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Letter from Rosalinda, with a desire to be ad | Letter from a young officer to his father .

mitted into the Ugly Club - - - 87 To the Spectator from a castle-builder .
From T. T. complaining of the idols in coffee. From —, concerning tyranny of school-mas-
houses :.... . .. .. . 87 ters - . .

. .
From Philo Britannicus on corruption of ser From T. S. a school-boy at Richmond - 168

vants : .. ... .. 88 From- , concerning impertinents .
From Sam. Hopewell . . . :

From Isaac Hedgeditch, a poacher

168
From Leonora, reminding the Spectator of To the Spectator, from with a complaint
the catalogue . .

against a Jezebel . . . .
From B. D. concerning real sorrow . . From — who had been nonplussed by a
From Annabella, recommending the bishop

butt - - - - -
of Cambray's Education of a Daughter

From Jack Modish, of Exeter, about fashions 175
From Tom Trusty, a servant, containing

From Nathaniel Henroost, a henpecked hus-
account of his lífe and services . . 96 band . . . . . . . 176
From the master of the fan exercise -

From Celinda, about jealousy - . 178
From — against the equestrian order of From Martha Housewife to her husband . 178
ladies

To the Spectator, from with an account
From Will Wimble to Sir Roger de Coverley,

of a whistling match at the Bath . .
with a jack . . . . . 108 From Philarithmus, displaying the vanity of
To the Spectator, from complaining of

Lewis XIV's conquests . . . ..
the new petticoat .

From who had married herself without
From a lawyer on the circuit, with an ac-

her father's consent . . . . 181
count of the progress of the fashions in the From Alice Threadneedle against wenching 182

country . . . . . . . 129 From — in the round-house -
From Will Honeycomb . . . . 131 From — concerning Nicholas Hart, the
From George Trusty, thanking the Spectator

annual sleeper . . .
for the great benefit he has received from From Charles Yellow against jilts . 187
his works . . . . . . 134 From a gentleman to a lady, to whom he had
From William Wiseacre, who desires his

formerly been a lover, and by whom he
daughter may learn the exercise of the fan 134 had been highly commended. .
From a professed liar . .

From a father to his son . . .
From Ralph Valet, the faithful servant of a To Spectator, from Rebecca Neuletop, a town
perverse master -

lady - -
From Patience
From Patience Giddy, next thing to a lady's

From Eve Afterday, who desires
woman

by the Spectator
From Lydia Novell, complaining of her lov From a bawdy-house inhabitant, complaining

er's conduct : : - - - 140 of their visitors - -
From R. D. concerning the corrupt taste of From George Gosling about a ticket in the

the age, and the reasons of it . - 140 lottery . . . . . . 191
From Betty Santer about a wager - 140 A letter of consolation to a young gentleman
From Parthenope, who is angry with the

who has lately lost his father
Spectator for meddling with the ladies' To the Spectator from a husband complaining

petticoats . . . . . 140 of a heedless wife . .
From — upon drinking . . . 140 From complaining of a fantastical friend 194
From Rachel Basto, concerning female game From J. B. with advice to the Spectator

From Biddy Loveless, who is enamoured
From Parthenia .'.'.'.'..

with two young gentlemen at once .
From — , containing a reflection on a co-

From Statira to Spectator, with one to Oroon-
medy called the ‘Lancashire Witches'

dates - - - - - - -
From Andromache, complaining of the false From Susan Civil, servant to another lady,
notion of gallantry in love, with some let-

desiring Spectator's remarks upon volun-
ters from her husband to her . - 142 tary counsellors . . . . .
From — concerning wagerers . . 145 From Tho. Smoky, servant to a passionate
From complaining of impertinents in

master-
coffee-houses . . . . .

