Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

sessions and presbyteries, preached, to the proper working of the system, &c. addressed Sabbath School children,

&c. &c. met with and counselled Sabbath

3. Qualifications of the Sabbath School

Teacher.-Reasons for regretting that in School teachers; and, wherever a this country all the teachers are young perdoor of entrance was opened to these sons. No one should be invited to this deputies, we know that they were

work but those who have made a public the means of giving a new impulse to posing that every church member is quali

profession of religion. Mistake of supSabbath School agency. The new fied for this work, or that no preparation measure which is now contemplated, necessary. Intellectual qualifications. Rewill be a proper following up of these ligous. General habits

, &c. past arrangements. The lectures are, time-inattention of scholars-ingratitude

4. Discouragements. — Little fruit - no in the first instance, to be delivered of parents-little countenance from the on Sabbath evenings, in the Synod church. Motives and Encouragements.Hall; but we anticipate that arrange- Evils that the Sabbath Schools have the ments will be made for their re

means of preventing or diminishing-posi

tive fruits — conversions — latent seedsdelivery in Glasgow, and other cen

facts-dying testimonies, &c. tral places ; and that, where the 5. Advices.-Care of your motives. Rewhole course cannot conveniently be gularity. Careful preparation. Intercourse given, one or more of the lectures Sabbath School Teachers' Library. Lives

with parents of pupils. Text-books. Helps. will be repeated.

of eminently successful teachers. We subjoin a syllabus of the in- 6. Temptations.-Spiritual pride. Cabals tended course, which only roughly and combinations against the authorities in indicates the train of observation that the church. Mere official piety-weariness

in well-doing, &c. &c. Conclusion. is to be followed, -its design being rather to suggest to the lecturers than Such is the proposed train of illusto control them; and, having presented tration, which we cannot doubt will the plan, we shall take the liberty of interest, not the Sabbath School subjoining one or two remarks :- teachers merely, but sessions, and

all the zealous and intelligent memSyllabus of Lectures on Sabbath Schools, to be delivered by Ministers of the United

bers of our denomination. The first Presbyterian Church.

of the series, we understand, will be 1. Introductory.-- Importance of the Sab- delivered by Dr Young of Perth, bath School. The Congregational Sabbath some time in November. We shall School—its Relation to the Family—to the not, of course, presume to anticipate Pastor-to the Church. The Missionary the lecturers by any observations of Sabbath School-Reasons why it should be kept distinct from the Congregational, at ours; we would merely notice a few least in our cities and larger towns. Some things which we are glad to see in account of the origin and progress of the the syllabus, and to the discussion of Sabbath School in this country-on the con

which we earnestly hope due promitinent- in America—in the United Presbyterian Church, &c. &c.

nence will be given by the lec2. Means of extending the Number and turers :increasing the Efficiency of our Sabbath 1. We are gratified to observe, Schools. There is much yet remaining to

that the distinction is carefully marked be done-Facts which prove this— Work of the Church not done while there remains a

between the congregational and the single uneducated child. The Sabbath missionary Sabbath School. The School should obtain more attention from practical value of this distinction is ministers, sessions, presbyteries, &c. The injurious fallacy must be dispelled, that it great. To intermingle the children is only the work of the young and inex- of our church members with the perienced. Churches should not be satis- children of those that are without, fied with having merely one School, but and to expose the former to all the clusters-Cultivate a district. Trace the evil influences of children whose dehistory of your pupils. Appeal to church members to give themselves to this work. pravity has grown up utterly unImmense importance of the senior class checked, is to incur an imminent

come.

hazard without any compensating ad-fulness of much Sabbath School vantage. In rural districts the pro- agency. The instruction and influportion of such children is not so ence have been withdrawn at the great, and the distinction is of less very moment when most needed. moment; but in our cities, and towns, The pilot has left the helm when he and manufacturing villages, it ought was approaching quicksands, and to be most systematically and scru- when the storm was rising, and the pulously observed. The neglected very crisis of the vessel's destiny had children should be assembled under another roof, or at least at a different 3. There is one other point to which hour of the day, and trained under a we are happy to observe that the atdistinct agency;

tention of the lecturers is specially, But, then, this ought to be done, and at a very early part of the course, and on a large scale; and therefore to be turned; we mean the relation it is that we are pleased with one of the Sabbath School to the pastor clause in the syllabus :-“ Churches and the church. It is time that this should not be satisfied with having were more accurately defined. For merely one school, but clusters; cul- our own part, we think our very tivate a district.” This is the correct presbyterian constitution defines it; view. There must be a generous but a seasonable service will yet be system stretching forth its hands to done by the lecturer who brings out the children of those that are with- the matter clearly. The children of out,” until the whole juvenile popu- the congregation are a part of the lation of a neighbourhood has been pastor's charge, a part of the congreovertaken. Congregations should be gation ; and though it is only in rare ashamed to speak merely of their Sab- instances that he can teach them all bath School. An enlarged benevo- personally, yet should it be distinctly lence will not be satisfied with units. understood that the teachers are to The Sabbath Schools of a congrega- be appointed by him, or by the sestion will thus become a great and sion along with him, and to be subefficient Home Mission ; in them- ject to his superintendence and conselves accomplishing incalculable di- trol. Any other system than this rect good, and certain to drag along introduces an undefined element into with them in due time, and concen- our congregational polity; an element trate on their chosen sphere, every foreign to the very spirit of Presbyother form of Christian agency. terianism, and hostile to congrega

