Nugae Litterariae: Or, Brief Essays on Literary, Social, and Other Themes

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Sampson Low, Marston & Company, 1896 - 344 páginas

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Página 223 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Página 138 - My Lord of Ely, when I was last in Holborn, I saw good strawberries in your garden there : I do beseech you send for some of them.
Página 148 - I do the very best I know how — the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what is said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference.
Página 233 - For perhaps they have heard some talk, such an one is a great rich man, and another except to it, yea, but he hath a great charge of children; as if it were an abatement to his riches. But the most ordinary cause of a single life is liberty, especially in certain self-pleasing and...
Página 292 - ... and better breakfasted than he whose morning appetite would have gladly fed on green figs between Bethany and Jerusalem, his religion walks abroad at eight, and leaves his kind entertainer in the shop trading all day without his religion.
Página 49 - Thinking leads man to knowledge. He may see and hear, and read and learn whatever he pleases, and as much as he pleases ; he will never know anything of it, except that which he has thought over, that which by thinking he has made the property of his own mind. Is it then saying too much if I say that man, by thinking only, becomes truly man? Take away thought from man's life, and what remains ?— festtdozzi.
Página 186 - The diligent hand maketh rich ;" and it is true indeed : but he considers not that it is not in the power of riches to make a man happy, for it was wisely said by a man of great observation, " that there be as many miseries beyond riches as on this side of them.
Página 142 - With yielding hand, That feels him still, yet to his furious course Gives way, you, now retiring, following now Across the stream, exhaust his idle rage; Till floating broad upon his breathless side, And to his fate abandon'd, to the shore You gaily drag your unresisting prize.
Página 202 - If you your lips would keep from slips, Five things observe with care: Of whom you speak, to whom you speak, And how and when and where.
Página 37 - And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things.

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