From a bastard, complaining of his condition
From complaining of an old bachelor

as such
From concerning the skirts of men's From Belinda to the Sothades . .

coats - - - - - . . 145 From J. D. to his coquette mstress . .
From — on the reading of the Common

From a lady to a gentleman confessing her
Prayer • • • • • • . 147 love . . . . - - - 204
From the Spectator to a dancing outlaw

From angry Phillis to her lover . . 204
From the same to a dumb visitant . . 148 From a lady to her husband, an officer in Spain
To the Spectator, from Sylvia, a widow, de To the Spectator, from Belinda, complaining

siring his service in the choice of a husband 149 of a female seducer . . . 25
The Spectator's answer . - . 149 From a country clergyman, against an affect-
To the Spectator from Simon Honeycomb, an

ed singing of the Psalms in Church - 205
account of his modesty, impudence, and From Robin Goodfellok, containing the cor-
marriage . . . . . . 154 rection of an errata in Sir William Tem-
From an Idol that keeps a coffee-house - 155 ple's rule for drinking .. . - 205
From a milliner, complaining of her customers 155 From Mary Meanwell, about visiting - 208
From , with a reproof to the Spectator

From a shopkeeper, with thanks to the Spec-
From — concerning the lady's visitants

tator - - - - - - - 208
From - complaining of the behaviour of From a lover, with a hue-and-cry after his
persons in church . . . . .

mistress's heart
From a woman's man ..

From J. D. concerning the immortality of the
From with a description of a country
wake . . . . . . . 161 From Melissa, who has a drone to her hus-

From M
From Leonora, who had just lost her lover 163) band

191

194

213

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No. 1
Letter from Barnaby Britt.e, whose wife is a filly 211 Letter from a mother to her undutiful son 263

From Josiah Henpeck, married to a Grimalkin 211 The son's answer . . . . . 263
From Martha Tempest, complaining of her To the Spectator, from Richard Estcourt, with

witty husband . . . . . 211 one enclosed from Sir Roger de Coverley 264
From Anthony Freeman, the henpecked 212 From James Easy, who had his nose abused
From Tom Megget, giving the Spectator an

in the pit • • - - - - 268
account of the success of Mr. Freeman's From A. B. on the mercenary views of per-
lecture - - - - - -

sons when they marry
en my marry.

.


.

268
From Kitty Termagant, giving an account of From Anthony Gape, who had the misfortune
the Romp's Club .

to run his nose against a post, while he was
From- complaining of his indelicate mis-

staring at a beauty • . - - 268
tress . . - - - .

From about the new-fashioned hoods 268
From Susannah Frost, an old maid . . 217 From one at Oxford, in love with Patetia . 268
From A. B. a parson's wife . . . 217 From Tom Trippet, on a Greek quotation in
From Ilenrietia to her ungracious lover . 220 a former Spectator • • .. 271
To the Spectator, from — , on false wit 220 From C. D. on Sir Roger's return to town 271
From T. D. concerning salutation - - From S. T. who has a show in a box, of a man,
From —, inquiring the reason why men of

a woman, and a horse .
parts are not the best managers . . From Cleanthes, complaining of Mrs. Jane,
From Esculapius about the lover's leap . 227 an old maid and a pickthank .
From Athenais, ànd Davyth ap Shenkin, on From with an enclosed letter from a
the same subject - -

bawd to a noble lord - .

274
From W. B. the projector of the pitch-pipe

From Frank Courtly, reproving the Spectator
From - on education

for some freedoms he had taken
From — on the awe which attends some From Celia, incensed at a gentleman who

speakers in public assemblies . . 231 had named the words · lusty fellow' in her
From Philonous, on free-thinkers . .

presence . . . . . . 276
From —, on marriage, and the husband's From Pucella, kept by an old bachelor 276

conduct to his wife . . . . 236 From Hezekiah Broadbrim, accusing the
From Tristissa, who is married to a fool 236 Spectator for not keeping his word . 276
From T. S. complaining of some people's be From Terraminta, on the arrival of a Made-
haviour in divine service . -

moiselle, completely dressed, from Paris
From — , with a letter translated from Aris From Betty Cross-stich, owner of Mademoi.
tænetus . . . . . .

