The Cabinet Gallery and Compendium of Shakespeare's Dramatic Works

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George A. Smith
Gebbie & Company, 1890 - 238 páginas
 

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Página 200 - Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face, Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night. Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny What I have spoke: but farewell compliment! Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say 'Ay,' And I will take thy word: yet, if thou swear'st, Thou mayst prove false: at lovers' perjuries, They say, Jove laughs.
Página 205 - The younger sort take much delight in Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis ; but his Lucrece, and his tragedy of Hamlet Prince of Denmarke, have it in them to please the wiser sort, 1598.
Página 217 - If you are so fond over her iniquity, give her patent to offend ; for, if it touch not you, it comes near nobody.
Página 129 - The First Part of the Contention of the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster...
Página 208 - The beauties of this play impress themselves so strongly upon the attention of the reader, that they can draw no aid from critical illustration. The fiery openness of Othello, magnanimous, artless, and credulous, boundless in his confidence, ardent in his affection, inflexible in his resolution, and obdurate in his revenge ; the cool malignity of lago, silent in his resentment, subtle in his designs, and studious at once of his interest and his vengeance ; the soft simplicity of Desdemona, confident...
Página 208 - Of the feigned madness of Hamlet there appears no adequate cause, for he does nothing which he might not have done with the reputation of sanity. He plays the madman most, when he treats Ophelia with so much rudeness, which seems to be useless and wanton cruelty.
Página 46 - Biron they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest...
Página 14 - She was so well pleased with that admirable character of Falstaff, in The Two Parts of Henry the Fourth, that she commanded him to continue it for one play more, and to show him in love.
Página 61 - I cannot reconcile my heart to Bertram; a man noble without generosity, and young without truth ; who marries Helen as a coward, and leaves her as a profligate : when she is dead by his u'nkindness, sneaks home to a second marriage, is accused by a woman whom he has wronged, defends himself by falsehood, and is dismissed to happiness.
Página 113 - The lines given to the Chorus have many admirers; but the truth is, that in them a little may be praised, and much must be forgiven ; nor can it be easily discovered why the intelligence given by the Chorus is more necessary in this play than in many others where it is omitted.

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