The Works of Abraham Cowley, Volumen1

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G. Kearsley, 1806
 

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Página 144 - Nor amidst all these triumphs dost thou scorn The humble glow-worms to adorn, And with those living spangles gild (O greatness without pride !) the bushes of the field. Night, and her ugly subjects thou dost fright, And sleep, the lazy owl of night ; Ashamed and fearful to appear They screen their horrid shapes with the black hemisphere.
Página lxii - Begin the song, and strike the living lyre : Lo how the years to come, a numerous and well-fitted quire. All hand in hand do decently advance, And to my song with smooth and equal measure dance ; While the dance lasts, how long soe'er it be, My music's voice shall bear it company ; Till all gentle notes be drown'd In the last trumpet's dreadful sound.
Página lxxvi - Wash'd from the morning beauties' deepest red; An harmless flaming meteor shone for hair, And fell adown his shoulders with loose care; He cuts out a silk mantle from the skies, Where the most sprightly azure...
Página 56 - Gentle Henrietta then, And a third Mary next began, Then Joan and Jane and Audria, And then a pretty Thomasine, And then another Catherine, And then a long
Página 26 - In a true piece of Wit all things must be, Yet all things there agree. As in the Ark, joyn'd without force or strife, All Creatures dwelt; all Creatures that had Life.
Página 46 - IT was a dismal and a fearful night: Scarce could the Morn drive on th' unwilling light, When sleep, death's image, left my troubled breast By something liker death possessed.
Página xxx - This kind of writing, which was, I believe, borrowed from Marino and his followers, had been recommended by the example of Donne, a man of very extensive and various knowledge; and by Jonson, whose manner resembled that of Donne more in the ruggedness of his lines than in the cast of his sentiments.
Página 69 - The thirsty earth soaks up the rain, And drinks, and gapes for drink again. The plants suck in the earth, and are With constant drinking fresh and fair. The sea itself, which one would think Should have but little need of drink, Drinks twice ten thousand rivers up, So fill'd that they o'erflow the cup.
Página lxxxvi - ... buried in impurities as not to pay the cost of their extraction. The diction, being the vehicle of the thoughts, first presents itself to the intellectual eye; and if the first appearance offends, a further knowledge is not often sought. Whatever professes to benefit by pleasing must please at once. The pleasures of the mind imply something sudden and unexpected; that which elevates must always surprise. What is perceived by slow degrees may gratify us with the consciousness of improvement, but...
Página 9 - has been for some years past, though the execution has been accidentally diverted, and does still vehemently continue, to retire myself to some of our American plantations, not to seek for gold, or enrich myself with the...

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