Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

123

fair sex

No.

No.
Englishman, the peculiar blessing of being born 135 Euphrates river contained in one pasin 415
Spectator's speculations upon the English Exchange, (Royal) described

454
tongue

135 Exercise, the great benefit and necessity of bo-
Englishmen not naturally talkative 135, 148

dily exercise

116
The English tongue much adulterated 165 The most effectual physic

191
Enmity, the good fruits of it

399 Expenses, oftener proportioned to our expecta-
Enthusiasm, the misery of it.
201 tions than possessions

191
Envy, the ill state of an envious man
19 Eyes, a dissertation on them

250
His relief

19 The prevailing influence of the eye instanced
The way to obtain his favour
19 in several particulars

252
Abhorrence of envy a certain note of a great
mind
253 FABLE of the lion and the man

11
Epaminondas, his honourable death

133 Of the children and the frogs
Ephesian matron, the story of her
11 Of Jupiter and the countryman

25
Ephraim, the Quaker, the Spectator's fellow The antiquity of fables

183
traveller in a stage coach
132 Fable of Pleasure and Pain

183
His reproof to a recruiting officer in the same Of a drop of water

293
coach

132 The great usefulness and antiquity of fables 512
And advice to him at their parting

132 Face, a good one, a letter of recommendation 221
Epictetus, his observation upon the female sex 53 Faces, every man should be pleased with his own 559
His allusion to human life

219 Fadlallah, his story out of the Persian tales 578
His rule for a person's behaviour under de- Fairs for buying and selling nen cus
traction

355
among the Persians

511
His saying of sorrow
397 Fairy writing

419
His advice to dreamers

524 The pleasures of imagination that arise from it 419
Epigram on Hecatissa

52 More difficult than any other, and why 419
Epistles recommendatory, the injustice and ab- The English are the best posts of this sort 410
surdity of most of them
493 Faith, the benefit of it

459
Epistolary poetry, the two kinds of styles 618 The means of confirming it

465
Epitaph on a charitable man
177 Falsehood, the goddess of

63
On the countess dowager of Pembroke 323 Falsehood in man a recommendation to the
Epitaphs, extravagance of some, and modesty of

156
others

26 Falsehood and dissiinulation, the inconvenience
An epitaph written by Ben Jonson
33 of it perpetual

352
Equanimity, without it we have no true taste False wit, the region of it

25
of life
143 Falstaff, (Sir John) a famous butt

47
Equestrian order of ladies
104 Fame generally coveted

73
Its origin
104 Divided into three different species

218
Equestrian ladies, who ,

435

Dificulty of obtaining and preserving fame 255
Equipages, the splendour of them in France 15 The inconveniences attending the desire of it 255
A great temptation to the female sex
15 A follower of merit

426
Erasmus insulied by a parcel of Trojans
239 The palace of Fame described

439
Erratum, a sad one committed in printing the

Courts compared to it

439
Bible
379 Familiarities indecent in society

429
Error, his habitation described

460 Families: the ill measures taken by great fami-
How like to truth

460 lies in the education of their younger sons 108
Errors and prepossessions difficut to be avoided 117 Family madness in pedigrees

612
Essay on the pleasures of the imagination, from Fan, the exercise of it

102
411 to

421 Fancy, all its images enter by the sight 411
Essays, wherein differing from methodical dis- The daughter of Liberty

514
476 The character of Fancy

558
Estates generally purchased by the slower parts Her calamities

558
of mankind
222 Fashion, the force of it

64
Estcourt, the comedian his extraordinary talents 358 Men of fashion, who

151
Eternity, a prospect of it

155 A society proposed to be erected for the in-
An essay upon eternity
590 spection of fashion

175
Eternity: part is to come
628 A description of fashion

460
Speech in Catoon eternity, translated into Latin 628 Fashions, the vanity of them wherein beneficial 478
Ether, (fields of) the pleasure of surveying them 420 A repository proposed to be built for them 478
Etherege (Sir George) author of a comedy call- The balance of fashion leads on the side of
ed she would if she could,' reproved 51 France

478
Evergreens of the fair sex

395 The evil influence of fashion on the married
Evremond, (St.) his endeavours to palliate the

state

490
Roman superstitions

213 Fashionable society, (a board of directors of
The singularity of his remarks

349 the) proposed, with the requisite qualifica-
Ebulus, his character
49 tions of the members

