The penny cyclopædia [ed. by G. Long]., Volumen22

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Página 95 - Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land: and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you, to inherit them for a possession ; they shall be your bondmen forever : but over your brethren the children of Israel, ye shall not rule one over another with rigor.
Página 209 - And he spake three thousand proverbs: and his songs were a thousand and five. And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he epake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Página 159 - ... serve only to expose the person who affects to practise them, to the suspicion of being a greater knave than most of his neighbours.
Página 216 - The Security of Englishmen's Lives; or the Trust, Power, and Duty of the Grand Juries of England, explained...
Página 217 - An Act for the Amendment of the Law and the better Advancement of Justice...
Página 189 - ... agricultural operations; and if a considerable depth of loam is found, which neither retains water too long nor allows it to percolate too rapidly, it may be looked upon as a soil eminently capable of the highest degree of cultivation, and on which no judicious outlay of labour will ever cause loss or disappointment to the cultivator.
Página 29 - I. 26. It will appear after I. 32 that two triangles which have two angles of the one equal to two angles of the other, each to each, have also their third angles equal. Hence we are able to include the two cases of I.
Página 246 - The rhymes of the last six lines are capable of many arrangements ; but by far the worst, and also the least common in Italy, is that we usually adopt, the fifth and sixth rhyming together, frequently after a full pause, so that the sonnet ends with the point of an epigram. The best form, as the Italians hold, is the rhyming together of the three uneven and the three even lines; but, as our language is less rich in consonant terminations...
Página 248 - When the wind sets in from the north-east, it produces a wonderful change in the face of the country. The grass soon becomes dry and withered ; the rivers subside very rapidly, and many of the trees shed their leaves. About this period is commonly felt the harmattan, a dry and parching wind, blowing...
Página 272 - Breathings of the Spirit, and therefore much beyond those carnal Ordinances of Sense and Reason, supported by Industry and Study; and this they call a saving Way of Preaching, as it must be confessed to be a way to save much Labour, and nothing else that I know of.

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