversion to Roman Catholicism, 376;
c. satirized, 381; Corneille's Cinna and
Aristotle, 474 n. 2; corrections after publi-
cation, rarely introduced, 465 n. 2;
ruption of a poet, generation of statesman,'
339 n. 6; couplets, 443, 468, 469, iii. 250

Cowley's authority almost sacred to him,
333 n. 1; C.'s Chronicle, could have sup-
plied knowledge, not gaiety of, 38; Ci's
Cutter of Coleman Street, 14; C.'s Pindarics,
47 n. 4; Cowper's criticism, 464 n. 5; critic,
severe, the greatest help, 464 n. 6; criticism,
adverse, affected by, 355, 370, 400; c., his,
410, 418; C., 'father of English,' 410;
c., often precipitate, 217; C., too scholastic,
ii. 146; C., inferior to Dennis in, iii. 222
1, 2; Cymon and Iphigenia, i. 455; ‘Dali-
lahs of the Theatre,' 462; Davenant, colla-
borates with, 341; D.'s quatrains, influenced
by, 338, 425, 431; death, 389, 486;. dedi.
cations, his, 366, 399; d. to Dr. Busby, 332
n. 4; Charles II, 483; Earl of Chesterfield,
387; Lord Clifford, 387, 404 n. 4; Earl of
Dorset, 385; Marquis of Halifax, 364; Lord
Mulgrave, 361, 387, 410 n. 4; Duke of New-
castle, 347; Dukes of Ormond, 397 n. 4,
408 n. 2; Earl of Orrery, 336, 339; Earl of
Rochester, 354, iii. 368; Earl of Salisbury,
i. 365; Sir Charles Sedley, 355; Duchess of
York, 359;

Defence of an Essay of
Dramatic Poesy, 338 n. 2; degrees of B.A.
and M.A., 333 n. 4; Denham, more vigour
than, 465; D., praises, 79 n. 7, 293 n. 6;
Dennis, converses with, 14, 359 n. 2; D.,
flattered by, 396 n. 5; Derrick's Life, 331,
408; 'description of the ships,' 350; diffi-
culties, recommends works by representation
of, 338; discontent, 400; Don Sebastian,
362, 385; Donne, 19, 68; Dorset's bounty,
307, 384; dramatic criticisms, 347, 349, 412,
471; d. immorality, 399; d. poetry, dis-
continued, 363; d. rhyme, defends, 336-9,
414, 436; Duke's Company, the, 362 n. 5;
Duke of Guise, 335 n. 1, 357; Dutch, the,
attacks, 356, 359 n. 1, 387 n. 6; earlier
dramatists, 347, 424 n. 7; early poems, 332 ;
Elegy on Lord Hastings, 332, 334 n. 2;
Eleonora, 440-2; English poetry's debt to
him, 469; epic poem, designs, 361, 385;
e. poetry, 181 n. 5, 385 ; Epilogue to All for
Love, 362; E. to Conquest of Granada, 349;
E. to Husband his own Cuckold, 393 n. 6;
Epistle to John Driden, 456 n. 1; epitaph,
393 n. 2; e., Atterbury's proposed, 469
n. 10; Essay of Dramatic Poesy, 339, 340,
411, 412, 416, 465 n. 2; Essay of Heroić
Plays, 425 n. 2; Essay on Satire, 385 n. 7,
411 n. 5; Essay on Satire (verses), waylaid
and beaten as author, 371; see SHEFFIELD;
Evening's Love, 346 n. 2; Fables,
account of publication, 388; contract, &c.,
with Tonson, 405; description and criticism,
454 ; Pope's Chaucer, iii. 88; Preface, i. 401,
455; sale, 143 n. 5, 408; Faerie Queen,
211 n. 4; fishing, fond of, 408 n. 5; flattery,
his, 307, 359, 366,384, 387, 398, 399, 400 n.!;
French better critics, worse poets, 411 n. 3; F.
heroic verse, 421 n. 3; F. words, ases, 372

cor-

434; lass

n. 6, 463; Fresnoy's Art of Painting, trans- Francis Xavier, 378, 379; Life of Lucian,
lated, 386; friendship, his, 483; 'full-re- 372; Life of Plutarch, 333, 372; Life of
sounding line, 293, 465, iii. 232 ; funeral, Polybius, 372 ; Limberman, 356 n. 4, 362;
i. 389-92, 486; Garth, praises, ii. 58 n. 2; literature, extent of his, 416, 417; little
general topic, rarely writes on, i. 376; ' genius, Bayes,' 381 ; lived in familiarity with highest
every age has a kind of universal,' 2 n. 5; g., persons, 397; 'long majestic march,' 465, iii.
his vigorous, 457; g., superior to Pope in, 232 ; longitude, note referring to,
iii. 222 ; 'good rhymist but no poet,' i. 154; of offices, 384; love, his conception of, 458;
Gorboduc, wrongly describes, 415; grand, Love Triumphant, 365, 386 n. 5, 474 2. 2;
the, and the new, endeavoured after, 461; Mac Flecknoe, 383, iii. 241; Maimbourg's
Granville's Heroic Love, praises, ii. 290; Hist. of the League, i. 378, 483; marriage,
Gray's favourite poems, i. 455. n. 11,

and

393 ; Marriage Alamode, 354, iii. 368; H.
see GRAY; Guarini's Pastor Fido, 296 n. 1; A. and Maiden Queen, comic scenes acted
habits, 408; Halifax's lines on him, 385 as one play, i. 357 n. 3; Medal, The, 375,
n. I; hastiness of productions, 348, 356, 359, 437; memory, tenacious, 483; Milbourne,
423 n. 4, 465; 'heroic poem, greatest work attacked by, 388, 449-52;

