Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

method of communication we call intellec- heart of man to conceive; yet, what we can tual vision, as something analogous to the easily conceive, will be a fountain of unsense of seeing, which is the medium of our speakable and everlasting rapture. All acquaintance with this visible world. And created glories will fade and die away in his in some such way can God make himself presence. Perhaps it will be my happithe object of immediate intuition to the ness to compare the world with the fair blessed; and as he can, it is not improbable exemplar of it in the Divine Mind; perthat he will, always condescending, in the haps, to view the original plan of those circumstances of doing it, to the weakness wise designs that have been executing in a and proportion of finite minds. His works long succession of ages. Thus employed but faintly reflect the image of his perfec- in finding out his works, and contemplating tions: it is a second-hand knowledge: to their Author, how shall I fall prostrate and have a just idea of him, it may be necessary adoring, my body swallowed up in the imto see him as he is. But what is that? It mensity of matter, my mind in the infiniis something that never entered into the tude of his perfections!

THE END.

[ocr errors][merged small]

.

[ocr errors]

.

.

No.

No.
ABIGAILS, (male) in fashion among the ladies 55 Aglaus, his story told by Cowley

• 610
Absence in conversation, a remarkable instance Agreeable man, who

280
of it in Will Honeycomb
77 The art of being agreeable in company

386
The occasion of his absence
77 Albacinda, her character

144
And means to conquer it
77 Alexander the great, wry-necked

32
The character of an absent man out of Bruyere 77 His artifice in his Indian expedition

127
The absence of lovers, death in love

241 His answer when asked if he would not be a
How to be made easy

241 competitor for the prize in the Olympic
Abstinence, the benefits of it
195

157
Academy for politics

305 Wherein he imitated Achilles in a piece of
The regulations of it

305
cruelty, and the occasion of it

· 337
Acasto, his agreeable character
386 His complaint to Aristotle

379
Accompts, their great usefulness
174 Allegories, like light to a discourse

. 421
Acetus, his character
422 Eminent writers faulty in them

421
Acosta, his answer to Limborch, touching the The reception the Spectator's allegorical writ-
multiplicity of ceremonies in the Jewish ings meet with from the public

501
213 Allusions, the great art of a writer

• 421
Acrostic, piece of false wit, divided into simple

Almighty, his power over the imagination 421
and compound
60 Aristotle's saying of his being

465
Act of deformity, for the use of the Ugly Club
17 Amanda, her adventures

375
Action, the felicity of the soul .
116 Amaryllis, her character.

- 144
A threefold division of our actions
213 Amazons, their commonwealth

433
No right judgment to be made of them 174 How they educated their children

434
A necessary qualification in an orator 541 Their wars

434
Tully's observations on action adapted to the They marry their male allies

434
British Theatre
541 Ambition never satisfied

27, 256
Actions, principles of, two in man
588 The occasion of factions

125
Actor, absent, who so called by Theophrastus 541 By what to be measured

188
Admiration, one of the most pleasing passions 237 Many times as hurtful to the princes who are
When turned into contempt
340 led by it, as the people

200
Short-lived
256 Most men subject to it

219, 224
A pleasing motion of the mind
413 Of use when rightly directed

219
Adversity, no evil in itself
237 The end of it

. 255
Advertisement of an Italian chirurgeon
22 The effects of it in the mind

256
From St. James's Coffee-house
24 Subjects us to many troubles

• 257
From a gentleman that teaches birds to speak 36 The true object of a laudable ambition

257
From another that is a fine flesh painter 41 Various kinds of it

• 570
From Mr. Sly, the haberdasher
187 Laudable

613
About the Lottery ticket
191 Americans, their opinions of souls

56
Advice: no order of persons too considerable Exemplified in a vision of an American 56
to be advised
34 Used painting instead of writing

416
In what manner to be given to a faulty friend 385 Amity between agreeable persons of different
Usually received with reluctance

512
sexes dangerous

- 400
Adulterers how punished by primitive christians 579 Amoret, the jilt, reclaimed by Philander 401
Affectation, a greater enemy to a fine face than Ample, (Lady) her uneasiness and the reason
the small-pox
35

