The true plan of a living temple; or, Man considered in his proper relation to the ordinary occupations ... of life, by the author of The morning and evening sacrifice, Volumen3

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Página 281 - For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.
Página 314 - And impotent desire and disappointed pride ? 0 how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves and garniture of fields; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And ull the dread magnificence of heaven, 0 how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven!
Página 253 - My doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew, as the small rain upon the tender herb, and as the showers upon the grass : Because I will publish the name of the Lord: ascribe ye greatness unto our God.
Página 409 - ... God declared in his word, concur in opposing that propensity to rest which belongs to the human mind ; and combine to necessitate submission to the hard yet salutary conditions under which alone the most extreme evils may be held in abeyance, and every degree of happiness enjoyed.
Página 147 - ... pillars of the world, pierces the inward caverns of the earth, and resounds from every part of the encircling heavens ; the many myriads of joyful expectants arising, changing, putting on glory, taking wing, and contending upwards, to join themselves to the triumphant heavenly host : the judgment set ; the books opened ; the frightful amazed looks of surprised wretches ; the equal administration of the final judgment ; the adjudication of all to their eternal states ; the heavens rolled up as...
Página 146 - ... here below. And if there be a suspicion of an aptness or inclination to intermeddle in them to their prejudice, to whom that part belongs, can heartily say to it (as the philosopher to the jealous tyrant,) ' we of this academy are not at leisure to mind so mean things ; we have somewhat else to do than to talk of you.
Página 288 - I have found in this writer more original thinking and observation, upon the several subjects that he has taken in hand, than in any other, not to say, than in all others put together. His talent also for illustration is unrivalled.
Página 410 - ... imagine. The mind of man, formed as it is to be more tenacious of its active habits than even of its moral dispositions, is, in the present state, trained, often at an immense cost of suffering, to the exercise of skill, of forethought, of courage, of patience ; and ought it not to be inferred — unless positive evidence contradicts the supposition, that this system of education bears some relation of fitness to the state for which it is an initiation ? Shall not the very same qualities which...
Página 80 - He neither forbade them, nor turned them back : it was his meat and his drink to do the will of his Father...
Página 408 - Every one is then bound to remember, that the personal sufferings, or peculiar vicissitudes or toils through which he is called to pass, are to be estimated and explained only in an immeasurably VOL.

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