The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides, Volumen3

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H.G. Bohn, 1848
 

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Página 36 - Sir. you do not know it to be good or bad till the judge determines it. I have said that you are to state facts fairly; so that your thinking. or what you call knowing a cause to be bad. must be from reasoning. must be from your supposing your arguments to be weak and inconclusive.
Página 306 - ... the assistance of one of the ablest lawyers in the kingdom ;' and he will read it to him (laughing all the time). He believes he has made this will ; but he did not make it: you, Chambers, made it for him. I trust you have had more conscience than to make him say, ' being of sound understanding ;' ha, ha, ha ! I hope he has left me a legacy. I'd have his will turned into verse, like a ballad.
Página 208 - Why, Sir, if you were to read Richardson for the story, your impatience would be so much fretted that you would hang yourself. But you must read him for the sentiment, and consider the story as only giving occasion to the sentiment.
Página 301 - ... paid to Johnson. One evening, in a circle of wits, he found fault with me for talking of Johnson as entitled to the honour of unquestionable superiority. " Sir," said he, " you are for making a monarchy of what should be a republic.
Página 35 - The first lines of this Prologue are strongly characteristical of the dismal gloom of his mind; which in his case, as in the case of all who are distressed with the same malady of imagination, transfers to others its own feelings. Who could suppose it was to introduce a comedy, when Mr Bensley solemnly began, Press'd with the load of life, the weary mind Surveys the general toil of human kind.
Página 174 - I from concealing her, that my wife had at that time almost as numerous an acquaintance in London as I had myself; and was, not very long after, kindly invited and elegantly entertained at Streatham by Mr.
Página 139 - tis all a cheat : Yet, fooled with hope, men favour the deceit ; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay : To-morrow's falser than the former day ; Lies worse, and, while it says, we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest.
Página 95 - But suppose now, Sir, that one of your intimate friends were apprehended for an offence for which he might be hanged." JOHNSON. " I should do what I could to bail him and give him any other assistance ; but if he were once fairly hanged I should not suffer.
Página 23 - The King was pleased to say he was of the same opinion; adding, "You do not think, then, Dr. Johnson, that there was much argument in the case." Johnson said, he did not think there was. "Why truly, (said the King,) when once it comes to calling names, argument is pretty well at an end.
Página 176 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.

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