32
It deforms beauty, and turns wit into absurdity 38 Amusements of life, when innocent, necessary

93
Found in the wise man as well as the coxcomb 38 Anacharsis, the Corinthian drunkard, à saying
The way to get clear of it
38 of his

569
The misfortune of it

404 Anagram, what, and when first produced 69
Described

460 Anatomy, the Spectator's speculation on it 543
Affiction and sorrow not always expressed by Ancestry, how far honours is to be paid to 612

95 Ancients in the east, their way of living - . 415
True affliction labours to be invisible
95 Andromache, a great fox-hunter

57
Amictions, how to be alleviated

501 Animals, the different make of every species 120
Age rendered ridiculous
6 The instinct of brutes

120
How contemned by the Athenians and re Exemplified in several instances

. 120
spected by the Spartans
6 God himself the soul of brutes

121
The unnatural misunderstanding between The variety of arms with which they are pro-
age and youth
153 vided by nature

121
The authority of an aged virtuous person pre Anne Boleyn's last letter to King Henry VII. 397
ferable io the pleasures of youth
153 | Annihilation, by whom desired

210
A comfortable old age the reward of a well The most abject of wishes

210
spent youth

260 | Answers to several letters at once 581, 619
The authority assumed by some people on Anthony, (Mark) his witty mirth commended
the account of it
336 by Tully

386
435

[ocr errors]

of it

tears

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

No.

No.
Antipathies, a letter about them

Two unanswerable arguments against it 389
Anxieties, unnecessary, the evil of them and In what manner atheists ought to be treated 389
the vanity of them
615 Atheists, great Zealots

185
,
244 And bigots

185
Their opinions

185
frequenied, and for what purposes 223
Apothecary, his employment

· 195
his friendships

385
Apparitions, the creation of weak minds

55

55
Appearances, the veneration of respect paid to 110 | Avarice, the

original of it

360 At war with luxury
Things not to be trusted for them
. 464 Its officers and adherents

55
Appetites, sooner moved than the passions 208 Comes to an agreement with luxury

55
The imcumbrances of old age
260 Audience, the gross of, of whom composed

502
Applause, (public) its pleasure

449 The vicious taste of our English audiences 502
Censure and applause should not mislead us 610 Audiences, at present void of common sense 13, 290
April, (the first of) the merriest day in the year 47 August and July, (months of) described 425
Month of, described

425 Augustus, his request to his friends at his death 317
Arabella, (Mrs.) the great heiress, the Specta His reproof to the Roman bachelors

528
tor's fellow-traveller
132 His saying of mourning for the dead

575
Verses on Arabella's singing
443 Aurelia, her character

15
Araspas and Panthea, their story out of Xeno Author, the necessity of his readers being ac-
pho

564 quainted with his size, complexion, and
Architecture, the ancients' perfection in it 415

temper, in order to read his works with
Greatness of the manner how it strikes the
fancy

415
Of the manner of both ancients and moderns 415 The expedient made use of by those who
Concave and convex figures have the great-

write for the stage

51
TS est air

415 In what manner one author is a mole to an-
Every thing that pleases the imagination in other

124
it is either great, beautiful, or new

415 Wherein an author has the advantage of an
Aretine, made all the princes of Europe his

artist
tributaries

23 The care an author ought to take of what he
Argument, rules for the management of one 197 writes

166
Argumentum Basilinum, what

A story of an atheistical author

- 166
Socrates's way of arguing
239 Authors, for what most to be admired

355
In what manner managed by states and com Their precedency settled according to the
munities
239 bulk of their works

529
Argus, his qualifications and employments un-
der Juno
250 BABEL, (tower of)

415
Arietta, her character -

11 Bacon, (Sir Francis) his comparison of a book
Her fable of the lion and the man, in answer well written

19
to the story of the Ephesian matron 11 His observation upon envy

19
Her story of Inkle and Yarico

11 Prescribes his reader à poem or prospect, as
Aristinætus, his letters, some account of them 238 conducive to health

411
Aristippus, his saying of content

574 What he says of the pleasures of taste 447
Aristotle, his observations upon the lambic verse 31 His extraordinary learning and parts 554
Upon tragedies

40, 42 Bacon-flitch at Whichenovre, in Staffordshire,
His account of the world
166 who are entitled to it

