The Practical Elocutionist: Or the Principles of Elocution ...

Portada
Robert S. Davis, 1850 - 58 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 51 - I hate him for he is a Christian : But more, for that, in low simplicity, He lends out money gratis, and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice. If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
Página 37 - For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth ; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband.
Página 58 - I call upon the honour of your lordships to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country to vindicate the national character.
Página 55 - When what to my wondering eyes should appear But a miniature sleigh and eight tiny reindeer. With a little, old driver so lively and quick I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick ; More rapid than eagles his coursers they came And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name.
Página 46 - Slowly and sadly we laid him down, From the field of his fame fresh and gory; We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone, But we left him alone with his glory.
Página 38 - When night, with wings of starry gloom, O'ershadows all the earth and skies, Like some dark beauteous bird, whose plume Is sparkling with unnumbered eyes : That sacred gloom, those fires divine, So grand, so countless, Lord, are Thine.
Página 51 - Forsake me not thus, Adam! witness, Heaven, What love sincere, and reverence in my heart, I bear thee, and unweeting have offended, Unhappily deceived ! Thy suppliant, I beg, and clasp thy knees ; bereave me not, Whereon I live, thy gentle looks, thy aid, Thy counsel, in this uttermost distress My only strength and stay ; forlorn of thee, Whither shall I betake me, where subsist...
Página 41 - In vain for him th' officious wife prepares The fire fair-blazing and the vestment warm; In vain his little children, peeping out Into the mingling storm, demand their sire, With tears of artless innocence. Alas! Nor wife nor children more shall he behold, Nor friends nor sacred home: on every nerve The deadly Winter seizes, shuts up sense, And, o'er his inmost vitals creeping cold, Lays him along the snows a stiffened corse, Stretched out and bleaching in the northern blast.
Página 53 - O visions blest ! Though worthless our conceptions all of Thee, Yet shall Thy shadowed image fill our breast, And waft its homage to Thy Deity. God ! thus alone my lowly thoughts can soar ; Thus seek Thy presence — Being wise and good ! 'Midst Thy vast works admire, obey, adore ; And when the tongue is eloquent no more, The soul shall speak in tears of gratitude.
Página 29 - It is pleasant to be virtuous and good; because that is to excel many others: it is pleasant to grow better; because that is to excel ourselves: it is pleasant to command our appetites and passions, and to keep them in due order, within the bounds of reason and religion; because this is empire: nay, it is pleasant even to mortify and subdue our lusts; because that is victory.

Información bibliográfica