478
Eucrate, the favourite of Pharamond

76 Father, the affection of one for a daughter 449
His conference with Pharamond
84 Favours, of ladies, not to be boasted of

611
Eucretia, her character
144 Faults, (secret,) how to find them out

399
Eudosia, her behaviour

79 Faustina, the empress, her notions of a pretty
Her character
144 gentleman

128
Euxodus and Leontine, their friendship and Fear, how necessary it is to subdue it

615
education of their children
123 Passion of fear treated

471
Eugene, (Prince) the Spectator's account of him 340 Fear of death often mortal

25
In what manner to be compared with Alex- Feasts, the gluttony of modern ones

195
ander and Cæsar
340 Feeling not so perfect a sense as sight

411
Eugenius appropriates a tenth part of his in- Fellow of a college, a wise saying of one about
come to charitable uses
177 posterity

589
Vol. II,

56

courses

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

No.

No
Female literature in want of regulation 242 | GALLANTRY: wherein true gallantry consists 7
Female oratory, the excellency of it
241 Gaming, the folly of it

93
Rakes described

336 Gaper, the sign of the gaper frequent in Am-
Virtues, which the most shining

81 sterdam
Fiction, the advantage the writers have in it to Garden, the innocent delights of one
please the imagination

419 Part of Kensington Garden to be most admired 477
What other writers please in it

420 In what gardening may be compared to poelry 477
Fidelia, her duty to her father
449 Gardening, errors in it

414
Fidelio, his adventures, and transformation into Why the English gardens are not so entertain.
a looking-glass

392 ing to the fancy as those in France and
Final causes of delight in objects
413 Italy

414
Lie bare and open

413 Observations concerning improvement both
Fine gentlemen, a character frequently misap-

for benefit and beauty

414
plied by the fair sex
75 Applied to education

455
Flattery described
460 Genealogy, a letter about

612
How grateful

621 Generosity, not always to be commended 316
Flavia, her mother's rival
91 Genius, what properly a great one

160
Her character and amour with Cynthio 398 Gentry of England, generally speaking, in debt
Flavilla, liberal of her snuff at church 344 Geography of a jest settled

133
Spoiled by a marriage

437 Georgics, (Virgil's) the beauty of their subjects 417
Flora, an atiendant on the spring
425 Germanicus, his taste of true glory

239
Flutter, Sir Fopling,'a comedy; remarks upon it 65 Gesture, good in oratory

407
Flutter of the fan, the variety of motions in it 102 Ghosts warned out of the playhouse

36
Foible, ( Sir Jeoffry) a kind keeper

190 The appearance of a ghost of great efficacy in
Follies and defects mistaken by us in ourselves

an English theatre
for worth

460 What ghosis say should be a little discoloured 412
Fontenelle, his saying of the ambitious and co- The description of them pleasing to the fancy 419
vetous
576 Why we incline to believe them

419
Fools

, great plenty of them the first day of April 47 Not a village in England formerly without one 419
Naturally mischievous
485 Shakspeare's the best

419
Fop, what sort of persons deserve that character 280 Gifts of fortune more valued than they ought
Forehead esteemed an organ of speech
231 to be

294
Fortius, his character
422 Gigglers in church reproved

158
Fortunatus, the trader, his character

443 Gipsies: an adventure between Sir Roger, the
Fortune, often unjustly complained of
282 Spectator, and some gipsies

130
To be controled by nothing but infinna wis. Giving and forgiving, two different things 189
dom

293 Gladiators of Rome, what Cicero says of them 436
Fortune-stealers, who they are that set up for Gladio's dream

197
such

311 Gladness of heart to be moderated and restrain-
Distinguished from fortune-hunters
31 ed, but not banished by virtue

494
Frankair, (Charles) a powerful and successful Claphyea, her story out of Josephus

110
speaker

484 Glorianą, the design upon her
Freart, (Monsieur) what he says of the manner Glory, the love of it

139
of both ancients and moderns in architec- In what the perfection of it consists

139
415
How to be preserved

172, 218
Freeport, (Sir Andrew) a member of the Spec- Goat's milk, the affect it had upon a man bred
tator's Club
2 with it

408
His moderation in point of politics 126 God, the being of one the greatest of certainties 381
His defence of merchants