607
The inventor of syllogism
239 Several demands for it.

• 608
His definition of an entire act of epic poetry 267 Bags of money, a sudden transformation of them
His sense of the greatness of the action in a

into sticks and paper

3
poem; his method of examining an epic Bamboo, (Benjamin, the philosophical use he
poem

273 resolves to make of a shrew of a wife 482
An observation of that critic's
273 Bankruptcy, the misery of it

428, 456
One of the best logicians in the world 291 Bantum, (Ambassador of) his letter to his mas-
His division of a poem
297 ter about the English

557
Another of his observations

297 Baptist Lully, his prudent management 29
His observations on the fable of an epic poem 315 Bareface, his success with the ladies-reason
Aristus and Aspasia, a happy couple

156
Arm, (the) called by Tully the orator's weapon 541 Bar-oratory in England, reflections on it 407
Arsinoe, the first musical opera on the English Basilius Valentinus, and his son, their story 426
stage

18 Bawdry, never writ but where there is a dearth
Art of criticism, the Spectator's account of that of invention

51
poem

253 Bawdy-houses frequented by wise men, not out
Works of art defective to entertain the ima of wantonness but stratagem

190
gination
414 Baxter, (Mr.) his last words

445
Receive great advantage from their likeness More last words

445
to those of nature
414 What a blessing he had

598
The design of it
541 Bayle, (Mr.) what he says of libels

451
Artillery, the invention and first use of it, to Beards in former ages a type of wisdom 331
whom ascribed by Milton

333 Instances of homage heretofore paid to beards 331
Artist, wherein he has the advantage of an au Time the beard flourished most in this nation 331
thor

The ill consequence of introducing it among
Asaph, St. (Bishop of) his preface to his Ser us at present

331
mons
384 A description of Hudibras's beard

331
Association of honest men proposed by Specta Bear-garden, the Spectator's method for the im-
126 provement of it

141
Assurance, what
373 A combat there

436
Atheism, an enemy to cheerfulness of mind 381 The cheats of it

. 449

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

.

5

[ocr errors]

No.

No.
Beaver, the haberdasher, a great politician 49 Burlesque humour

616
Beau's head, the dissection of one

• 275 Burnet (Dr.) some passages in his Theory of the
Beauties, when plagiaries

Earth considered

143, 146
The true secret how to improve beauty 33 Business (men of) their error in similitudes 421
Most charming when heightened by virtue 33 Of learning fittest for it

469
Whether male or female, very untractable 87 Bussy d'Amboise, a story of him

467
And fantastical

144 Butt: the adventures of a butt on the water 175
Impertinent and disagreeable
144 Butts described

47
The efficacy of beauty

144 The qualification of a butt
Beauty in a virtuous woman makes her more
virtuous

302 CACOETHES, or itch of writing, an epidemic-
Heightened by motion
406 al distemper

582
of objects, what understood by it
412 Cælia, her character

404
Nothing makes its way more directly to the Cæsar, (Julius) his behaviour to Catullus, who
soul

412
had put him into a lampoon

23
Every species of sensible creatures has dif His reproof to an ill reader

147
ferent notions of it
412 A frequent saying of his

256
A second kind of it

412 His commentaries, the new edition of it an
The force of it
510 honour to the English press

367
Beggars, Sir Andrew Freeport's opinion of them 232 His activity and perseverance

. 374
The grievance of them

430 Lost his life by neglecting a Roman augur's
Beings, the seale of, considered by the Spectator 519 caution

- 395
Bell, (Mr.) his ingenious device

28 Calamities, merit of suffering patiently under
Bell-savage, its etymology
28 them

312
Belvidera, a critique on a song upon her 470 Not to be distinguished from blessings 483
Belus, (Jupiter) temple of
415 Whimsical calamities

558
Beneficence, the
pleasure of it
588 Caligula, his wish

16
A discourse on it
• 601 Calisthenes, his character

422
Benevolence treated of
601 Calumny, the ill effects of it

451
Bicknell, (Mrs.) for what commended by Spec The great offence of calumny

594
tator

370 Rules against

it by the fathers of La Trappe 594
Bill proposed by a country gentleman to be Cambray, (the Bishop of) his education of a
brought into the House for the better pre daughter recommended