selle . . . . . . . . 277
From a citizen in praise of his benefactor - 240 From a shopkeeper, whose wife is too learned
From Rustic Sprightly, a country gentleman,

for him .:
complaining of a fashion introduced in the From Florinda, who writes for Spectator's ad-

country by a courtier newly arrived. 240 vice in the choice of a husband after she
From Charles Easy, reflecting on the beha-

is married · ·

· · · 278
viour of a sort of beau at Philaster - 240 From Clayton, &c. on the same subject as
From Asteria on the absence of lovers - 241 their former letter - - - - 278
From Rebecca Ridinghood, complaining of an From Jenny Simper complaining of the parish
ill-bred fellow-traveller . :

clerk who has overdecked the church with
From on a poor weaver in Spitalfields 242 greens . . . . . . . 282
From Abraham Thrifty, guardian to two From the clerk in his own justification . 284
learned nieces . . . . .

From- , concerning false delicacy - 286
From - on Raphael's cartoons - - 244 From Philobrune, of Cambridge, inquiring
From Constantia field, on the ninth species

which is most beautiful, a fair or a brown
of women, called Apes -

244

complexion . . . . . 286
From Timothy Doodle, a lover of blind-man's. From Melvina, on male jilts - - - 288
buff . . . .

- 245 From Peter Motteux, an author turned dealer 288
From J. B. on the several ways of consolation From George Powell, who plays the part of
made use of by absent lovers

Orestes in a new tragedy, the Distressed
From Troillus, a declared enemy to the Greeks 245 Mother . . . . . . 290
From - , on the nursing of children - 246 From Sophia to know if the gentleman she
From T. B. being a dissertation on the eye 250 saw in the Park with a short face was the
From Abraham Spy, on a new invention of

Spectator . . . . . . 290
perspective glasses for the use of starers 250 The Spectator's answer
From Mary Heartfree, describing the power To the Spectator, from Jezebel, a woman

ful effects of the eye . . . . 252 poor and prond . . . . .
From Barbara Crabtree, to know if she may From Josiah Fribbel, on pin-money ·

not make use of a cudgel on her sot of a From J. M. advising the Spectator to prefix
husband - - - - -

_ no more Greek mottos to his papers .
From a lawyer whose wife is a great orator

From Aurelia Careless, concerning the use
From Lydia to Harriet, a lady newly married 254 of the window in a beautiful lady . 296
Harriet's answer . . . . . 254 From Euphues, desiring the Spectator's advice 296
To the Spectator, from a gentleman in love From Susannah Lovebane, against lampooners

ers 296
with a beauty without fortune . . 254

From Charity Frost

296

. .
From Ralph Crotchet, for a theatre of ease to From John Trot - • •

. .
. .

.

296

296
be erected • • • • • •

From Chastity Loveworth, on the general no

220
From Mr. Clayton, &c. . . . . 258 tion men have of the other sex - ..
From Jack Afterday, an old bachelor, grown From Sir J. Enville, married to a woman of
dead to all pleasures but that of being

quality . . . . . . .
worth 50,0001. . .

From Susannah Loveworth, on the behaviour
From a lover, with an enclosed letter to his

of married people before company - 300
humoursome mistress . - . 260 From Philanthropos, on the terms of conver-
From a father, discoursing on the relative du.

sation with the fair sex · · · · 300
ties betwixt parents and their children 2631 From Miranda, on valetudinary friendship 300

242

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316

Letter from 'D. G. thanking the Spectator for Letter from three country virtuous virgins, who
his criticism on Milton - - -

* 300 are ambitious of the character of very good
To Chloe, from her lover, giving her an ac-

wives . . . . . . 332
count of his dreams

From the author of a history of dancing · 334
From Clitander, a silent lover . . . 304 From a young man, complaining of an ill cus-
From Parthenissa, whose face is damaged by

tom he has observed among old men . 336
the small pox -

From Rebecca, the distressed, complaining of
From Corinna to Amilcar, on the same occasion

a club of female rakes · ·
Amilcar's answer -

From some further thoughts on educa-
From — on the education of children .

tion_ :. .. :. : : 337, 353
From Mules Palfrey, with a project for the From Physibulus, occasioned by the Epilogue
better regulation of matches . . .

