Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

como estoy en su buena gracia. The empress is dead long since, and the emperor is so sickly, or rather so sick, that they forbear to bury her with solemnity, as conceiving, that he will save charge by dying shortly. They say here, that the business of Bohemia is growing towards an end by composition.

Brussels, this 14th of Feb. 1619.

TO THE MARQUIS OF BUCKINGHAM.

My very good Lord,

For the services committed to Sir Lionel Cranfield, after his majesty hath spoken with him, I shall attend and follow his majesty's pleasure and directions, and yield my best care, advice, and endeavour for performance.

In the pretermitted duty I have some profit, and more was to have had if queen Anne had lived. Wherefore I shall become an humble suitor to his majesty, that I may become no loser, specially seeing the business had been many a time and oft quite overthrown, if it had not been upheld only, or chiefly, by myself; so that whatsoever service hath been since done, is upon my foundation.

Mr. Attorney (a) groweth pretty pert with me of late; and I see well who they are that maintain him. But be they flies, or be they wasps, I neither care for buzzies nor stings, most especially in any thing, that concerneth my duty to his majesty, or my love to your lordship.

I forgot not, in my public charge, the last StarChamber-day, to publish his majesty's honour for his late commission for the relief of the poor, and suppressing vagabonds; as also his gracious intention touching informers, which, I perceive, was received with much applause. That of projectors I spake not of, because it is not yet ripe, neither doth it concern the

(a) Sir Henry Yelverton.

execution of any law, for which my speech was proper. God ever preserve and prosper you.

Your Lordship's most obliged friend

February 17,1619.

and faithful servant,

FR. VERULAM, Canc.

TO THE MARQUIS OF BUCKINGHAM.

My very good Lord,

I SEND, by post, this sealed packet, containing my lord of Suffolk's answer in the Star-Chamber. I received it this evening at six of the clock, by the hands of the master of the Rolls (a), sealed as it is with my lord of Suffolk's seal, and the master's of the Rolls. But neither I, nor the master of the Rolls, know what is in it; but it cometh first to his majesty's sight. Only I did direct, that because the authentic copy, unto which my lord is sworn, according to the course of the court, is not so fit for his majesty's reading, my lord of Suffolk should send withal a paper copy, which his majesty might read with less trouble. My lady Suffolk is so ill of the small-pox, as she is not yet fit to make any answer.

Bingley's (b) answer is come in, a long one; and, as I perceive, with some things impertinent, yea, and unfit. Of that I confer with Mr. Solicitor (c) to-morrow; and then I will farther advertise your lordship. God ever preserve and prosper you.

Your Lordship's most obliged friend

York-house, this 23d of Feb. 1619, at nine of the clock [1619-20.]

and faithful servant,

FR. VERULAM, Canc.

(6) Sir John Bingley's.

(a) Sir Julius Cæsar.
(c) Sir Thomas Coventry.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR.

Most honoured Lord,

I Do even now receive this letter from the Conde DO de Gondomar, with direction I should send it, since I am not there to deliver it, to Mr. Wyche, that so he may present it to your lordship's hand at such time, as it may be of most use to him. He commands me besides, that for his sake I should become a humble solicitor to your lordship for this friend of his, which I presume to do the more willingly, because this party is a great friend of mine, and so are also many of his friends my friends. Besides he wills me to represent his great thanks to your lordship, for the just favours you have been pleased to vouchsafe to Mr. Wyche already, the rather in contemplation of the Conde, as he hath been informed. And if in the company, or rather in the attendance of so great an intercessor, it be not an unpardonable kind of ill manners to intrude myself, I presume to cast myself at your lordship's feet, with protestation, that I shall be very particularly bound to your lordship's goodness for any favour, with justice, that he shall obtain.

I beseech Jesus keep your lordship ever intirely happy; and so doing all humble reverence, I take leave.

Brussels,

Your Lordship's most humble

this 26th of Feb. 1619.

and most obliged servant,

TOBIE MATTHEW.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (a).

My honourable Lord,

UNDERSTANDING, that there hath been a long and tedious suit depending in the chancery between Robert D'Oyley and his wife, plaintiffs, and Leonard

(a) Harl. MSS. Vol. 7006.

Lovace, defendant; which cause hath been heretofore ended by award, but is now revived again, and was, in Michaelmas term last, fully heard before your lordship; at which hearing your lordship did not give your opinion thereof, but were pleased to defer it, until breviats were delivered on both sides; which, as I am informed, hath been done accordingly: now my desire unto your lordship is, that you will be pleased to take some time, as speedily as your lordship may, to give your opinion thereof, and so make a final end, as your lordship shall find the same in equity to deserve. For which I will ever rest

Your Lordship's faithful friend and servant,

Windsor, May 18, 1620.

G. BUCKINGHAM.

TO THE MARQUIS OF BUCKINGHAM.

My very good Lord,

I WENT to Kew for pleasure, but I met with pain. But neither pleasure nor pain can withdraw my mind from thinking of his majesty's service. And because his majesty shall see how I was occupied at Kew, I send him these papers of rules for the Star-Chamber, wherein his majesty shall erect one of the noblest and durablest pillars for the justice of this kingdom in perpetuity, that can be, after, by his own wisdom, and the advice of his lords, he shall have revised them, and established them. The manner and circumstances I refer to my attending his majesty. The rules are not all set down; but I will do the rest within two or three days. I ever remain

Your Lordship's most obliged friend

June 9, 1620.

and faithful servant,

FR. VERULAM, Canc.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (a).
My very good Lord,

SUCH is my haste at this time, that I cannot write so largely to yourself, as I would, in the business of the steel, in which once already I sent to your lordship, and in which I only desire the good of the commonwealth, and the service of my master. I therefore have sent this bearer, my servant, unto you, and committed the relation of the business to him. And I do intreat your lordship to give credit to what he shall deliver your lordship therein, with your lawful assistance of my desires; wherein I doubt not but you shall do a very good office. And I shall rest ready to requite your courtesy; and, with my best wishes,

continue

Egham, July 6, 1620.

Your very loving friend,

Indorsed,

G. BUCKINGHAM.

My Lord Marquis in the behalf of his servant, Mr. Porter, and Mr. Dallington.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (b).
My honourable Lord,

His Majesty having made a reference of business to your lordship, concerning Sir Robert Douglas and Mr. David Ramsey, two of his highness's servants, whom he loveth, and whom I wish very well unto; I have thought fit to desire you to shew them all the favour your lordship may therein: which I will acknowledge, and ever rest

Your Lordship's faithful friend and servant,

Farnham,

the last of August, 1620.

G. BUCKINGHAM.

(a) Harl. MSS. Vol. 7000.

(b) Ibid.

« AnteriorContinuar »