Oriental Tales: Translated Into English Verse

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J. Hatchard, 1805 - 123 páginas
 

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Página xv - Titian we must turn our eyes to find excellence with regard to colour, and light and shade, in the highest degree. He was both the first and the greatest master of this art. By a few strokes he knew how to mark the general image and character of whatever object he attempted; and pro'duced, by this alone, a truer representation than his master Giovanni Bellino, or any of his predecessors, who finished every hair. His great care was to express the general colour, to preserve the masses of light and...
Página xix - Where broad cloth breathes, to talk where cushions strive, And all, but Sir, or Madam, looks alive I...
Página 6 - Impatience stung the warbler's soul, Greatly he spurn'd the mean control ; And from the verdant turf uprear'd, He on his friend contemptuous leer'd ; Stretch'd his lean neck, and wildly stared, His dulcet pitch-pipe then prepared, His flaky ears prick'd up withal, And stood in posture...
Página xii - If .we examine with a critical view the manner of those painters whom we consider as patterns, we shall find that their great fame does not proceed from their works being more highly finished...
Página xv - His great care was to express the general color, to preserve the masses of light and shade, and to give by opposition the idea of that solidity which is inseparable from natural objects. When those are preserved, though the work should possess no other merit, it will have in a proper place its complete effect ; but where any of...
Página xiv - ... proof. It is to Titian we must turn our eyes to find excellence with regard to colour, and light and shade, in the highest degree. He was both the first and the greatest master of this art. By a few strokes he knew how to mark the general image and character of whatever object he attempted; and produced, by this alone, a truer representation than his master Giovanni Bellini, or any of his predecessors, who finished every hair.
Página xiv - ... whole, whether it was the general composition, or the composition of each individual figure ; for every figure may be said to be a lesser whole, though in regard to the general work to which it belongs, it is but a part ; the same may be said of the head, of the hands, and feet. Though he possessed...
Página xiii - ... not proceed from their works being more highly finished than those of other artists, or from a more minute attention to details, but from that enlarged comprehension which sees the whole object at once, and that energy of art which gives its characteristic effect by adequate expression. Raffaelle and Titian are two names which stand the highest in our art ; one for Drawing, the other for Painting.
Página xiv - ... said to be a lesser whole, though in regard to the general work to which it belongs, it is but a part : the same may be said of the head, of the hands, and feet. Though he possessed this art of seeing and comprehending the whole, as far as form is concerned, he did not exert the same faculty in regard to the general effect, which is presented to the eye by co- lour, and light and shade.
Página 5 - A proverb that, in sense, surpasses The brains combined of stags and asses : Yet, for I must thy perils trace, Sweet bulbul * of the long-ear'd race ! Soft soul of harmony ! yet hear ; If thou wilt rashly charm our ear, And with thy warblings, loud and deep, Unseal the leaden eye of sleep ; Roused by thy song, and arm'd with staves, The gard'ner, and a host of slaves, • The Persian word for Nightingale.

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