to the · Distressed Mother
From a tradesman married to a woman of From Philomeides, answer to the foregoing
quality .

letter . . . ..
From Reader Gentle, on a new paper called From an officer, concerning Sylvana's con-
The Historian' . .

duct in the absence of her husband - 342
From Elizabeth Sweepstakes

From Jack Freelove to his mistress, written
John Trot, the dancer . . . 308 in the person of a monkey . . . 343
From Biddy Dough-bake, who, having been To the Spectator, from Epicure Mammon, a

bid to love, cannot unlove . . . 310 great trencherman - - - - 344
From Dick Lovesick, in love with a lady From complaining of an extravagant
whose fortune will not pay off his debts by

custom among some women of taking snuff 344
5001. . . . . . 310 From Taw Waw Eben Zan Kalader, Empe-
From a discarded lover, with a letter to him

ror of the Mohocks, with a manifesto . 347
from his mistress, and his answer . 310 From Mary, against detraction . . 343
From Philanthropos, on a tale-bearer

- 310

From Hotspur, with the description of a de-
From Tim Watchwell, on fortune-stealers

votee . . . . . . .
From J. O. on the expression used by several From Sophrosunius, complaining of the impo-
_ of the clergy in their prayers before sermon

dent behaviour of people in the streets 354
From further thoughts on education

From — in behalf of a genteel dress • 360
From Bob Harmless, complaining of his mig. From John Shallow, who had lately been at
tress . . . . . . .

a concert of cat calls . .'
From John Trot, desiring the Spectator's ad From Tom Pottle, in commendation of Brooke
vice - - - -

314 and Hellier . . . . . . 362
From Toby Rentfree, with

int

From Will Cymon, with an account of the
against Signior Nicolini . . . 314 improvements wrought in him by love and
From M. W. on the education of young gen-

the character of his mistress . . 362
tle-women . · · . 314 From Philip Honeywood, upon travel - 364
From Samuel Slack on idleness .

From Robin Bridegroom, in Birchin-lane, com-
From Clitander to Cleone . . . 316 plaining of a set of drums that awakened
To the Spectator, with an account of the

him with their thunder the morning afier
amours of Escalus an old beau . .

he was married · · · · · 364
From Dorinda, complaining of the Spectator's From Altamira, a prude . . .

partiality . . . . . ., From with the translation of a Lap
From Will Sprightly, a man of fashions • 319 land song . . . . . .'
From - complaining of a female court, From Constantia Comb-brush, complaining

called The Inquisition on Maids and Bache that her mistress gives her cast off clothes
lors ... . . . . .

to others - . . . . .
The power and management of this inqui From Paul Regnaud to his friend on the
sition - - - .

. -

death of Madame de Villacerfe ..
From N. B. a member of the Lazy Club

To Spectator, from — on whims and hu-
To the Spectator, from Octavia, married to

mourists - . . . .
an ungrateful husband - -

322 From Ralph Belfry, in commendation of
From Clarinda, with her journal . 323 Powell, master of the motion
From Philanthropos, account of the Mohock From Humphrey Transfer, on a Moving Club

Club . . . . . . . 324 of parish clerks · · · · · 372
From a countryman to her he very much re From H. R. complaining of the Lawyer's Club

spects, Mrs. Margaret Clark . - 324 From Michael Gander, on the day watchman
From R. T. to Spectator, upon a passage in

and his goose .. . .. . .
Milton . . . . . . . 325 From Rachel Watchful on dancing : . . 376
From a country gentleman, under the misfor. From Myrtilla, desiring the Spectator's advice
tune of having a fine park and an only

in relation to her lover . . . ..
daughter . .

. . - 326 From J. S. animadverting on some persons
From Mrs. Mary Comfit, at Mile end Green 326 behaviour at church
From T. B. complaining of his wife's expen From T. S. on vanity, and the abundance of
sive longings during her pregnancy : 326 it in the female sex : :.