2. We are pleased to see that due tional ord and peace; whose effects, prominence is to be given to the where such an imperium in imperio senior or adult class, as essential to has been borne with for a season, the proper development of the Sab- have repeatedly been most perplexing bath School, not only in the congre- and disastrous. We do not suppose, gation, but in the missionary district. however, that such a system is at Follow the boy into his apprentice- all usual in the United Presbyterian ship, and the girl into her place of ser- Church, vice; keep hold of them ; watch over There are several other things on them, should they be removed from which we might have remarked in your neighbourhood; invite corre- this contemplated scheme of lectures, spondence with them, and never from the delivery of which we augur think your work done until that soul much and permanent advantage. But is saved. Such is the rule we would

we pause; once more reiterating the lay before every teacher; and the appeal we have once and again adneglect of it accounts, to a great ex- dressed to pastors, and sessions, and tent, for the comparative unfruits church members generally, on this

most vital part of our christian development of the church in these agency. Under God, beloved bre- times. They are mistaken. It is thren, you have your permanent and not new machinery that is needed, advancing prosperity in your own but a new spirit, with which to inhands; and, as we have often re- spire and propel the machinery that minded you before, the Sabbath is already in your hands. A system School of the present is the Church of Sabbath Schools commensurate of the future. Many are standing with our numbers, and vigorously and looking up to heaven, as if some wrought, would soon increase our new machinery were needed for the strength and efficiency twenty-fold.

THE CONTINENT.

We have already expressed our opin- many regions; and their statements ion on the importance of the step were strongly confirmed by Professor taken by the Synod at its late meet- La Harpe. A circular to this effect was ing, in its liberal vote of L.500 to the actually sent forth to all the EvangelEvangelical Society of Geneva, in aid ists, and the following interesting exof the evangelization of France. Most tract showsits effect in one instance: seasonable in itself, both on account In consequence of want of funds, of the new era of religious liberty we were compelled about the end of and inquiry on which we believe March to take the resolution of disthat great nation to have entered, solving our connexion with all our and on account of the temporary pe agents (Evangelists or Colporteurs), cuniary embarrassment which a revo- for the maintenance of whom we had lution necessarily brought upon the no special funds, received or promised. various benevolent societies; we trust Wedecided to send a circular to all our that that vote is the precursor of a agents, to inform them of the state of permanent agency, and will open the the society, even to the very few we way to closer alliance, and more re- might hope to maintain, adding to gular and extensive intercourse with these a postscript, to explain that they the continental churches,

were exempted from this measure, We are confirmed in these impress and for what reason. sions by the contents of certain docu- “This circular was lithographed, ments that have been put into our and occupied three pages, at the end hands by an esteemed friend and of which was my signature; the postbenefactor of the suffering brethren script was on the fourth page of the on the continent, and feel that we sheet. M. Vautier received this paper, are bestowing a favour upon our like all others, and reading attentivereaders in presenting them with a ly with his wife as far as my signafew extracts.

ture without turning over the leaf, It will be recollected that the Com- believed that he also was dismissed. mittee on Foreign Correspondence His sorrow was great; they passed the strongly represented to the Synod, night almost without sleep, but much that unless immediate and liberal aid in prayer, being chiefly afflicted by were extended to the Geneva Society, the distress of our society, and the they would be constrained to with- idea that the holy work of evangelidraw the greater number of their zation in France would be altogether Evangelists from the French terri- abandoned, in a moment when it was tories, and literally to put out the only more needed than ever. gospel light that was shining in so “They thoughtover various plans in order to gain in some manner their necessary to give the friends time to livelihood, without completely giving come back from their work and take up the work they had undertaken some food; their habitations are also with so much zeal and devotedness. often not contiguous, but disseminated The next morning M. Vautier rose over a large space, and time is reearly in order to read the circular quired to gather together a certain again, with the hope of finding con- number of hearers. At other times solation in the parts of it which ex- we are obliged to meet at twelve pressed the affection of our Committee o'clock, after their mid-day meal, for our labourers, and the desire he and during their time of rest. In expressed of resuming at some future general women come in greater numperiod (if it pleased God) our con- ber than men ; yet in many places the nexion with them; when, in taking male hearers are numerous and reguup the paper, he read to his astonish- lar in their attendance. ment the lines added on the fourth “ Our largest meetings are those page, informing him that the sad of Beaumont, frequented by 200 or measure did not concern his mission, 300 persons, and sometimes many a generous friend in Scotland having more; amongst them are many Rogiven us the means of continuing him man Catholics, and our friends do all at Valence. Great was his joy and they can to induce them to come. surprise, and his first action was to This zeal to bring others within reach kneel down with his excellent wife of the joyous sound of the gospel, is in praise and thanksgiving to God, not confined to Protestants alone; with which, amidst tears of joy and two Romish families living in a subgratitude, were mingled fervent prayers urb of Valence, who, although they for their unknown benefactor. May have not yet outwardly abandoned the love of God,' says he, 'l'est abun- catholicism, are regular hearers at dantly upon this christian brother, our meetings, show the same ardour and may he increase to him the means in bringing their acquaintances there of multiplying and extending to others also. Others, especially females, are his works of christian charity !” constantly watching an opportunity • We introduce our next extract, of introducing us into the families both with the view of giving our who still entertain prejudices against readers an idea of the labours of a the Evangelists, and they inform 'us French Evangelist, and of illustrat- whenever sorrow or sickness has ening the intuitive readiness with which tered one of them, and thus opened a a mind that has itself found "peace way for the preacher of the gospel. in believing,” hastens to bring others Yet it must not be supposed that all into the same happy circumstances:- those who frequent our meetings are

