Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

OR,

THE SETTLERS IN THE WOODS.

BY JOHN GALT, Esq.

FAS., Hon. LS, P., HON. NHS, M., &c.

AUTHOR OF “ THE ANNALS OF THE PARISH,"

“ THE AYRSHIRE LEGATEES,” &c.

“I ran it through, even from my boyish days,
Wherein I spoke of most disastrous chances,
Of moving accidents by flood and field,
And with it all my travel's history."

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

LONDON:
HENRY COLBURN AND RICHARD BENTLEY,
8, NEW BURLINGTON STREET.

LONDON : PRINTED BY SAMUEL BENTLEY,

Dorset Street, Fleet Street.

PREFACE.

The Public have been pleased to regard the Author's endeavours to endow his imaginary autobiographies with a language characteristic of the supposed narrators, as among the qualities by which he has best merited their favour. In this instance, he has attempted to write as a humbly-educated Scotchman, of a particular temperament, who has been sometime in the United States, would probably have donem a glossary is subjoined.

The principal portion of the first part is made up from a personal narrative, and the peculiarities of the narrator resemble those of a singular, but worthy man. Some of his original letters are given in the Appendix as curiosities, and because they have been made use of in this work, and treat with feeling and sagacity of an impressive topic.

nesee

Travellers who have visited the Genesee country, will probably recognise in Judiville a shadowy and subdued outline of the history and localities of Rochester. * The author having recently superintended a Colonial experiment of great magnitude, it may be imagined that in Judiville he has described his own undertaking. This is not the case ; for the narrative embraces the substance of his knowledge, whether obtained by. inquiry, observation, or experience. The subject is more important than novels commonly treat of.-A description, which may be considered authentic, of the rise and progress of a successful American settlement, cannot but be useful to the emigrant who is driven to seek a home in the unknown wilderness of the woods. The privations are not exaggerated, nor is the rapidity with which they may be overcome. The book, therefore, though written to amuse, was not altogether undertaken without a higher object.

« AnteriorContinuar »