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WHEREAS there dependeth before me in chancery a great cause of tithes concerning the benefices of London, though in a particular, yet, by consequence leading to a general; his majesty, out of a great religious care of the state, both of Church and city, is graciously pleased, that before any judicial sentence be pronounced in chancery, there be a commission directed unto me, the lord chancellor, lord treasurer, the lord privy-seal, and the lord chamberlain; and likewise to the lord archbishop, the lord bishop of Winchester (a) and the bishop of Ely (b), and also to the master of the rolls (c), the two lord chief justices (d),justice Dodderidge, and justice Hutton, who formerly assisted me in the cause, to treat of some concord in a reasonable moderation between the ministers and the mayor and the commonalty of London in behalf of the citizens; and to make some pact and transaction between them by consent, if it may be; or otherwise to hear and certify their opinions touching the cause, that thereupon his majesty may take such farther order, by directing of a proceeding in chancery, or by some other course, as to his wisdom shall seem fit.

You will have care to draw the commission with some preface of honour to his majesty, and likewise to insert in the beginning of the commission, that it

(a) Dr. James Montagu.

(b) Dr. Lancelot Andrews.

(c) Sir Julius Cæsar.

(d) Sir Henry Montagu of the King's Bench, and Sir Henry Hobart of the Common Pleas.

was de advisamento cancellarii (as it was indeed) lest it should seem to be taken from the court. So I commit you to God's &c.

Jan. 19, 1617.

FR. BACON, Canc.

TO THE MARQUIS OF BUCKINGHAM.

My very good Lord,

I Do not easily fail towards gentlemen of quality to disgrace them. For I take myself to have some interest in the good wills of the gentlemen of England, which I keep and cherish for his majesty's special service. And for this gentleman, of whom you write, Sir John Cotton, I know no cause in the world, why I should have displaced him, but that it was certified unto me, that it was his own desire to resign: wherein if I was abused, I will restore him. But if he did consent, and, now it is done, changeth his mind, then I would be loth to disgrace the other, that is come in. Therefore I pray your lordship, that I may know and be informed from himself what passed touching his consent; and I will do him reason.

Thus, with my thanks to your lordship, I will

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To the Marquis of Buckingham, concerning Sir John Cotton's resigning the place of Custos Rotulorum of Cambridgeshire.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (a).
My honourable Lord,

I THANK your lordship for your favour to Sir George Tipping, in giving liberty unto him to make his appearance before you after the holy-days, at my request; who, as I understand by some friends of mine, who moved me to recommend him to your lordship's favour, is willing to conform himself in performance of the decree made in the chancery by your lordship's predecessor, but that he is persuaded, that presently, upon the performance thereof, his son will make away the land that shall be conveyed unto him : which being come to Sir George from his ancestors, he desireth to preserve to his posterity. I desire your lordship's farther favour therefore unto him, that you will find out some course, how he may be exempted from that fear of the sale of his lands, whereof he is ready to acknowledge a fine to his son, and to his heirs by Anne Pigot; and, they failing, to his son's heirs males, and, for want thereof, to any of his son's or brethren's heirs males, and so to the heirs general of his father and himself, by lineal descent, and the remainder to the crown. This offer, which seemeth very reasonable, and for his majesty's advantage, I desire your lordship to take into your consideration, and to shew him what favour you may for my sake; which I will readily acknowledge, and ever rest

Your Lordship's faithful servant,

Newmarket, Jan. 23, 1617.

G. BUCKINGHAM.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (b).
My honourable Lord,

SINCE I received your lordship's letter, Sir Lionel Cranfield being here, hath informed his majesty of the whole proceeding in his business of the houshold;

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which his majesty liketh very well, and is glad it is approved by your lordship, of whose care and pains therein he receiveth very good satisfaction.

In the business touching Sir John Cotton, your lordship dealeth as nobly as can be desired; and so, if it should come in question before his majesty, I would answer in your behalf. I leave Sir John Cotton to inform your lordship by his letter of the business, and

ever rest

Your Lordship's faithful servant,

Newmarket, Jan. 24, 1617.

G. BUCKINGHAM.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (a).

My honourable Lord,

I HAVE been intreated by a gentleman, whom I much respect, to recommend to your lordship's favour Mr. John Huddy, between whom and Mr. Richard Huddy there is, as I am informed, a cause to be heard before your lordship, in the chancery, on Saturday next. My desire unto your lordship is, that you would shew the said John Huddy what favour you lawfully may, and as his cause will bear, when it cometh before you, for my sake. Which I will not fail to acknowledge, ever resting

Your Lordship's faithful servant,

Newmarket, Jan. 28, 1617,

G. BUCKINGHAM.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (b).

My honourable Lord,

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I UNDERSTAND that his majesty hath been pleased to refer a suit unto him by two of his servants, Robert Maxwell and John Hunt, for the making of sheriffs and escheators patents, to your lordship's 'con

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sideration. My desire unto your lordship on their behalf is, that you would shew them thus much favour for my sake, and with as much expedition as may be, and your lordship's other occasions may permit, to certify your opinion thereof unto his majesty; which I will be ready to acknowledge, and ever rest Your Lordship's faithful servant,

Newmarket, Feb. 4, 1617.

G. BUCKINGHAM.

TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR (a).

My honourable Lord,

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THOUGH I had resolved not to write to your lordship in any matter between party and party; yet at the earnest request of my noble friend, the lord Norris, to whom I account myself much beholden, I could not but recommend unto your lordship's favour a special friend of his, Sir Thomas Monk, who hath a suit before your lordship in the chancery (b) with Sir Robert Basset; which, upon the report made unto me thereof, seemeth so reasonable, that I doubt not but the cause itself will move your lordship to favour him, if upon the hearing thereof it shall appear the same unto your lordship, as at the first sight it doth unto me. I therefore desire your lordship to shew in this particular what favour you lawfully may, for my sake, who will account it as done unto myself; and will ever rest

Your Lordship's faithful servant,

Newmarket, Feb. 4, 1617.

(a) Harl. MSS. Vol. 7006.

G. BUCKINGHAM.

(b) Lord Bacon was afterwards accused by the House of Commons of having received of Sir Thomas Monk 100 pieces; which he did not deny, but alledged, that it was after the suit was ended.

VOL. VI.

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