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ments of animais, putrid vege- which philofophers of other .na. tables, oily, bituminous, and ful- tions do not ascribe to it. No phureous particles, washed from Italian will lie down to sleep where ihe earth by the Miowers. They moonshine can reach him. cut the tender fibres or fingers The Cozze Pelose, or velvet which the fish stretches out, mit- muscle, is first dragged for in the taking them for wholesome food. Great Sea, and then scattered to The wounded parts fester, and breed on sciaie, or heaps of stones poison the whole body. It is an funk by the fishermen at every observation made here, and con- head-land 'of the Mare Piccolo. firmed by long experience, that Under the Piano, or eastern all the tebaceous tribe is fuller, more, are the oyster-beds : no fatter, and more delicate, during coast affords a more exquisite sort. the new and full moon, than in In winter, large hampers of them, the first and last quarters. The are sent over-land to Naples. The difference is accounted for by the season is confined by law to a term tides and currents, which set in between the 25th of November and stronger in the new and full moon, Easter Sunday. and bring with them large quan- . Brundufium was the great fuptities of bruised fishes, insects, plier of oysters for the Roman fruiis, acd other fattening nur- tables. From that port, the spawn ture. I was assured that nothing was carried to stock their public causes fish to spoil sooner than reservoirs at the Lucrene Lake, leaving them expofed to the beams near Baiæ; and no mention is of the moon; and that all pru- made by the antients of the excel. dent fishermen, when out by lence of any Tarantine shell-fishi, night, cover what they catch with except the scallop*. It is therean awning. If they meet with fore not unlikely that oyster spawn any dead fish on the strand, or in has been brought to Taranto from the market, they can always Brindisi, and better preserved than discern, by its colour and flabbiat the original-bed, where the obness, if it be allunato, moon- ftructions in the mouth of the harftruck; and, except in cases of bour have ruined all the fisheriest. great necessity, abstain from it as 'The papyraceous Nautilus is unwholesome. Not having an op- sometimes, but very rarely, seen portunity of verifying this affer. Spreading the wonderful mechanism tion, I give it as doubtful; for I of its fail and oars in the smooth bays know the Italians are apt to attri- of the Mare Grande ; and somebute to the baneful influence of times fishermen Surprise trumpet. the moon many strange effects, mells of a prodigious bulk asleep,

floating

* Pe@tinibus patulis ja&tat fe molle Tarentum.

Hor. Sat. + I received from my friend, F. Ant. Minafi, the following list of shell-fith found in the Tarantine waters. He drew it up, according to the Linnæan Syftem, from a large assortment of specimens, which he was commissioned to class, before they were prefented by the Archbishop of Taranto to the Infant Don Gabriel. Had my learned correspondent had an opportunity of visiting

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floating on the surface of the water Very fine branchy coral is found in a suitry day

:', along the coast, east of the city.

60

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those, seas, it is more than probable that his piercing and experienced eye would have discovered other species, if not genera, of fithes.