174 An instance of his exuberant goodness and
Divides his time between business and plea-

mercy

519
232 A being of infinite perfections

513
His opinion of beggars

232 Contemplation of his omnipresence and om-
His resolution to retire from business
549 niscience

565
Freethinkers put into Trophonius's cave 599 He cannot be absent from 18

565
French much addicted to grimace
481 Considerations on his ubiquier

571
Their levity

435 | Good-breeding, the great revolution that has
French poets, wherein to be imitated by the

happened in that article

119
English
45 Good-humour, the necessity of it

100
Fribblers, who

288 Good-nature, more agreeable in conversation
Friends kind to our faults
399 than wit

169
Friendship, the great benefit of it
68 The necessity of it

169
The medicine of life
68 Born with us

169
The qualifications of a good friend

68 A moral virtue
An essay upon friendship
385 An endless source of pleasure

196
Defined

385 Good-nature and cheerfulness the two great or.
What sort of friend the most useful
385 naments of virtue

243
A necessary ingredient in the married state 490 Good sense and good-nature always go together 437
Preferred by Spenser to love and natural af- Goosequill, (William) clerk to the lawyer's club 372
fection
490 Gospel gossips described

46
Fritilla's dream

597 Goths, in poetry, who
Frolic, what ought truly to be termed so 358 Government, what form of it the most reason-
Frugality, the support of generosity
107 able

287
The true basis of liberality
346 Grace at meals practised by the Pagans

458
Funnel, (Wil) the toper, his character 569 Gracefulness of action, the excellency of it
Futurity, the strong inclination a man has to Grammar-schools, a common fault observed in
know it.
604 them

353
A weakness

604 Grandeur and minuteness, the extremes pleas-
The misery of knowing it

604

wig to the fancy

ture

sure

[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors]

trees

No

No
Grandmotner, Sir Roger de Coverley's great, Her letter to Shalum

585
great, great grandmother's receipt for a Historian, in conversation who

136
hasty-pudding and a white-pot

109 The most agreeable talent of an historian 420
Gratitude, the most pleasing exercise of the How history pleases the imagination

420
mind

453 Descriptions of battles in it seldom understood 428
A divine poem upon it

453 History, secret, an odd way of writing one 619
Great men, the tax paid by them to the public 101 Hobbes, (Mr.) his observations on laughter 47
Not truly known till some years after their His notions de base human nature

588
death

101 Hobson, (Tobias) the Cambridge carrier, the
Greatness of objects, what understood by it, in

first man in England who let out hackney-
the pleasures of the imagination

412, 413
horses

509
Greeks, a custom practised by them

189 His justice in his employment, and the suc-
Greeks and Romans, the different methods ob-

cess of it

509
served by them in the education of their Hockley in the Hole Gladiators

436
children

313 Homer: his excellence in the multitude and
Greeks and Trojans, who so called
239 variety of his characters

273
Green, why called in poetry the cheerful colour 387 He degenerates sometimes into burlesque 279
Green-sickness, Sabina Rentfree's letter about it 431 His descriptions charm more than Aristotle's
Grinning : a grinning prize
173 reasoning

411
Grotto, verses on one
632 Compared with Virgil

417
Guardian of the fair-sex, the Spectator so 449 When he is in his province

417
Gyges, and Aglaus, their story
610 Honestus, the trader, his character

443
Gymnosophists, (Indian) the method used by Honeycomb, (Will) his character

2
them in the education of their disciples 337 His discourse with the Spectator in the play-

house

4
HABITS, different, arising from different pro- His adventure with a Pict

41
fessions
197 Throws his watch into the Thames

77
Hamadryads, the fable of them to the honour of His knowledge of mankind

105
589 His letter to the Spectator

131
Hamlet's reflections on looking upon Yorick's His notion of a man of wit

151
skull
404 His boasts

151
Handkerchief, the great machine for moving His artifice

156
pity in a tragedy

His great insight into gallantry

265
Handsome people generally fantastical 144 His application to rich widows

311
The Spectator's list of some handsome ladies 144 His dissertation on ike usefulness of looking-
Happiness, (true) an enemy to pomp and noise 15 glasses

325
The happiness of souls in heaven treated of 600 His observation on the corruption of the age 352
An argument that God has assigned us for it 600 He gives the club a brief account of his
Hard words ought not to be pronounced right

amours and disappointments

359
by well bred ladies
45 His adventure with Sukey

410
Hardness of heart in parents towards their chil- Resolved not to marry without advice of
dren most inexcusable
181 friends

