An Analytical Inquiry Into the Principles of Taste

Portada
T. Payne, 1806 - 473 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Juvenile and imperfect Works
9
Verse
10
Compared with Music
11
Measure and Quantity
12
In Sculpture
13
3 How violated in the dead Languages 14 How far addressed to organic Sense
14
Musical and Poetical Melody
15
Distance and Direction of Sounds
16
Their Grandeur and Sublimity
17
Melody in Language
18
p
19
How changed and corrected
20
Verse considered in the Abstract I
21
With Passion Sentiment and Sympathy
22
Irregularity and Variety comparatively consi deredin Poetry and Musicin Sculpture and Painting
23
Pope and Milton
24
English Verseits Nature and Character
25
General distinct Characters of Verse and Prose
26
Verse necessary to Poetry and wherefore
27
Paradise Lost
28
English Blank Verseits Defects in Milton
29
In Thomson and Cowper
30
Its Causes 2 Primary Effects Projection 3 Distance
31
Collocation of Words Order of the Imagina
32
Its Advantages
33
Politeness or good Breeding in Language
34
Gothic Architecture military and monastic
35
Its Principles
36
Buildings of the Goths Celts Scandinavians
37
When employed in Houses and Viilas
38
Rise and Progress of Monastic or Cathedral Gothic
39
Sacred Architecture of the Greeks and Romans
40
Improperly copied and applied to Houses
41
In Decorations of Grounds 43 Ancient Coins Sec why interesting 44 Symmetryin Animals
44
In the Orders of Architecture
45
Its Reasons
46
Its Origin and Progress
47
Refinement and Excessopposed to the Gothic Principle of Contrast
48
Scale by which the Eye measures
49
Consequent Effects of Proportion in St Peters
50
And of Contrast in Gothic Cathedrals
51
Of Intricacy and Extent
52
Lightness in Sculpture and Building
53
Errors of Imitation in Principle
54
Homeric Heroes how far suited to the Stage
55
Reasons for Horaces recommending them His Character of Achilles examined
56
Ulysses of Euripides and iEneas of Virgil
57
Judgment of Virgil
58
Visible Magnitude
59
5p Pain and Terror not Sources of the Sublime 60 Mr Burkes Philosophy on the Subject
60
Not clearly understood by himself
61
Leads to Materialism
62
His progressive Scale of the Sublime
63
Contrary in its Principles to the System of Lon ginus and all others known
64
Considered in its different Graduations of Re spect
65
Astonishment and Terror as applicable to him
66
Noxious and Innocent Tame and Wild Ani mals Game Cock
70
Error of Mr Burke
79
Mr Burkes Opinion of Description examined
80
Obscurity Things distinct and Things deter minate
81
Consequences of Obscurity being thought su blime
83
Impassioned Modes of Speech Ideas Ossian
84
Sound Sense and Mental Energy in Character
85
in Description
86
Enthusiastic Language Heroic Style
87
Lyric Style Pindar Sophocles Gray
88
Miltons Imagery sometimes obscure not so in the Instance quoted by Mr Burke
89
Where really so faulty Instance
90
Influence of Authority
91
Images limited Mental Energies
92
Instances and Illustrations
93
Irritation
94
Comparative Influence of Music on the Passions
95
Fabulous Stories concerning
96
p
99
self
108
OF THE SUBLIME AND PATHETIC 1 Sympathy
111
Deduction from
113
In Taste and Manners
115
Academies their Effect on
116
Accounted
117
Mechanical and liberal Arts their Difference
118
Feeling Sentiment and Science in Painting
119
In Sculpture
120
Public Schools of Rhetoric their Effect on the Latin Language
121
Freedom of Study its Effect on the Greek
122
On the English
123
Instanced in Dr Blairs Criticism on a Passage of Pope
124
Criticism examined
125
The Passage justified by others from Euripides and Shakespeare
126
tion Order of the Understanding
127
fective
129
j All unvaried Continuity tires 2 Change therefore necessary 3 The Cause of corrupt Taste In Literature 4 In
171
j Artificial Perceptionhow far independent
172
A Imitative
206
Their moral Effects
238
OF JUDGMENT
262
Judgment in what it consists 2 Reason as applied to Taste 3 Demonstration and Analogy 4 Laws of Nature 5 In Matters of Demonstration in Matters o...
264
In different Individuals
265
In Dramatic
272
In Epic and Dramatic Poetry
275
Oratory 14 Acting
282
Fiction and Reality
283
In Painting
286
Symbolical Figures
297
Epic and Dramatic License in Fiction their Difference
309
Roman Mime of Laureolus 9 Fights of Gladiators
328
jo Why fixed and indispensable
334
Weakness False Delicacy
351
Timidity Modesty 36 Pliability Stubbornness Themistoclei 37 Tenacity in Trifles
354
Otways Venice Preservd Shakespeares Julius Caesar
356
Achilles
357
Abuse of Words
394
Truth of Expression The Laocoon 46 Michael Angelo
438

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 357 - Above them all the archangel: but his face Deep scars of thunder had intrench'd; and care Sat on his faded cheek; but under brows .Of dauntless courage, and considerate pride Waiting revenge; cruel his eye, but cast Signs of remorse and passion, to behold The fellows of his crime, the followers rather (Far other once beheld in bliss,) condemn'd For ever now to have their lot in pain...
Página 396 - Commander : he, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower : his form had yet not lost All her original brightness ; nor appear'd Less than Arch-Angel ruin'd, and the excess Of glory obscured...
Página 352 - Be innocent of the knowledge , dearest chuck , Till thou applaud the deed. — Come, seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day; And with thy bloody and invisible hand Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond Which keeps me pale!
Página 245 - THAT HE HAD A HEAD TO CONTRIVE, A TONGUE TO PERSUADE, AND A HAND TO EXECUTE ANY MISCHIEF.
Página 395 - Mighty victor, mighty lord, Low on his funeral couch he lies! No pitying heart, no eye, afford A tear to grace his obsequies.
Página 9 - I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion: but for my own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure; and can not but fancy, that an orchard in flower looks infinitely more delightful than all the little labyrinths of the most finished parterre.
Página 397 - Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams; or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Página 395 - Give ample room, and verge enough The characters of hell to* trace. Mark the year, and mark the night, When Severn shall re-echo with affright The shrieks of death, thro...
Página 369 - When danger or pain press too nearly, they are incapable of giving any delight, and are simply terrible; but at certain distances, and with certain modifications, they may be, and they are delightful, as we every day experience.
Página 395 - Fair laughs the Morn, and soft the zephyr blows, While proudly riding o'er the azure realm In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes: Youth on the prow, and Pleasure at the helm: Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, That hush'd in grim repose expects his evening prey.

Información bibliográfica