350
From a married gentleman, who is in a fair From Betty Lemon, who had been presented
way of being undone by his virtuous, love-

with a guinea by a Jew . . .
ly wife . . . . . . 328 From the sexton of St. Bride's, on a new
From S. P. recommending the patronage of

charity-school of fifty girls, erected in that
young modest men to such as are able to

parish - •

.

380
countenance and introduce them into the From a gentleman in Denmark . . 393

world . . . . . . 330 To the Spectator, from Peter de Quir, of St.
From James Discipulus, complaining of the

John's college, in Cambridge : · 396
nearness of his father as a great discour. From Queen Anne Boleyn to Henry VIII. 397

agement to him in the course of his studies 330 From Cynthio to Flavia, and their answers,
From Jack Lightfoot, an account of his sweat-

on their breaking off their amour - 398
· · · 3321 From a bankrupt to his friend, and the answer 456

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Letter from a penitent jilt

401 Letter from T. B. complaining of the behaviour
From a lady importuned by her mother to be

of some fathers towards their eldest sons 496
unfaithful to her husband - - -

From Rachel Shoestring, Sarah Trice, an
From a married man, who, out of jealousy,

humble servant unknown, and Alice Blue-
obstructed the marriage of a lady to whom

garter, in answer to that of Matilda Mohair,
he was guardian - -

• 402 who is with child and has crooked legs 496
From a lady, whose lover would have abused From Moses Greenbag, the lawyer, giving an

her passion for him . . • 402 account of some new brothers of the whip,
From a young uncle, on the disobedience of

who have chambers in the Temple - 498
his elder nephews and nieces

• 402

From Will Honeycomb, with his dream, in-
About a city and a country life . . 406 tended for a Spectator . - . 499
With the translation of a Lapland ode 406 From Philogamus, in commendation of the
On the passions - . .'

408 married state . . .
Concerning Gloriana

From Ralph Wonder, complaining of the be
Of good humour - .

424 haviour of an unknown lady at the parish
Of the country infirmary

church near the bridge · - . 503
Of common beggars ..

From Titus Trophonius, an interpreter of
Of charity schools . .

drcams • • • • • • 505
The freedoms of married men and women 430 From , complaining of the oppression and
From Richard and Sabina Rentfree. • 431 injustice observed in the rules of all clubs
About prejudice and emulation -

and meetings . . . .

508
Naked shoulders

- - -

From Hezekiah Thrift, a discourse on trade 509
A country society and infirmary

437 From Will Honeycomb, occasioned by two
From Camilla • • • •

443 stories he had met with relating to a sale
From an Exchange man ·

of women in Persia and China - - 511
About buffoonery

. 443 From the Spectator's clergyman, being a
From Ephraim Weed . .

. 450 thought on sickness .". . 513
From a projector for news · 452, 457 From with a vision of Parnassus 514
About education - - -

From with two enclosed, one from a
From one who had married a scold .. 455 celebrated town coquette to her friend
From Pill Garlick -

455 newly married in the country, and her
About the use and abuse of similes

friend's answer . . . . . 515
Salutations at churches

From Ed. Biscuit, Sir Roger de Coverley's
With a translation of the 114th Psalm . 461 butler, with an account of his master's death 517
About the advance on the paper for the stamps 461 From —_-, condoling with him on Sir Roger's
About King Charles the Second's gayeties' 462 death, with some remarkable epitaphs. 518
About dancing - -

. 466 From Tom Tweer, on physiognomy, &c. 518
From Lazarus Hopeful to Basil Plenty 472 From F. G. a widower, with some thoughts
About sight : .

472 on a man's behaviour in that condition 520
About panegyrical satires upon ourselves 473 From — a great enemy to public report 521
From Timothy Stanza - - - - 473 From T. W.a man of prudence, to his mistress 522
From Bob Short . . . . . 473 To Spectator, from B. T. a sincere lover, to
To the Spectator, from J. R. complaining of

the same . -

.

522
his neighbours, and the turn of their con From--, dated from Glasgow in Scotland,

versation, in the country - - . 474 | with a vision . . . . . 524
From Dulcibella Thankley, who wants a di. From Pliny, to his wife's aunt, Hispulla . 525

rection to Mr. Campbell, the dumb fortune From Moses Greenbag, to the Speciator, with
teller :.: .:. : :. 474

a further account of some gentleman-bro-
From D. B. desiring the Spectator's advice in

thers of the whip . . .

