Brand's Popular Antiquities of Great Britain: Faiths and Folklore; a Dictionary of National Beliefs, Superstitions and Popular Customs, Past and Current, with Their Classical and Foreign Analogues, Described and Illustrated, Volumen1

Portada
John Brand, Sir Henry Ellis, William Carew Hazlitt
Reeves and Turner, 1905 - 672 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 135 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, This bird of dawning singeth all night long : % And then, they say, no spirit dares stir abroad; The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike, No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.
Página 27 - Resolv'd to smooth his shaggy face, He sought the barber of the place. A flippant monkey, spruce and smart, Hard by, profess'd the dapper art ; His pole with pewter basons hung, Black rotten teeth in order strung, Rang'd cups, that in the window stood, Lin'd with red rags, to look like blood, Did well his threefold trade explain, Who shav'd, drew teeth, and breath'da vein.
Página 236 - So when a child, as playful children use, Has burnt to tinder a stale last year's news, The flame extinct, he views the roving fire — There goes my lady, and there goes the squire, There goes the parson, oh ! illustrious spark, And there, scarce less illustrious, goes the clerk ! REPORT • OF AN ADJUDGED CASE NOT TO BE FOUND IN ANY OF THE BOOKS.
Página 80 - ... follows that of whipping a blinded bear, which is performed by five or six men, standing circularly with whips, which they exercise upon him without any mercy, as he cannot escape from them because of his chain : he defends himself with all his force and skill, throwing down all who come within his reach, and are not active enough to get out of it, and tearing the whips out of their hands, and breaking them.
Página 316 - ... in all probability those common juggling words of "Hocuspocus," are nothing else but a corruption of " Hoc est corpus," by way of ridiculous imitation of the Priests of the church of Rome in their trick of transubstantiation.
Página 302 - If I beheld the sun when it shined, Or the moon walking in brightness ; And my heart hath been secretly enticed, Or my mouth hath kissed my hand : This also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge : For I should have denied the God that is above.
Página 249 - Stain all my soul, and wanton in my eyes. I waste the Matin lamp in sighs for thee, Thy image steals between my God and me, Thy voice I seem in...
Página 29 - OR, LAST IN HELL. WE two are last in hell ; what may we feare To be tormented or kept pris'ners here ? Alas ! if kissing be of plagues the worst, We'll wish, in hell we had been last and first.
Página 24 - Had all the morning held, now the second Time made ready, that day, in flocks are found In the Presence, and I (God pardon me) As fresh and sweet their Apparels be, as be Their fields they sold to buy them. For a king Those hose are, cry the flatterers ; and bring Them next week to the theatre to sell.
Página 18 - ... stripped naked, were pushed through the apertures, under a persuasion that, by such a process, the poor babes would be cured of their infirmity. As soon as the operation was over, the tree, in the suffering part, was plastered with loam, and carefully swathed up. If the parts coalesced and soldered together, as usually fell out, where the feat was performed with any adroitness at all, the party was cured ; but, where the cleft continued to gape, the operation, it was supposed, would prove ineffectual....

Información bibliográfica