Milton's blank
of human nature,' 170 n. 2; Heroic Stangas verse, 200; M.'s borrowings from Spenser and
on the Death of Oliver Cromwell, 270, 334, Chaucer, 190 n. 1, 194 n. 4; 'gives him leave
425; high value of own performances, 395; to tag his verses,' 358 n. 7; M., lines on,

Hind and Panther, date of publica- 95 n. 2, 198; M.'s rhymes, 162 n. 4; M.'s
tion, 380; described and criticized, 442-6 ; verdict on him, 154; M.'s view of nature, 178;
parodied in City and Country Mouse, 380, M., visits, 358 n. 7; Paradise Lost, praises,
443, 444 n. 1, ii. 42, 182; ridiculed by 198; "devil the hero,' 176 n. 3; ' flats among
Thomas Brown, i. 382; Supreme Being elevations,' 187; old words, 190 n. I;
called Pan, 445 ; sunk into neglect,' 446 ; mind, comprehensive by nature, 4577 m.,

historiographer, 383 n. 3, 405, 481; curious and active, 417; 'mixed wit,' sparing
Howard, Sir Robert, controversy with, 339; in, 41 n. 5; Mock Astrologer, see Evening's
H.'s Indian Queen, joined in, 336; Hudi- Love; modesty and laziness, 395, ii. 169
bras's versification, 217; human nature, pene- n. 10; money, wrote for, i. 372, 423, 447,
trating remarks on, 429; humane and com- iii. 220; monosyllables, i. 61 n. 2; 'monster
passionate, 483 ; Iliad, 388, 414, iii. of immodesty,' 365 n. 7; music, inarticulate
132, 253 n. I ; compared with Pope's, 222 n. 6; poetry, iii. 248; m., knew little about, i. 456
Pope's debt to it, 238; inaccuracies, i. n. 4; mythology, 427, 439, 462; 'name
415; income, 405, 484; inconstancy, charged necessary to success of every literary per-
with, 334; Indian Emperor, 336, 339, 350, formance, 372; nature, his view of, 178
430 n. 3, 436 ; inherited estate, 331, 484; n. 1; negligence, faults of, 464; New-
inhumanity, charged with, 394 n. 5, 483; castle, Duke and Duchess of, 347; night,
irreverence of religion, 404, 436; James II, description of, 337, 436, iii. 399 n. 6;
allusions in Virgil to, 387 n. 6; jealousy of Notes and Observations on the Empress of
rivals, 396; jest, unable to resist temptation Morocco, i. 343 n. 5; Ode on the death of
of, 463; Johnson's fondness for his memory, Mrs. Killigrew, Alexander's Feast, compared
iii. 223; J. gathered materials for his Life, i. with, 456 ; grotesque image, 463 n. 5; imi-
331 n. 1; Jo's leniency, 132 n. 1, 378; J.'s tated by Congreve, ii. 233; 'noblest ode lan-
mind formed to relish his excellencies, 330 guage has produced,' i. 439;- Ode on St.
n. 1; J., resemblance in his character to, Cecilia's Day (the first), 439; Ode on St. Ce-
417 n. 1, 457 n. 3; Jonson's dramatic criti. cilia's Day (the second), see Alexander's Feast;
cism, 411 n. 1; J.'s plots, 347; J.'s verses Oedipus, 356 n. 4, 362 ; .old religion, the,'
to Shakespeare, 355 n. 4; Juvenal, version 376 n. 3; ordination, solicited, 403 ; Ormond,
of, 385, 394, 447; King Arthur, 358 n. 6, sups with, 397 ; Ormond, Duchess of, present
364; King's Company, the, his agreement from, 408; Otway, 248 n. 1, 458; Ovid and
with, 362 n. 5, 365 n. 8, 367 n. 3; know- Claudian, 415, iii. 223 n. I ; Ovid's Epistles,
ledge, compared to Pope's, iii. 222; k. not due i: 372, 405 n. 3, 414 n. 3, 436; Oxford,
to books, i. 417; labour, not lover of, 413, lines in praise of, 333 ; Palamon and Arcite,
465, iii. 220; lampoons, seldom answered, i. 455; Panegyric on the Coronation, 334 1.7,
400 n. 5; landlord, kind, 332 n. 1 ; Landor's 428; Papists, writes against, 357; see DRYDEN,
lines on him, 416 n. 4, 458 n. 2; 'last Roman Catholics; pathos, wanting in, 458;
effort' of his poetry, 456 n. 3; Latin writers, payments received, Alexander's Feast,
remarks on, 415, 416; Laurus,' ii. 241 408; Cleomenes, 363 n. 5; Fables, 388, 406,
n. 2; learning, not equal to Milton's and 408 ; Ovid, 405 n. 3; Virgil, 387 n. 4; rate
Cowley's, i. 416; Lee, plays written in con- of payment, 405 n. 3; 250 guineas for 10,000
junction with, 357, 362; letter to his sons, verses, iii. 118n. I; see also DRYDEN, plays;
479; licentiousness of works, 398; Life, not pedantic ostentation,' i. 462; people,
written by contemporaries, 331; Life of l wrote for the, iii. 220; Pepys sees him, i. 335

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