95
serving of the female game

326 Camilla, a true woman in one particular 15
Bills of mortality, the use of them

289 Her letter to the Spectator from Venice 443
Birds, a cage full for the opera

How applauded there

443
How affected by colours
412 Camillus, his deportment to his son

263
Bion, his saying of a greedy search after happi Campbell, (Mr.) the dumb fortune-teller, an ex-

574

traordinary person
Biters, their business

47 Candour, the consequence and benefit of it . 380
Biting, a kind of mongrel wit described and ex. Canidia, an antiquated beauty, described 312
ploded by the Spectator
504 Cant, from whence to be derived

147
Biton and clítobus, their story related, and ap Capacities of children not duly regarded in
plied by the Spectator
483 their education -

• 307
Blackmore, (Sir Richard) his observation 6 Caprice often acts in the place of reason 191
Blank, his letter to the Spectator about his fa Carbuncle, (Dr.) his dye, what

52
mily

563 Care: what ought to be a man's chief care 122
Blank verse proper for tragedy

39 Carneades, the philosopher, his definition of
Blanks of society, who
10 beauty

144
Blast, (Lady) her character

457 Cartesian, how he would account for the ideas
Bluemantle, (Lady) an account of her

427 formed by the fancy, from a single circum-
Board-wages, the ill effects of it
88 stance of the memory

417
Boccalini, his animadversions upon critics 291 Cases in love answered

614
His fable of a grasshopper applied to Spectator 355 Casimir Liszynski, an atheist in Poland, the man-
Bodily exercises of ancient encouragement 161 ner of his punishment

310
Body, (human) the work of a transcendantly Cassius, proof he gave of his temper in childhood 157
wise and powerful being.

543 Castilian, story of a Castilian husband and his
Bohours, (Monsieur) great crític among the

wife

198
French

62 Castle-builders, who, and their follies exposed 167
Boileau censured, and for what
209 Cat, a great contributor to harmony

361
Bonosus, the drunken Briton, a saying of him Cat-call, a dissertation upon that instrument 361
after he had hanged himself
569 Catiline, Tully's character of him

386
Books reduced to their quintessence

124 Cato, the respect paid him at the Roman theatre 446
The legacies of great geniuses

• 166 Grounds for his belief of the immortality of
Boots, Rimez, what
60 the soul

537
Breeding, fine breeding distinguished from good 66 An instance of his probity

557
Bribery, most prevailing way of making one's Cave of Trophonius, people put in it to be
394 mended

599
British ladies distinguished from the Picts • 41 Celibacy, the great evil of the nation

528
Brunetta and Phillis, their adventures 80 Censor of small wares, an officer to be appointed 16
Bruyere, (Mons.) his character of an absent man 77 Of marriages

308
Buck, (Timothy) his answer to James Miller's Censure, a tax, by whom paid the public, and
challenge
436 for what

- 101
Buffoonery censured

443 Censure and applause should not mislead us 610
Bullock and Norris, differently habited, prove Chamont's saying of Monimia's misfortunes 395
great helps to a silly play
44 Chancery-court, why erected

564
Burlesque authon the delight of ordinary read Chaplain, the character of Sir Roger de Cover.
· 616, 625 ley's

106

ness

474

[ocr errors]

court

ers

No.

No.
Charity, the great want of it among christians 516 An account of the ugly club

17
Charity-schools, great instances of a public spirit 294 The sighing club

30
Should be encouraged
430 The fringe-glove club

30
Charles I. a famous picture of that prince 58 The amorous club

30
Charles II. his gayeties

462 The hebdomadal club: some account of the
Charles the Great, his behaviour to his secreta-

members of that club

43
ry, who had debauched his daughter 181 Some account of the everlasting club

72
Charms, none can supply the place of virtue 395 The club of ugly faces

78
Chastity, the great point of honour in women 99 The difficulties met with in erecting that club 78
How chastity was prized by the heathens 579 The institution and use of clubs

474
Chastity of renown, what
480 Coach, (stage) its company

631
Cheerfulness of temper, how obtained and pre Coffee-house disputes

197.
served

143 Coffee-house debates seldom regular or me-
Wherein preferable to mirth
381 thodical

476
When worse than folly or madness
381 Coffee-house liars, two sorts of them

521
The many advantages of a cheerful temper 381 Colours, the eye takes most delight in them 412
Cherubims, what the rabbins say they are 600 Why-the poets borrow most epithets from
Chevy Chase, the Spectator's examen of it 70, 74 them -

