Biographia Literaria: Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary Life and Opinions

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Classic Books Company, 1834 - 351 páginas
Despite the friendship and collaborations between Samuel Coleridge?and William Wordsworth, the pair were not completely compatible in their respective?literary visions. In his Biographia Literaria, Coleridge attempts to do?what Wordsworth did in Preface to the Lyrical Ballads: offer his perspective?on the value and nature of poetry. Throughout the piece, Coleridge draws?important distinctions between his poetic ideals and Wordsworth?s. One key?facet of Coleridge?s philosophy is his insistence on the necessity of?imagination which is more complex than many reader?s contemporary notions of?the imagination. Additionally, Coleridge establishes his view that good poetry?does not necessarily have to be written in "the language of men," as Wordsworth?suggested. For Coleridge, poetry should use diction that is lofty and more?beautiful than ordinary speech. Since its publication in 1817,?Biographia Literaria has become an?essential document in the study of English Romanticism.?
 

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Contenido

INTRODUCTION
xi
CHAPTER I
143
CHAPTER II
164
CHAPTER III
178
CHAPTER IV
191
CHAPTER V
207
CHAPTER VI
225
CHAPTER VII
231
CHAPTER XIV
364
CHAPTER XV
375
CHAPTER XVI
382
CHAPTER XVII
394
CHAPTER XVIII
410
CHAPTER XIX
434
CHAPTER XX
443
CHAPTER XXI
451

CHAPTER VIII
239
CHAPTER IX
247
CHAPTER X
272
CHAPTER XI
314
CHAPTER XII
322
CHAPTER XIII
356
CHAPTER XXII
460
SATYRANES LETTERS
505
CHAPTER XXIII
555
CHAPTER XXIV
583
BIOGRAPHICAL SUPPLEMENT
599
APPENDIX
691

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Acerca del autor (1834)

Born in Ottery St. Mary, England, in 1772, Samuel Taylor Coleridge studied revolutionary ideas at Cambridge before leaving to enlist in the Dragoons. After his plans to start a communist society in the United States with his friend Robert Southey, later named poet laureate of England, were botched, Coleridge instead turned his attention to teaching and journalism in Bristol. Coleridge married Southey's sister-in-law Sara Fricker, and they moved to Nether Stowey, where they became close friends with William and Dorothy Wordsworth. From this friendship a new poetry emerged, one that focused on Neoclassic artificiality. In later years, their relationship became strained, partly due to Coleridge's moral collapse brought on by opium use, but more importantly because of his rejection of Wordworth's animistic views of nature. In 1809, Coleridge began a weekly paper, The Friend, and settled in London, writing and lecturing. In 1816, he published Kubla Kahn. Coleridge reported that he composed this brief fragment, considered by many to be one of the best poems ever written lyrically and metrically, while under the influence of opium, and that he mentally lost the remainder of the poem when he roused himself to answer an ill-timed knock at his door. Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Christabel, and his sonnet Ozymandias are all respected as inventive and widely influential Romantic pieces. Coleridge's prose works, especially Biographia Literaria, were also broadly read in his day. Coleridge died in 1834.

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