475
Harlot, a description of one out of the Proverbs 410 His translation from the French of an epi-
Harris, (Mr.) the organ-builder, his proposal

552 gram written by Martial, in honour of the
Harry Terset, and his lady; their way of living 100 beauty of his wife Cleopatra

490
Hate; why a man ought not to hate even his His letters to the Spectator

499, 511
125 Marries a country girl

530
Head-dress, the most variable thing in nature 98 Honour to be described only by negatives 35
Extravagantly high in the fourteenth century 98 The genealogy of true honour

35
With what success attacked by a monk of And of false honour

35
98 Wherein commendable
Heads never the wiser for being bald

497
And when to be exploded

99
Health, the pleasure of the fancy more condu- Honours in this world under no regulation 219
cive to it than those of the understanding 411 Hoods, coloured, a new invention

265
Hearts, a visior of them
587 Hope, passion of, treated

471
Heathen philosopher

150 Folly of it when misemployed on temporal
Heaven, its glory
580 objects

535
Described by Mr. Cowley

590 Instanced in the fable of Alnaschar, the Per.
The notions several nations have of it 600 sian glassman
What Dr. Tillotson says of it
600 Hopes and fears, necessary passions

224
Meaven and hell, the notions of, conformable Horace, takes fire at every hint of the Iliad and
to the light of nature
447 Odyssey

417
Heavens, verses on the glory of them

465 His recommendatory letter to Claudius Nero,
Hebrew Idioms run into English
405 in behalf of his friend Septimus

493
Heirs and elder brothers spoiled in their educa- Hotspur, (Jeffry,) Esq. his petition from the
tion
123 country infirmary

429
Henpecked husbands described
179 Hudibras, a description of his beard

334
Heraclitus, a remarkable saying of his 487 Human nature, the same in all reasonable crea-
Hermit
, his saying to a lewd young fellow 575 tures, the best study

408
Herod and Mariamne, their story from Josephus 171 Humanity not regarded by the fine gentlemen
Herodotus, wherein condemned by the Spec-

520
tator

483 Humour, (good) the best companion in the coun-
Heroes in English tragedy generally lovers 40

try

424
Heroism, an essay upon ít
601 The two extremes of humour

617
Hesiod's saying of a virtuous life

447
Burlesque

616
Hoteroptic, who so to be called

250
Pedantic

617
Hi pa, ihe Chinese Antediluvian princess, her Hunting, the use of it

116
story
584 Reproved

583

enemies

that age

.

535

of the age

.

No.

courts

No
Husbands, an ill custom among them

178 Where it falls short of the understanding 42
Rules for marrying them, by the widow's club 561 How affected by similitudes

42
Qualities necessary to make good ones 607 As liable to pain as pleasure ; how much of
Hush, (Peter) his character
457 either it is capable

42
Hymen a revengeful deity
530 The power of the Almighty over it

421
Hymn, David's pastoral one on Providence 441 | Imagining, the art of it in general

421
On gratitude

453 Imma, the daughter of Charles the Great, her
On the glories of heaven and earth
455 story

181
Hypocrisy, the honour and justice done by it Immortality of the soul, arguments in proof of it 111
to religion

243 The benefits arising from a contemplation of it 210
The various kinds of hypocrisy

399 Impertinent and trifling persons, their triumph 432
To be preferred to open impiety

458 Impertinents, several sorts of them described 148, 168
Impudence gets the better of modesty

2
IAMBIC verse, the most proper for Greek tra- Impudence: an impudence committed by the
gedies

39
eyes

20
James, how polished by love

71 Definition of English, Scotch, and Irish im-
Jane, (Mrs.) a great pickthank

272 pudence
lapsis’s cure of Æneas, a translation of Virgil by Recommended by some as good breeding 231
Mr. Dryden
572 Distinguished from assurance

373
Ichneumon, a great destroyer of crocodiles' eggs 126 Most proper means to avoid the imputation
Ideas, how a whole set of them hang together 416 of it

390
Idiot, the story of one by Dr. Plot
447 Mistaken for wit

413
Idiots in great request in most of the German Independent minister, the behaviour of one at

47 his examination of a scholar, who was in
Idle and innocent, few know how to be so 411 election to be admitted into the college of
Idle world

