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ONE OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF HIS MAJESTY'S CUSTOMS

IN SCOTLAND;

AND FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY

IN THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW.

WITH AN ACCOUNT OF

HIS LIFE AND WRITINGS

BY DUGALD STEWART, 'ROFESSOR OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY IN THE UNIVERSITY, AND FELLOW OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY, OF EDINBURGH,

&c. &c. &c.

IN FIVE VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

LONDON:

IRINTED FOR T. CADELL AND W. DAVIES; F C. AND J. RIVINGTON; OTRIDGE

AND SON; F WINGRAVE; LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME, AND BROWN; JOHN RICHARDSON ; J. BOOKER; B. CROSBY; E, JEFFERY ; W. STEWART; BLACK, PARRY, AND KINGSBURY ; S. BAGSTER; J. MAWMAN; J. ASPERNE ; AND R. SCHOLEY : AND W. CREECH,

AND

BELL AND BRADFUTE, AT EDİNLURGH.

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Strahan and Preiton, Printers-Street, London.

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IO

CHAP. I. Of SYMPATHY

ibid.
CHAP. II. Of the Pleasure of mutual Sympathy
CHAP. III. Of the manner in which we judge of the
propriety or impropriety of the Affections of other Men,
by their concord or disonance with our own

16
Chap. IV. The same subject continued
CHAP. V. Of the amiable and respectable virtues 30

21

SECT. II.

Of the Degrees of the different Passions which

are consistent with Propriety

36

INTRODUCTION

ibid.
CHAP. I.

Of the Pasions which take their origin
from the body

37
A 2

CHAP. II.
108
INTRODUCTION

CHAP. II. Of those Pasions which take their origin

from a particular turn or habit of the Imagination Page 44
CHAP. III. Of the unfocial Passions

50
Chap. IV. Of the social Pasions

9
CHAP. V. Of the selfish Pasions

62

SECT. III.

Of the Effects of Prosperity and Adversity

upon the Judgment of Mankind with Pre-
gard to the Propriety of Action; and why
it is more casy to obtain their Approbation
in the one state than in the other

69
CHAP. I. That though our sympathy with forrow is

generally a more lively sensation than our sympathy with
joy, it commonly

falls much more flort of the violence of
what is naturally felt by the person principally concerned ibid.
CHAP. II. Of the origin of Ambition, and of the dis-

tinction of Ranks
CHAP. III. Of the corruption of our moral sentiments,

which is cccafioned by this disposition to admire the rich
and the great, and to despise or neglect persons of poor
and mean condition

80

98

PART II.

OF MERIT AND DEMERIT; OR, OF THE OBJECTS

OF REWARD AND PUNISHMENT.

SECT. I.
Of the Sense of Merit and Demerit

ibid.
CHAP. I. That whatever appears to be the proper ob-
ject of gratitude, appears to deserve reward; and that,

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