526
a weighty affair

From Philagnotes, giving an account of the
From = containing a description of his ill effects of a visit paid to a female married
garden . . . . . . 477

relation - - - - . . . 527
From A. B. with a dissertation on fashions, From —, who had made his mistress a pre-

and a proposal for a building for the use of sent of a fan, with a copy of verses on that
them

- - - - . . 478 occasion . . . . . . 527
From Monsieur Chezluy to Pharamond · 480 From Rachel Welladay, a virgin of twenty-
To the Spectator, from a clerk to a lawyer 480 thrce, with a heavy complaint against the
From being a lady married to a cotquean 482 men - - - - - . . 528
From — with a dissertation on modesty 484 From Will Honeycomb, lately married to a
From — , containing reflections on the pow.

country girl, with no portion, but a great
erful effects of trifles and trifling persons 485 deal of virtue . . . . . 530
From a handsome black man up two pair of From Mr. Pope, on the verses spoken by the
stairs, in the Paper-buildings in the Temple,

Emperor Adrian upon his death-bed . 532
who rivals a handsome fair man, up one From Dustererastus, whose parents will not

pair of stairs, in the same buildings . 485 let him choose a wise for himself . . 533
From Robin Shorter, with a postscript = 485 From Penance Cruel, complaining of the be-
From — with an account of the unmarried

haviour of persons who travelled with her
henpecked, and a vindication of the married 486 in a stage coach out of Essex to London 533
From - with an epigram on the Spectator, From Charlotte Wealthy, setting forth the

by Mr. Tate . . . . . 488 hard case of such women as are beauties
From- , with some reflections on the ocean,

and fortunes - - - - - - 534
considered both in a calm and in a storm, From Abraham Dapperwit, with the Specta-

and a divine ode on that occasion - - 489 tor's answer . . . . . . 534
From Matilda Mohair, at Tunbridge, com-

From Jeremy Comfit, a grocer, who is in hopes
plaining of the disregard she meets with, on

of growing rich by losing his customers
account of her strict virtue, from the men, From Lucinda Parley, a coflee-house idol 534
who take more notice of the romps and co From C. B. recommending knoiling as a pro-
quettes than the rigids . . .

• 492/

per amusement to the beaux . . 536
VOL. II.,

From Ramothy Stanstires upon ein

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No.
Letter from a shoeing horn . . 536 Letter from one who recommended himself for
From Relicta Lovely, a widow
. 539 a newsmonger • • • •

625
From Eustace, in love with a lady of eigh-

About the force of no

626
teen, whose parents think her too young to About a crossed lover . . . 697
marry by three years . . . . 539 About eternity to come. •
From - complaining of a young divine,

About church music :.

630
who murdered Archbishop Tillotson's ser About the Rattling Club's getting into church 630
mon upon evil speaking . . . . 539 Letter dropper of antiquity, who . . 59
From , with a short critique on Spenser 540 Levees of great men animadverted upon . 193
From Philo-Spec, who apprehends a dissolu. Levity of women, the efi

. 212
tion of Spectator's club, and the ill conse | Lewis of France compared with the Czar of Mus.

quences of it . . . . . 542 covy . . . .
From Captain Sentry, lately come to the pos Libels, a severe law against them . . 451

session of Sir Roger de Coverley's estate 544 Those that write or read them excommuni-
From the Emperor of China to the Pope • 545 cated . . . .

. 451
From W. C. to the Spectator, in commenda Liberality, wherein the decency of it consists

292
tion of a generous benefactor · · 546. The true basis of it . . . 346
From Charles Easy, setting forth the sove. Liberty of the people, when best preserved - 287

reign use of the Spectators in several re Library; a lady's library described ..
markable instances . . . . 547 | Liddy, (Miss) the difference between her tem-
From - on poetical justice . . . 548 per and that of her sister Martha, and the
From Sir Andrew Freeport, retiring from T. reasons of it ..: : · · · 395
business . .. .