624 which he was governor
Idleness, a great distemper

316 Indian Kings, some of their observations during
Idol; coffee-house idols

18 their stay here
Idolatry, the offspring of mistaken devotion 211 Indifference in marriage, not to be tasted by
Idols, who of the fair sex so called

73 sensible spirits
Jealousy described

170 Indigo, the merchant, a man of great intelligence 136
How to be allayed

171 Indiscretion, more hurtful than ill nature
An exquisite torment

178 Indisposition; a man under any, whether real
Jest, how it should be utrored

616 or imaginary, ought not to be admitted into
Jesuits, their great sagacity in discovering the

company

143
talent of a young student
307 Indolence, what

100
Jews, considered by the Spectator in relation to An enemy to virtue

316
their number, dispersion, and adherence to Infidelity, another term for ignorance

180
their religion

495 Infirmary, one for good humour 429, 437, 410
The reasons assigned for it

495 A farther account of it from the country 40
The veneration paid by them to the name of Ingolstan, (Charles) of Barbican, his cures
God

531 Ingratitude, a vice inseparable from a lustful
Jezebels, who so called
175 Riind

491
Jilt, a penitent one

401 Initial letters, the use party writers make of
Jilts described

187 them
Iliad, the reading of it like travelling through a An instance of it

567
country uninhabited
417 Criticisms upon it

568
Ill nature an imitator of zeal

185 Injuries, how to be measured
Imaginary beings in poetry
419 Inkle and Yarico, their story

11
Instances in Ovid, Virgil, and Milton 419 Innocence, not quality, an exemption from re-
Imagination, its pleasures in some respects

proof
equal to those of the understanding, in Inquisitive tempers exposed
some preferable
411 Instinct, the power of it in brutes

190
Their extent

411 The several degrees of it in different animals 519
The advantages of the pleasures of imagina- Integrity, great care to be taken of it

557
tion

411 Interest, often a promoter of persecuron 185
What is meant by them

411 The way to promote our interest in the world 394
Two kinds of them

411 Intrepidity of a just good man taken from Ho-
Awaken the faculties of the mind, without

615
fatiguing or perplexing it

411 Invention, the most painful action of the mind 467
More conducive to health than those of the Invitation, the Spectator's to all artificers, as
understanding

411 well as philosophers to assist him 428, 412
Raised by other
senses as well as the sight 412 A general one

4412
The cause of them not to be assigned 413 John-a-Nokes and John-e-Stiles, their petition 577
Works of art not so perfect as those of nature Jolly, (Frank, Esq.) his memorial from the coun-
to entertain the imagination

414 try Infirmary
The secondary pleasures of the fancy 416 Jonson, (Ben) an epitaph written by him on a
The power of it

416
lady

33
Whence its secondary pleasures proceed 416 Journal: a week of a deceased citizen's, pre-
Of a wider and more universal nature than sented by Sir Andrew Freeport to the
those it has when joined with sight
418 Spectator's club

317
How poetry contributes to its pleasures 419 The use of such a journal

317
How historians, philosophers, and other writ- Iras, her character
420, 421 Irish-gentlemen, widow hunters

561
The delight it takes in enlarging itself by des Irony, who deal in it

430
grees, as in the survey of the earth, and the Irresolution, from whence arising

151
universe
421 Irus's fear of poverty, and effects of it

114
When it works from great things to little

421

The great artifice of Irus

race

ers

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

ance

[ocr errors]

man

No.

No.
Isadas, the Spartan, his valour

564 | Leo X. a great lover of buffoons and coxcombs 497
Italian writers, florid and wordy

In what manner reproved for it by a priest 497
Julian, the emperor; an excellent passage out Leonora, her character

37
of his Cæsars, relating to the imitation of The description of her country seat

37
the gods

634 Leontine and Eudoxus, their great friendship
July and August, (the months of) described 425 and advantages

123
June, (month of) described

425 Leopold, last emperor of that name, an expert
Jupiter, his first proclamation about griefs and joiner

353
calamities

558 Lesbia's letter to the Spectator, giving an ac-
His second

559

count how she was deluded by her lover 611
His just distribution of them

559 Letter to Spectator, complaining of masquerade 8
Jupiter Ammon, answer of his oracle to the From the opera-lion

14
Athenians

207 From the under-sexton of Covent-garden parish 14
Justice, to be esteemed as the first quality in From the undertaker of the masquerade 14

one who is in a post of power and direction 479 From one who had been to see the opera of
The Spartans famous for it
564 Rinaldo, and the puppet-show