412
Children, wrong measures taken in the educa Only ideas in the mind

- 413
tion of the British children
157 Speak all languages -

416
Children: the unnaturalness of mothers in mak Comedies, English, vicious

- 446
ing them suck a stranger's milk
246 Comfort, what, and where found

196
The duty of children to their parents 426 An attendant on patience

501
Ill education of children fatal

431 Commendation generally followed by detraction 348
A multitude of them one of the blessings of Commerce, the extent and advantage of it 69
the married state

500 Commercial friendship preferable to generosity 346
Children in the wood, a ballad, wherein to be Common-prayer, considerations on the reading
commended

85
of it

147
Chinese, the punishment among them for parri The excellency of it --

147
cide
189 Commonwealth of Amazons

438
Why the Chinese laugh at our gardens 414 Company, temper chiefly to be considered in
Chit-chat Club's letter to the Spectator
560 the choice of it

424
Chloe, the idiot

· 466 Comparisons in Homer and Milton defended by
Chremylus, his character out of Aristophanes 464 Monsieur Boileau against Monsieur Per-
Christian religion, the clear proof of its articles,

rault

303
and excellency of its doctrines 186, 213 Compassion, the exercise of it would tend to
Christianity, the only system that produces con-

lessen the calamities of life

169
tent
574 Civilizes human nature

. 397
How much above philosophy
634 How to touch it

391
Chocolate, a great heater of the blood in women 365 Complaisance, what kind of it peculiar to courts 394
Chronogram, a piece of false wit

60 Compliments in ordinary discourse censured 103
Church-musicians reproved for not keeping to Exchange of compliments

155
the text as well as the preachers

338 Concave and convex figures in architecture
Church-work, slow work, according to Sir Ro-

have the greatest air, and why

415
ger de Coverley

383 Conde, (Prince of) his face like that of an eagle 86
Church-yard, the country 'Change on Sunday 112 Confidence, the danger of it to the ladies 395
Cicero, a punster
61 Conquests, the vanity of them

180
Entertainment found in his philosophical writ Connecte, (Thomas) a monk in the 14th centu-
ings

61 ry, a zealous preacher against the women's
His genius
404 commodes in those days

98
The oracle's advice to him
404 Consciousness, when called affectation

38
What he says of scandal

427 Constancy in sufferings, the excellency of it 237
Of the Roman gladiators

436 Contemplation, the way to the mountain of the
His extraordinary superstition
505

514
And desire of glory

554 Content, how described by a Rosicrucian 574
Clarendon, (Earl of) his character of a person of The virtue of it

• 574
a troublesome curiosity,

439 Contentment, the utmost good we can hope for
A reflection of that historian
485 in this life

163
Clarinda, an idol, in what manner worshipped 73 Conversation most straitened in numerous as-
Clavius, proving incapable of any other studies,

semblies

68
became a celebrated mathematician 307 Usually stuffed with too many compliments 103
Cleanliness, the praise of it

631 What properly to be understood by the word
Cleanthe, her story
15 conversation

143
Cleanthes, his character

404
An improvement of taste in letters

. 409
Cleopatra, description of her sailing down the Coquette's heart dissected

281
Cydnos

400 Coquettes, the present numerous race to what
Clergy, a three-fold division of them
21 owing

66
Clergyman, one of the Spectator's club
2 Great coveys of them about this town

390
Clergymen, the vanity of some in wearing Cordeliers, their story of St. Francis, their
scarfs
609 founder

245
Club: the She Romp Club

217 Cornaro, (Lewis) a remarkable instance of the
Methods observed by that Club
217 benefit of temperance

195
The Mohock Club

324 Cot-queans described by a lady who has one for
The design of their institution
324 her husband

482
Club-law, a convincing argument
239 Cotillus, his great equanimity

143
Clubs, nocturnal assemblies so called

9 Coverley, (Sir Roger de) a member of the Spec-
Several names of clubs, and their originals 9, et seq. tator's club, his character

2
Rules to be observed in the two-penny club 91 His opinion of men of fine parts

6

.

muses

ano

« AnteriorContinuar »