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I've USE OF THE LAW: PROVIDED FOR PRESERVA-

ALL Persons, Goods, AND Good

NAMES.

What the Use of the Law principally consisteth

in..

247

Surety to keep the peace..

247

Action of the case, for slander, battery, &c.... 247

Appeal of murder given to the next of kin.... 247

Manslaughter, and when a forfeiture of goods,

and wlien not.......

248

Felo de se, felony by mischance, deodand.... 248

Cutting out of tongues, and putting out of eyes,

made felony.......

248

The office of the constable .

218

Two high constables for every hundred, and

one petty constable for every village .. 248

The King's Bench first instituted, and in what

matters they anciently had jurisdiction... 248

The court of Marshalsea erected, and its juris-

diction within twelve miles of the chief tun-

nel of the king, which is the full extent of

the verge......

248

Sheriff's Tourn instituted upon the division of

England into counties : the charge of this

court was committed to the earl of the

same county

249

Subdivision of the county courts into hundreds 249

The charge of the county taken from the earls,

and committed yearly to such persons as

it pleased the king....

249

The sheriff is judge of all hundred courts not

given away from the crown....

249

County courts kept monthly by the sheriff.... 249

The office of the sheriff....

249

Hundred courts, to whom first granted..... 249

Lord of the hundred to appoint two high con-

stables......

249

Of what matters they inquire of in leets and

law-days...

249

Conservators of the peace, and what their office

249

Conservators of the peace by virtue of their

office

250

Justices of peace ordained in lieu of conserva-

tors; of placing and displacing of justices

of peace by use delegated from the king to

the chancellor ......

..., 250

Che power of the justice of peace to fine the

offenders to the crown, and not to recom-

pense the party grieved.....

250

Authority of the justices of peace, through

whom ran all the county services to the

250

Beating, killing, burning of houses..... 250

Artachments for surety of the peace.......

250

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Recognisance of the peace delivered by the

justices at their sessions....

250

Quarter-sessions held by the justices of peace. 250

The authority of justices of the peace out of

their sessions....

250

Judges of assize came in place of the ancient

judges in eyre, about the time of R. H.... 251

England divided into six circuits, and two

learned men in the laws assigned by the

king's commission to ride twice a year

through those shires allotted to that circuit,

for the trial of private titles to lands and

goods, and all treasons and felonies, which

the county courts meddle not in......... 251

The authority of the judges in eyre translated

by Parliament to justices of assize...... 251

The authority of the justice of assizes much

lessened by the Court of Common Pleas,

erected in Henry IIl's. time...... 251

The justices of assize have at this day five

commissions by which they sit, viz., 1.

Oyer and Terminer. 2. Jail Delivery. 3.

To take assizes. 4. To take Nisi Prius.

251

Book allowed to clergy for the scarcity of

them to be disposed in religious houses.. 252

The course the judges hold in their circuits in

the execution of their commission concern-

ing the taking of Nisi Prius....... 253

The justices of the peace and the sheriff are to

attend the judges in their county........ 253

Of property of lands to be gained by entry.. 253

Land lest by the sea belongeth to the king..... 253

Property of lands by descent..

254

Three rules of descent..

254

Customs of certain places..

254

Every heir having land is bound by the binding

acts of his ancestors, if he be named..... 254

Property of lands by escheat.....

255

In escheat two things are to be observed. 255

Concerning the tenure of lands....

..... 255

The reservations in knight's service tenure are

four. ......

256

Homage and fealty...

256

Knight's service in capite is a tenure de per-

sona regis......

256

Grand serjeantry, petty serjeantry....

256

The institution of soccage in capite, and that

it is now turned into moneys rents...... 256

Ancient demesne, what....

255

ONice of alienation...

256

How manors were at first created............ 256

Knight's service tenure reserved to common

persons......

Soccage tenure reserved by the lord.

257

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Villenage or tenure by copy of court-roll...... 257 Legacies are to be paid before debts by shop

Court baron, with the use of it.......

257

books, bills unsealed, or contracts by word 266

What attainders shall give the escheat to the An executor may pay which legacy he will first

lord......

257

Or if the executors do want, they may sell

Prayer of clergy..

257

any legacy to pay debts.....

266

He that standeth mute forfeiteth no lands, ex-

When a will is made, and no executor nanied,

cept for treason.....

258

administration is to be committed cum tes-

He that killeth himself forfeiteth but his

tamento annexo.

266

258

Flying for felony a forfeiture of goods... 259 ARGUMENTS ix Law IN CERTAIN GREAT AND

Lands entailed, escheat to the king for treason 258 DIFFICULT Cases....

267

A person attainted may purchase, but it shall The Case of Impeachment of Waste.

268

be to the king's use.....

258

The Argument in Low's Case of Tenures.... 276

Property of lands by conveyance is first distri-

The Case of Revocation of Uses...

230

buted into estates, for years, for life, in tail,

The Jurisdiction of the Marches.

285

and fee simple....

259

TUE LEARNED READING OF Mr. Francis Ba-
Lease for years go to the executors, and not 10

con, UPON THE STATUTE or Uses, being

the heirs.......

259

his double reading to the Honourable So-

Leases, by what means they are forfeitable.... 259

ciety of Gray's Inn, 42 Eliz.......... 295

What livery of seisin is, and how it is requisite

to every estate for life.......

