Lend Me Your Ears: Great Speeches in History

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William Safire
W. W. Norton & Company, 1997 - 1055 páginas
William Safire's invaluable and immensely entertaining Lend Me Your Ears established itself instantly as a classic treasury of the greatest speeches in human history. Selected with the instincts of a great speechwriter and language maven, arranged by theme and occasion, each deftly introduced and placed in context, the more than two hundred speeches in this compilation demonstrate the enduring power of human eloquence to inspire, to uplift, and to motivate. For this expanded edition Safire has selected more than twenty new speeches by such figures as President Bill Clinton, Senator Robert Dole, General Colin Powell, Microsoft's Bill Gates, the Dalai Lama, Edward R. Murrow, Alistair Cooke, the Buddha, and the late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. They prove that even in a digital age the most forceful medium of communication is still the human voice speaking directly to the mind, heart, and soul.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - PointedPundit - LibraryThing

My Favorite Speech Compendium Hands Down! This is my absolute favorite speeches collection. William Safire, the man who penned “nattering nabobs of negativism,” draws from the ages to illustrate the ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - jontseng - LibraryThing

A good complement to MacArthurs more Anglophile Penguin compilations. Leer comentario completo

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

AN INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS
19
Roman Empress Theodora Refuses to Flee
36
Lincoln Rededicates the Union at Gettysburg
49
Underground Fighter Menachem Begin Pledges
64
WAR AND REVOLUTION SPEECHES
79
Queen Elizabeth Inveighs against the Spanish Armada
85
An Indian Chief Pledges Help
91
Richard Price an English Cleric Hails the Revolutions
97
Theologian Karl Barth Preaches Deliverance by Faith
482
President Ronald Reagan Inveighs against the Sinfulness
492
The Exiled Dalai Lama Espouses a Philosophy of Compassion
503
INSPIRATIONAL SPEECHES
509
Mark Twain Reveals Stage Fright
519
Rockefeller Jr Sets Forth His Familys Creed
525
Reverend Martin Luther King Jr Ennobles
531
President William Jefferson Clinton Urges Memphis Churchgoers
538

Garibaldi Prepares Italys Guerrillas for Battle
104
Chief Joseph Surrenders
111
Lenin Defends Proletarian Dictatorship
121
Hitler Declares Germanys Intentions
127
Winston Churchill Braces Britons to Their Task
134
President Franklin D Roosevelt Asks Congress to Declare
141
Senator Eugene McCarthy Crystallizes Dissent
147
Israels Yitzhak Rabin Shakes Hands with His Lifelong Enemy
155
Mark Antony Urges Mourners to Vengeance over the Body
161
Edmund Burke Laments the Death of Marie Antoinette
167
Senator George Graham Vest Offers a Tribute to the Dog
174
Ralph Waldo Emerson Commemorates the Centennial
176
Jane Addams Praises George Washington
191
George Bernard Shaw Salutes His Friend Albert Einstein
206
President Richard M Nixon Defines Politician
219
President Boris Yeltsin of Russia Eulogizes Victims
232
A Youthful William Pitt the Elder Debates the Merits of Age
248
Senator Daniel Webster Backs the Union in His Reply
263
Abolitionist Charles Sumner Excoriates Two Senate Colleagues on
278
Job Pleads the Record of a Good Life against Gods
319
Novelist Emile Zola Turns His Libel Defense into
337
Defense Lawyer Clarence Darrow Answers
350
Soviet Dissident Anatoly Shcharansky Defies His Judges
364
and Later His Regicide Speak from the Scaffold
373
Rebel Richard Rumbold on the Gallows Attacks
379
President George Washington Delivers His Farewell
385
John Brown Has a Few Words to say about
394
General Douglas MacArthur Moves Congress with
401
President Dwight D Eisenhower Takes His Leave with
407
Speaker of the House James Wright Resigns
419
The Buddha Urges a Turning Away from Craving in
427
Saint Francis Preaches to the Birds
435
John Calvin Preaches on Suffering Persecution
446
Methodist John Wesley Asserts Free Grace to Deny
452
Chief Red Jacket Rejects a Change of Religion
461
Lincoln in His Second Inaugural Seeks to Heal
469
Evangelist Billy Sunday Preaches a Revival Sermon
475
LECTURES
545
First Female Member of Parliament Lady Astor Expounds on Women
563
Secretary of State Dean Acheson Explains Tensions
576
Presidential Aide Jack Valenti Recalls the Lessons Learned at the Center
591
Lord Byron Puts Poetic Passion into His Defense
614
Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison Admits
628
Susan B Anthony Argues for Womens Rights
636
Elder Statesman Bernard Baruch Offers Americas First Plan to Control
652
Exhorts AfroAmericans to Confront
668
Astronomer Carl Sagan Contemplates the Potential Selfdestruction of
681
Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan Argues That Male Domination
700
Broadcaster Edward R Murrow Despairs of the Future of
713
FCCs Newton Minow Excoriates Broadcasters for Failing to Serve
730
Historian Daniel J Boorstin Examines the Coverage of Dissent
739
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger of the New York Times Discusses Business
754
Author Salman Rushdie Cries Out from a LifeTrapped inside
769
John Winthrop Defines the Mission of Government Officials
788
HistorianLegislator Thomas Macaulay Calls on Parliament
805
Karl Marx Calls for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat
819
British Conservative Benjamin Disraeli Speaks
835
Democratic Candidate William Jennings Bryan Delivers His Cross
851
President Franklin D Roosevelts First Inaugural Instills Confidence
858
Judge Noah Sweat of Mississippi Shows How to Straddle a Fence with
878
President John F Kennedy in His Inaugural Takes Up the Torch for
893
President Richard M Nixon Rallies the Silent Majority to Support
907
Representative Barbara Jordan Makes the Constitutional Case for
920
Senator Edward M Kennedy Exhorts Fellow Democrats to Hold Fast
933
Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick Blasts the San Francisco
947
Henry Kissinger Warns against the Reemergence of Isolationism
962
President Mikhail Gorbachev of the Soviet Union Acknowledges
978
EOMMENCEMENT SPEEGHES
987
Humorist Art Buchwald Speaks to Law Graduates
1002
Governor Mario Cuomo Speaks over the Heads of the Graduates
1018
General Colin Powell Urges AfricanAmerican Students to Reject Racial
1031
PERMISSIONS
1045
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Acerca del autor (1997)

William Safire was born on Dec. 17, 1929. He attended Syracuse University, but dropped out after two years. He began his career as a reporter for The New York Herald Tribune. He had also been a radio and television producer and a U.S. Army correspondent. From 1955 to 1960, Safire was vice president of a public relations firm in New York City, and then became president of his own firm. He was responsible for bringing Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev together in 1959. In 1968, he joined the campaign of Richard Nixon as a senior White House speechwriter for Nixon. Safire joined The New York Times in 1973 as a political columnist. He also writes a Sunday column, On Language, which has appeared in The New York Times Magazine since 1979. This column on grammar, usage, and etymology has led to the publication of 10 books and made him the most widely read writer on the English language. William Safire was the winner of the 1978 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary. He is a trustee for Syracuse University. Since 1995 he has served as a member of the Pulitzer Board. He is the author of Freedom (1987), a novel of Lincoln and the Civil War. His other novels include Full Disclosure (1977), Sleeper Spy (1995) and Scandalmonger (2000). His other titles include a dictionary, a history, anthologies and commentaries.

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