i Chiton squamosus et cinereuş". 47 OArca varia... ,2 Lepas balanus

48 Oltrea lima 3 Lepas anarifera

49 Onica radula .. 4 Lepas teftudinaria altera radiis 50 Cvprea talpa 6, et altera s

51 Cyprea lurida 5 Pholas dactylus cum cardine re- 52 Cyprea caput ferpentis

curvato connexoque cartilagine 53 Cyprea pediculus 6 Mya pictorum

Conus monachus
Solen ensis

55 Bulla apperta
Solen legumen

1 56 Bulla Naucus 9 Solen trigilatus

57 Bulla hydatis 10 Tellina anomala

58 Voluta cancellata II Tillina carnaria

59 Voluta glabella Tellina roftrata

Buccinum echinophorum 1 Tellina Punicea

Strombus pes pellicani
Tellina fragilis

Strombus lentiginosus us Tellina planata

63 Murex saxatilis 16 Cardium aculeatum

Murex reticularis 19. Cardiuin cdule

65 Murex costatus Cardium rufticum

Murex curaceus 19 Maĉtra striatula

67 Murex pufio 20 Donax trunculus

68 Murex cornutus 21. Venus læta .

Murex erinaceus
Venus Paphia

70 Murex pileare 23 Venus cally pige

71. Murex iriqueter 24 Venus deflorata

22 Murex fufcatus 25 Spondylus Gæderopus

73 Trochus teffulatus 26 Chama antiquata

Trochus umbilicaris
Arca Nov

75 Turbo cochlus 28 Arca barbara

76 Turbo pullus 29 Anomia ephillium

77 Turbo nodolofus 30 Mvrilus edulis

78 Helix picta
Pinna nobilis

Nerita littoralis
Argonauta Argo

Nerita canræna 33 Buccinum galea

81 Nerita rufa 34 Buccinum maculatum

82, Halioris Midæ 35 Buccinum Tritonis

83 Patella finuata ; Echinus Cidaris

84 Patella lutea 37 Echinus esculentus

85 Patella rustica 38 Echinus laxatilis

86 Pa ella fusca 39 Echinus mamillaris

87 Patella pustula 40 Echinus placenta

88 P tella Græca 41 Serpula anguina

89 Dentalium dentalis 42 Ostrea edulis

90 Dentalium corneum Oltrea Jocobea

91 Serpula arenaria A4 Offrea bullata

92 Serpula vermicularis 45 Offrea pusio

93 Serpula contortuplicata 46 Oltrea sauguinea

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The places are kept a profound quently falls a victim to the wiles fecret. Marks are set up on land, of the Polypus O&topedia. In by which the Tarantines 1teer their very calm weather, this rapacious course, and Gok their hooks and pirate may be seen itealing tocross-beams exactly in the middle wards the yawning mells with a of a coral bed, while ftrangers pebble in his claws, which be must row about a whole day darts to dexterously into the aperdragging, without a guide, or ture, that the Pinna cannot hut certainty of bringing up a lingle itself mp close enough to pinch off twig. There was, a few years the feelers of its antagonist, or save ago, such abundance of coral near its fleil from his ravenous tooth. thele fhores, that a boat's crew The Piona is torn off the rocks was once known to draw up in with hooks, and broken for the one day as much as fold for five fake of its bunch of silk called hundred ducats (931. 155.) Large Lanapeona, which is sold, in its pieces may be had for about five rude State, for about fifteen carducats per rotolo, which at Taranto lini a pound, to women that wash contains only thirteen onces. it well with loap and fresh water.

Under Cape St. Vito, once fa- When it is perfectly cleanied of mous for an abbey of Bafilian all its impurities, they dry it in monks, and in most parts of the the made, Itraighten it with a large Mare Grande, the rocks are comb, cut off the useless roof, and Hudaed with the Pinna Marina. card the remainder; by which This bivalved Niell of the muscle means they reduce a pound of tribe frequently exceeds two feet coarte filaments to about three in length. It faltens it felf to the oices of fine thread. This they fones by its hinge, and throws kvi: into lockings, gloves, caps, out a large tuft of filky threads, and waistcoats'; but they comwhich float and play about to al- monly mix a little folk as a lure small filh; amidit these fila- strengthener. This webis of a beau. ments is generally found, besides tiful yellow brown, resembling the other insedis, a small fhrimp, called burnilhed gold on the back of by the antients, Cancer Piono. some flies and beetles. I was told theres; by the modern Tarantines, that the Lanapenna receives its Caurella. This little crustaceous glois from being steeped in lemonanimal was imagined to be gene- juice, and being afterwards pressed rated with the Pinna, and ap- down with a taylor's goose. pointed by nature to act as a watchman, in apprizing it of the approach of prey or enemies; and Natural History of the Tarantula. that, upon the least alarm, this

From the same. guard ilipt down into the thell, which was instantly closed: but T HE Tarantula is a spider more accurate obfervers have dis. I of the third species of Lincovered, that the poor shrimp is naus's fourth family, with eight no more than a prey itself, and eyes, placed four, two and two ; by no means a centinel for the its colour commonly a very dark muscle, which in its turn fre- grey, but varies according to age

and

and food. The bulk of its fore-part (bought at an apothecary's of the is almost double that of the hind town) was placed in a small Hefhan part; the back of its neck raised crucible, brought by Mr. Rullell, high, and its legs fort and thick. on a flux composed of borax It lives in bare fields, where the (also brought by him) a small lands are fallow, but not very piece of charcoal taken out of i hard ; and, from its antipathy to scuttle (fortuitoudly) by Mr, D. damp and Dade, chooses for its Grote, and examined by the rest residence the rising part of the of the company; and a small piece ground facing the east. Its dwell- of nitre, alto taken out wiihout ing is about tour inches deep, and selection, by the Rev. Mr. Anderhalf an inch wide; at the bottom it fun, from a quantity in common is curved, and there the infeat fits in use, in the laboratory : there bewet weather, and cuts its way out, ing pounded together in a mortar, if water gains upon it. It weaves which all the company had prea nec at the mouth of the hole. viously inspected, were pressed These spiders do not live quite a down into the crucible with a year. In July they lhed their small pestle: on this flux the merSkin, and proceed to propagation, cury was poured by Mr Anderson, which, from a mutual distrust, as and upon it half a grain, carefully they frequently devour one ano- weighed out by Mr. Russell, of a ther, is a work undertaken with certain powder of a dep red cogreat circumspection. They lay Tour, furnished by Dr. P. was put about seven hundred and thirty on it by Mr. Anderfon. eggs, which are hatched in the ' The crucible was then placed in Spring; but the parent does not a fire of a moderate red heat, by live to fee her progeny, having Dr. P. who from his greater faciexpired early in the winter. The lity in inanaging the fire from Ichneumon fly is their most formi- long habit, was thought mort dable enemy.