549 Lie given, a great violation of the point of ho
From Philonicus, a litigious gentleman, com-

nour . . . . . . .
plaining of some unpolite law terms.

Several sorts of lies . . ."..
From T. F. G. S. J. T. E. T. in commenda Life; the duration of it uncertain . .

tion of the Spectator · · · · 553 In what manner spent according to Seneca
From the Bantum ambassador to his master, Not real but when cheerful . . .

about the English · · · 557 In what manner to be regulated - -
From the dumb conjuror to the Spectator 560 Life how to have a right enjoyment of it . . 143
From the Chit-chat Club .

560 A survey of it in a vision · ·
From Oxford, about recovering his speech 560 To whai compared in the Scriptures, and by
From Frank Townly

the heathen philosophers ·
About the Widow's Club . . . .

The present life a state of probation .
From Blank, about his family . . 563 We are in this life nothing more than passen-
About an angry husband . . . . 563 gers :

: : .
From Will Warley, about military education 566 Illustrated by the story of a travelling der
From an half pay officer, about a widow • 566 vise . . . . . . .
From Peter Push, on the same subject. 566 The three important articles of life .
Against quacks:

min343

Eternal life we ought to be most solicitous
From the president of the Widow's Club

about . . . . . . .

575
From a man supposed mad for reading poetry Man's not worth his care....

575
aloud

Valuable only as it prepares for another
A second letter about the ubiquity of the God Light and colours only ideas of the mind .. 413
head · · · · · · ·

580 Lillie, (Charles) his presents to the Spectator
Several answered at once . . • 581 Lindamira, the only woman allowed to paint 41
From Constantio Spec · · · 581 Lion in the Haymarket occasioned man
From Amanda L

jectures in the town . . . . 13
From Shalum, the Chinese, to the princess Very gentle to the Spectator . .

Hilpa, before the flood · · · · 584 Livy, in what he excels all other historians 409, 490
From Hilpa to Shalum . - • : 585 Logic of kings, what . . .
From John Shadow, at Oxford, about reflect Loller, (Lady Lydia) her memorial from the

ing at night on past day's actions . 586 country infirmary . . .
About a vision of hearts . . . . 587 | London, an emporium for the whole earth .
About plaintiff . . . . . 589 | The differences of the manners and politics
From John Shadow, about dreams . . 593 of one part from the other . . . 403
Of inconsistent metaphors . . . 595 London, (Mr.) gardener, an heroic poet .
From Jeremy Lovemore, an account of his life 596 Longings in women, the extravagances of
About making love • . . .

602 them ... :

.
From Fanny Fickle

.
. . . .

Longinus, an observation of that critic . .
From an aunt, about her niece's idleness 606 Lottery, some discourse on it .
About the vanity of clergymen wearing scarfs 609 Love, the general concern of it . .
From Tom Nimble, about antipathies . 609 Our hearts misled by a love of the world
From Cleora, against the ladies' work . 609 A passion never well cured - - -
From Lesbia, a deluded lady · · 611 Natural love in brutes more intense than
About genealogy · · · · · 612 reasonable creatures . . . .
From Will Hopeless, about ambition . 613

The gallantry of it on a very ill foot .
From the Temple, about beggars' eloquence 613 Love has nothing to do with state - .
From Monimia, to recover a lost love . 613 The transport of a virtuous lover
From a country wit, in the burlesque way 616 In what manner discovered to his mistress
From a pedant, in his pedantic way, on the

one of Will Honeycomb's acquaintance
same subject. . . . . 617 Love, the mother of poetry · · ·
About the styles of letters .

618 The capriciousness of love - - . . 475
Answers to several . . . . . 619 The romantic style in which it is made.
About flattery

621 A nice and fickle passion . . . .
From the love casuist, about the widowa' te Method to preserve it alive after marriage 506

nure and the black ram . . . 623 Love casuist, some instructions of his . 591, 607
From the samo about love queries . . 625 | Lover, an account of the life of one . . 595

575

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