Oriental tales, tr. into Engl. verse by J.Hoppner

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Página ix - He was inclined to shew an usurper and a murderer not only odious, but despicable ; he therefore added drunkenness to his other qualities, knowing that kings love wine like other men, and that wine exerts its natural power upon kings. These are the petty cavils of petty minds ; a poet overlooks the casual distinction of country and condition, as a painter, satisfied with the figure, neglects the drapery.
Página xv - Titian we must turn our eyes to find excellence with regard to colour, and light and shade, in the highest degree. He was both the first and the greatest master of this art. By a few strokes he knew how to mark the general image and character of whatever object he attempted; and pro'duced, by this alone, a truer representation than his master Giovanni Bellino, or any of his predecessors, who finished every hair. His great care was to express the general colour, to preserve the masses of light and...
Página xii - If .we examine with a critical view the manner of those painters whom we consider as patterns, we shall find that their great fame does not proceed from their works being more highly finished...
Página 3 - ... They bless'd their stars, and in they push'd; Fell to with eager haste, and wasted Ten cabbages for one they tasted. And now the Ass (to fulness fed) Cherish'd strange fancies in his head ; On Nature's carpet idly roll'd, .By care or prudence uncontroll'd; His pride froth'd up, his self conceit, And thus it bubbled forth—' How sweet, Prince of the branching antlers wide, The mirth-inspiring moments glide! How grateful are the hours of spring! What odours sweet the breezes bring ! The musky...
Página xv - His great care was to express the general color, to preserve the masses of light and shade, and to give by opposition the idea of that solidity which is inseparable from natural objects. When those are preserved, though the work should possess no other merit, it will have in a proper place its complete effect ; but where any of...
Página 2 - In honds of love so closely bound, That seldom were they separate found. The upland lawns when summer dried, They ranged the meadows side by side ; And when gaunt famine chased them thence, They overleap'd the garden fence, Dividing without strife or coil, Like ministers of state, the spoil.
Página xiv - ... proof. It is to Titian we must turn our eyes to find excellence with regard to colour, and light and shade, in the highest degree. He was both the first and the greatest master of this art. By a few strokes he knew how to mark the general image and character of whatever object he attempted; and produced, by this alone, a truer representation than his master Giovanni Bellini, or any of his predecessors, who finished every hair.
Página xiv - ... whole, whether it was the general composition, or the composition of each individual figure ; for every figure may be said to be a lesser whole, though in regard to the general work to which it belongs, it is but a part ; the same may be said of the head, of the hands, and feet. Though he possessed...
Página 5 - A proverb that, in sense, surpasses The brains combined of stags and asses : Yet, for I must thy perils trace, Sweet bulbul * of the long-ear'd race ! Soft soul of harmony ! yet hear ; If thou wilt rashly charm our ear, And with thy warblings, loud and deep, Unseal the leaden eye of sleep ; Roused by thy song, and arm'd with staves, The gard'ner, and a host of slaves, • The Persian word for Nightingale. To mourning will convert thy strains, And make their pastime of thy pains.
Página 4 - The Stag, half pitying, half amazed, Upon his old associate gazed ; " What ! hast thou lost thy wits ?" he cried, " Or art thou dreaming, open eyed ? Sing, quotha ! was there ever bred In any mortal ass's head So strange a thought ! But, no offence— What if we first remove from hence ; And talk, as erst, of straw and oats, Of scurvy fare, and mangy coats, Of heavy loads, or worse than those, Of cruel drivers, and hard blows ? For recollect, my gentle friend, We're thieves, and plunder is our end....

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