14
From Charles Lillie

16
KENNET, (Dr.) his account of country wakes 161 From the president of the Ugly Club 17
Kimbow, (Thomas) states his case in a letter to From S. C. with a complaint against the starers 20
the Spectator

24 From Tho. Prone, who acted the wild boar
* King Lear,' a tragedy, suffers in the alteration 40 that was killed by Mrs. Tofts

22
Kissing-dances censured

67 From William Screne and Ralph Simple
Kitty, a famous town girl
187 From an actor

22
Knowledge, the pursuit of it long but not tedious 94 From King Latinus

22
The only means to extend life beyond its na- From Tho. Kimbow

24
tural dimensions

94 From Will Fashion to his would-be acquaint-
The main source of knowledge
287

24
Ought to be communicative

379 From Mary Tuesday, on the same subject 24
Rules for knowledge of one's self

399 From a valetudinarian to the Spectator 25

From some persons to the Spectator's clergy-
LABOUR, bodily, of two kinds
115

27
Lacedæmonians, delicacies in their sense of glory 188 From one who would be inspector of the
A form of prayer used by them
207 sign-posts

28
Ladies not to mind party

607 From the master of the show at Charing-cross 28
Lady's library described

37 From a member of the Amorous Club at Oxford 30
Ladylove, (Bartholomew) his petition to Spec- From a member of the Ugly Club

32
tator

334 From a gentleman to such ladies as are pro-
Laertes, his character in distinction to that of Irus 114 fessed beauties

33
Lætitia and Daphne, their story,

From the Spectator to T. D. containing an in-
Lampoons, written by people that cannot spell 16 tended regulation of the play-houses 36
Witty lampoons inflict wounds that are in- From the play-house thunderer

36
curable

23 From the Spectator to an affected very witty
The inhuman barbarity of the ordinary scrib-

38
blers of lampoons

23 From a married man, with a complaint that
*Lancashire Witches,' a comedy, censured 141 his wife painted

41
Landscape, a pretty one

414 From Abraham Froth, a member of the heb
Language, English, much adulterated during domadal Meeting in Oxford

43
165 From a husband plagued with a gospel-gossip 46
Language, (licentious) the brutality of it 400 From an ogling-master

46
Languages, (European) cold to the Oriental 405 From the Spectator, to the president and fel-
Lapirius, his great generosity
248 lows of the Ugly Club

48
Lapland ode translated
406 From Hecatissa to zhe Spectator

48
Larvati, who so called among the ancients 32 From an old Begu

48
Lath, (Squire,) hath a good estate, which he From Epping, with account of a company of
would part withal for a pair of legs to his

strollers

48
mind

32 From a lady, complaining of a passage in the
Latimer, the martyr, his behaviour at a conser.

Funeral

51
ence with the Papists

465 From Hugh Goblin, president of the Ugly Club 52
Latin of great use in a country auditory 221 Fron Q. R. concerning laughter

52
Laughter, (immoderate) a sign of pride
47 The Spectator's answer

52
A counterpoise to the spleen

249 From R. B. to the Spectator, with a proposal
What
persons the most accomplished to raise it 249 relating to the education of lovers

53
A poetical figure of laughter out of Milton 249 From Anna Bella

53
The distinguishing faculty in man
494 From a splenetic gentleman

53
Indecent in any religious assembly

630 From a reformed starer, complaining of a peeper 53
Law-suits, the misery of them
456 From King Latinus

53
Lawyers divided into the peaceable and litigious 21 From a gentleman at Cambridge, an
Both sorts described

21 count of a new sect of philosophers called
Leaf, (green) swarms with millions of animals 420 Loungers

54
Learning ought not to claim any merit to itself, From Celimene

66
but upon the application of it

6 From a father, complaining of the liberties
The design of learning
350 taken in country-dances

66
To be made advantageous to meanest capa-

From James to Betty

71
cities

353 To the Spectator, from the Ugly Club at
Men of learning, who take to business, best Cambridge

78
for it
469 From a whimsical young lady

79
Highly necessary to a man of fortune 506 From B. D. desiring a catalogue of books for
Lee, the poet, well tumed for tragedy
39 the female library

79

33

man

the war

ac-

« AnteriorContinuar »