“On Sunday,” says M. V., “I converted ; for even among the chrishave three services in our little cha- tians many are still very weak, and pel; in the morning a Sunday school, their walk is full of frailties and difat two o'clock a sermon, and in the ficulties, yet they lead an honest life evening a more familiar kind of before the world. Besides the regumeeting, which is well attended. lar meetings at stated times, we have During the week I hold meetings in a great many occasional ones; where seven or eight other villages, and I go to visit some of our friends, could find ready access in many others, they frequently collect their neighif my time allowed me to visit them bours in their room, in order that in a regular manner. In the long they may all together profit by the days and hard-working seasons, our reading and expounding of the scripmeetings take place at a late hour tures, and join in prayer. In this (nine o'clock in the evening), as it is part of France women never preacli

or explain the word of God, but they Valence. When Monnier heard of frequently pray aloud in family wor- the embarrassment of our society, he ship and small familiar meetings, and found means of placing himself in a the spirit of prayer is remarkable in silk manufactory, in which he emniany of them.

ployed one half of his time, whilst “ If in this country there is a the other was given to our society, revival, it does not show itself and thus receiving but half his forby any noise or outward signs. mer salary: later, hearing of our Polemic is avoided by us. Did growing distress,'and of the necessity we seek controversy, attack in a in which we found ourselves of senddirect manner and openly the errors ing away so many labourers, he gave of popery, we should readily gather all his time to the manufactory, and hearers around us; but it is chiefly reserved only the Sundays, which he by establishing the truth as it is in employs in evangelization without Christ, that we undermine the for- salary on our part. This good and tresses of bigotry and superstition. modest man has lately visited some No great change is visible for the pre- parts of the field where he had forsent, but light is gradually diffused merly been employed, and was much amidst the dark places, and will in afflicted at the progress made by the time dispel Romish obscurity.” doctrines of the Plymouth brethren ;

The following brief passage will be found there a new pamphlet by fitly close our extracts, and remind Mr Darby, in which he surpassed ail our readers of the spirit of Paul the his former assertions. According to tent-maker :

him, it is no longer the church of 66 We have had hitherto three evan- our days alone which has apostatized, gelists at Valence, it being a very im- but the apostles themselves, or at portant centre, but now M. Vautier least the greater number of them ! is alone ; one of those we formerly For my part, I do not regret his: employed, a colporteur of the name publishing such absurdities, as it is: of Monnier, is so well gifted, that he the surest way of opening the eyes of was chosen as preacher of a church many sincere believers who have for three months, whose minister died been misled by him, and who will some time since. This church is in recoil from following him in the logi. the mountains, several leagues from cal consequences of his system,”

RESURRECTION OF OLD CALUMNIES AGAINST DISSENTERS ON THE

PART OF JAMES A. HALDANE, ESQ.

SOME years ago, the pastor of a Baptist -very feeble and incoherent-and, church in Edinburgh, feeling aggriev- as an argument against voluntaryism, ed at some references to himself and his might have been safely left to perish published sentiments which Dr Brown in its contemptible insignificance. had made in his book on “ Tribute,” But it did not confine itself to the issued a letter with the following theme announced on its title-page. It title :-" The Voluntary Question compassed “sea and land” in its Political, not Religious. A Letter to eagerness and vanity. The author's the Rev. Dr John Brown, occasioned own denominational peculiarities are by the allusion in his recent Work to dragged with little tact or purpose the Author's sentiments upon Na- into the fray ; though certainly the tional Churches. By J. A. Haldane.” publication was weak and watery The production is certainly a silly one enough without being plunged into

« AnteriorContinuar »