259 THE OFFICE OF CONSTABLES, ORIGINAL AND

Of the new device, called a perpetuity, which

Use of Court's LEET, SHERIFF's Torx,

is an entail with an addition.....

260

&c., with the Answers to the Questions

The inconveniences of these perpetuities..... 260 propounded by Sir Alexander Hay, Knt.,

The last and greatest estate in land is fee

touching the Office of Constables........ 315

simple.......

260

AN ACCOUNT OF THE LATELY

The difference between a remainder and a

ERECTED SER-

reversion..

260

VICE, CALLED THE OFFICE OF COMPOSI-

What a fine is..

261

TIONS FON ALIENATIOXS.

319

What recoveries are.

261

What a use is..

262

THE GREAT INSTAURATION OF LORD

A conveyance to stand seised to a use.

262

BACON.

Of the continuance of land by will....

262

Property in goods: 1. By gift. 2. By sale.

Editor's Preface..

329

3. By stealing. 4. By waving. 5. By

Introduction.

332

straying. 6.

333

By shipwreck.

7. By

Dedication..

forfeiture.

264

8. By executorship..

334

Preface .....

By letters of administration.....

265

Distribution of the Work..

338

Where the intestate had bona notabilia in

divers dioceses, then the archbishop of

SECOND PART OF THE GREAT INSTAURATION.

that province where he died is to commit

THE Noycm ORGANUM; OR, FIVE SUGGES

administration ....

265

THE INTERPRETATION

An executor may refuse the executorship before

NATURE..

3:13

the bishop, if he have not intermeddled

Preface.....

343

with the goods......

265

Summary of the Second Part, digested in

An executor ought to pay, 1. Judgments. 2.

Aphorisms....

345

Stat. Recog. 3, Debts by bonds and bills

Aphorisms on the Interpretation of Nature and

sealed. 4. Rent unpaid. 5. Servants'

the Empire of Man....

315

wages. 6. Head workmen. 7. Shop

The Second Book of Aphorisms on the Inter-

book, and contracts by word...... 265

pretation of Nature, or the Reign of Man 37)

Debts due in equal degree of record, the execu-

tor may pay which of them he pleases A PREPARATION FOR A NATURAL AND EXPE-

before suit be commenced.

266

RIMENTAL HISTORY

4:26

But it is otherwise with administrators. ....... 266 A Description of such a Natural and Experi-
Property by legacy....

266 mental History as shall be suficient and

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THIRD PART OF THE GREAT INSTAURATION.

475

442

THE HISTORY OF LIFE AND DEATH.

To the Reader.....

467

To the present Age and Posterity.

467

The Preface....

468

The Particular Topic-Places; or, Articles of

Inquisition touching Life and Death..... 469

Nature durable, and not durable........ 470

Desiccation, prohibiting of Desiccation, and

inteneration of that which is desiccated

and dried.....

472

Length and shortness of life in living crea-

tures...

Alimentation or Nourishment; and the way of

nourishing ...

478

Length and Shortness of Life in Man.. 479

Medicines for long life......

488

The Intentions.....

489

I. The operation upon the spirits, that

they may remain youthful, and retain

their vigour.....

490

II. 'The operation upon the exclusion of

the air........

... 496

III. The operation upon the blood, and the

sanguifying heat.....

498

IV. The operation upon the juices of the

body .....

499

V. The operation upon the bowels of their

extrusion of aliment....

501

VI. The operation upon the outward parts

for their attraction of aliment....... 504

VII. The operation upon the aliment itself,

for the insinuation thereof......... 504

VIII. The operation upon the last act of assi-

milation.

505

IX. The operation upon the inteneration of

that which begins to be arefied, or the

malacissation of the body... ... 506

X. The operation upon the purging away of

old juice, and supplying of new

juice; or of renovation by turns. ... 508

The porches of death......

508

The differences of youth and old age....... 511

Movable canons of the duration of life and

form of death.......

512

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MISCELLANEOUS TRACTS, (translated from Of the variety of the bodies which yield

the Latin.)

sound; and the instruments; and of

The Ebb and Flow of the Sea.

523

the species of sounds which occur.... 540

The Alphabet of Nature....

530

Of the multiplication, majoration, diminu-

Catalogue of Bodies attractive and not attractive 532

tion, and fraction of sound........... 540

Inquisition of the Conversion of Bodies...... 533 Of the repercussion of sounds and echo..... 541

The Masculine Birth of Time.......... 533, 534 Of the consents and dissents of audibles and

The History and first Inquisition of Sound and

visibles, and of other so called spiritual

Hearing......

535

species......

541

Of the generation of sound, and the first

Of the quickness of the generation, and ex-

percussion

535

tinction of sound, and the time in which

Of the lasting of sound, and its perishing and

they are effected........

543

extinction.....

..... 537

Of the affinity, or non-affinity, which sound

Of the confusion and perturbation of sounds 537

hath with the motion, local and per-

of the accessory aids and impediments of

ceptible, of the air in which it is car-
sound; of the stay of sound; and the

ried ....

513

diversity of mediums.....

538

Of the communication of the air percussed

Of the penetration of sounds....... 538

and elided with the ambient air, and

Of the carriage of sounds, and their direction

bodies, or their spirits......

544

or spreading; and of the area which

sound fills, together and severally..... 539 | INDEX.

545

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