Romance, Poetry, and Surgical Sleep: Literature Influences Medicine

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - 162 páginas

Pain and suffering, once associated with punishment for sin, became regarded as a purposeless evil that was hostile to human welfare. The works of Thomas Beddoes, Coleridge, and Shelley embody the change in attitude toward suffering and lay the groundwork for the general use of anesthesia in modern medicine. Papper contends that there was no real societal readiness to treat or prevent pain until the idea of the worth of the common man or woman was established by the upheaval of the French Revolution. The humanitarian concepts that we take for granted were relatively recent developments in Western society and were associated with the recognition of the importance of the individual.

 

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Contenido

An Ansthesiologists Attempts to Understand Pain and Suffering as a MedicalLiterary Conglomerate
1
The Discovery of AnesthesiaAn Outgrowth of an Understanding About the Prevention of Pain and Suffering
27
Thomas Beddoes Sr Physician and Philosopher
37
The Importance of Bristol as a Site for the Pneumatic Institute Beddoes and Bristol
49
The Recruitment of Scientists Writers and Experimenters for the Pneumatic Institute
63
Samuel Taylor Coleridge Pain and Suffering as Experience
75
Percy Bysshe Shelley
109
Commentary and Summary
131
Epilogue
137
Supplementary Reading
147
Index
157
About the Author
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E. M. PAPPER is Professor of Anesthesiology and Pharmacology at the University of Miami School of Medicine where he was Dean of the Faculty of Medicine until 1981. He is the author of hundreds of publications and is one of the legends of American anesthesiology.

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