eligible to conduct the experiment. He repeatedly called the

attention of the company to obAn Account of some Experiments on ferve the stages of the process, and

Mercury and Silver, made at to remark in every part of it that
Guildford, in May 1782, in the any voluntary deception on his
Laboratory of 7. Price, M. D, part was impollible.
F. R. S.

In about a quarter of an hour

from the projection of the powder Experiment 1.

and the placing of the crucible in Made May the 6h, 1782, before the fire, he obierved in the com.

the Rev. Mr. Anderson; Capt. pany, who on infection found his Francis Grose; Mr Rullell and observation true, that the mer. Mr D. Groje; the Gentlemen men- cury, though in a red hot crucible, tioned in the Introduction as shewed no signs of evaporation, the most proper Witnesses of the or even of boiling: the fire was Process, then refidint in Guild- then gradually railed, with alford.

tention on the part of the comT TALF an ounce of mercury, pany, and repeated calls for that 11 provided by Capt. Grote attention from Dr. P. that no un

due

due addition might be made to the examination) was found to be ia matter in the crucible ; in a strong air 9 grains and a quarter, and ja glowing red, or rather wbite- distilled water of remp. Fahren, red, a small dip was taken on the 50 plus, it lost something more point of a clean iron rod, and when than $ (but not quite ao half) of cold, the scorice to taken being a grain : the difference was not knocked oft, were thewn to the appreciable, as no imaller weight company, and found replete with than the eighih of a grain was at Imall globules of a whitish co- hand, but was judged by all the loured metal, which Dr. P. ob. company to be nearly interineferved to them could not be mer- diate; i. e. feven-tenths : - at cury, as being evidently fixed in half a grain the tp. gr. would be tht Itrong heat, but, as he repre- rather more than 18:!; if only sented to them, might be an inter. were lost in water, the fp. gr. would mediate substance between mer- exceed 24:1; the intermediate cury and a more perteet metal. would be 21 and 1- th nearly ;

À 1mall quantity of borax but as the lofs seemed rather more (brought by Mr. R.) was then in- than the intermediate, though appajected by hini, and the fire railed, rently and decidedly less than halfa but with the same precautions on grain, the specifi: gravity must have the part of Dr. P. to subject every been nearly as 20:1: and in this thing to the ninute infpection of eitimate all present acquiefced. the perions present; and after After this hydrotlarical exa. continuing the crucibles in a mination, the globule was fit. ftrong red-white heat for about a tened by percullion into a thin quarter of an hour, it was care. plate and examined by Mr. Rur. fully taken out, and gradually fell, in the manner of arrists for cooled, On breaking ii, a globule commercial purposes. On finding of yellow metal was found at bot. his scrutiny, he deciared it to be tom, and in the scoriæ fmaller as good gold as the grain gold of ones, which, collected and placed the rafiners, and that he would in an accurate balance by Mr. readily purchase ,such gold as that Ruffcl, were found to weigh fully which he had just examined at the ten grains. This metil was in highest price demanded for the the presence of the above-men- pure it gold. tioned gentlemen sealed up in a The plate being then divided, phial, imprelled with the feal of one halt was before the company Mr. Anderfon, to be submitted sealed up by Mr. A, to be fubto future examination, though mitted to a trial of its purity, every one present was perfuaded which Dr. P. proposed, request. that the metal was gold

i ng his friend' Dr. Higgins, of The seal' being broke the next Greek-street, to make; the remorning, in the presence of the maioder being put into aq. regia former company, and of Captain of nit. acid and tal. aminon, at. Austen, and the metal hydrosta: forded a solution fufficienciy rich, tically examined, the weight of before the company to paiated, 10 the larger globule (the others be- yield with fol. of un. a richly coing too minute for this mode of loured crimfor precipitate.

Capt.

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