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PAGE

The Avon, a Feeder of the Annan

512

Suggested by a View from an Eminence in Inglewood Forest

• 512

Hart's-horn Tree, near Penrith .

512

Countess's Pillar

512

Roman Antiquities. (From the Roman Station at Old Penrith)

• 513

Apology for the foregoing

513

The Highland Broach

513

The Egyptian Maid ; or, the Romance of the Water Lily

514

Ode, composed on May Morning

519

To May

· 520

Inscription

521

Elegiac Musings in the Grounds of Coleorton Hall, the Seat of the late Sir

George Beaumont, Bart.

521

Epitaph

522

Inscription intended for a Stone in the Grounds of Rydal Mount

522

Written in an Album

522

Incident at Bruges.

522

A Jewish Family. (In a small valley opposite St. Goar, upon the Rhine)

523

Devotional Incitements

523

The Armenian Lady's Love

524

The Primrose of the Rock

526

Presentiments

527

Sonnets :

The Poet and the caged Turtledove .

Chatsworth ! thy stately Mansion

Desponding Father! mar this al Bough

Roman Antiquities discovered at Bishopstone, Herefordsbire

St. Catherine of Ledbury.

529

The Russian Fugitive

529

Sonnets :-

Why art thou silent

• 533

Four fiery Steeds impatient of the Rein

533

To the Author's Portrait

534

Gold and Silver Fishes, in a Vase

534

Liberty. (Sequel to the above)

534

Evening Voluntaries :-

Calm is the fragrant Air, and loth to lose .

536

Not in the lucid Intervals of Life

· 537

By the Side of Rydal Mere

537

Soft as a Cloud in yon blue Ridge

538
The Leaves that rustled on this Oak-crowned Hill
The Sun, that seemed so mildly to retire .

539
By the Sea-side.

539

The Labourer's Noon-day Hymn

540

A Wren's Nest .

540

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Sonnets composed during a Tour in Scotland in 1833

541

Adieu ! Rydalian Laurels ! that have grown

541

Why should the Enthusiast, journeying through this Isle .

541

They called Thee merry England, in old Time.

541

To the River Greta, near Keswick

541

To the River Derwent

542

In Sight of the Town of Cockermouth

542

Address from the Spirit of Cocke: South Castle

542

Nun's Well, Brigham

542

To a Friend (on the Banks of the Derwent)

543

Mary Queen of Scots (landing at the Mouth of the Derwent, Workington) 543

In the Channel, between the Coast of Cumberland and the Isle of Man 543

At Sea off the Isle of Man .

543

Desire we past Illusions to recall?

544

On entering Douglas Bay, Isle of Man

544

By the Sea-shore, Isle of Man

544

Isle of Man

544

The Retired Marine Officer, Isle of Man

544

By a Retired Mariner (a Friend of the Author)

545

At Bala-sala, Isle of Man. (Supposed to be written by a Friend)

545

Tynwald Hill

· 545

Despond who will—I heard a voice exclaim

545

In the Frith of Clyde, Ailsa Crag. (July 17, 1833)

546

On the Frith of Clyde. (In a Steam-boat).

546

On revisiting Dunolly Castle

· 546

The Dunolly Eagle

• 546

Cave of Staffa

547

Cave of Staffa

547

Cave of Staffa

547

Flowers on the Top of the Pillars at the Entrance of the Cave

547

On to Iona! What can she afford

547

Iona. (Upon landing)

548

The Black Stones of lona

Homeward we turn. Isle of Columba's Cell

Greenock .

" There !" said a Stripling, pointing with meet Pride .

548

Fancy and Tradition

· 549

The River Eden, Cumberland

· 549

Monument of Mrs. Howard (by Nollekens) in Wetheral Church, near Corby 549

Tranquillity! the sovereign aim wert thou .

· 549

Nunnery

• 550

Steam-boats, Viaducts, and Railways

• 550

Lowther ! in thy majestic Pile are seen

· 550

To the Earl of Lonsdale

550

To Cordelia M-Hallsteads, Ullswater

• 551

Conclusion.

• 551

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MEMOIR.

ILLIAM WORDSWORTH, the most distinguished philosophical poet

that England has produced, was born at Cockermouth, in Cumber

land, on the 7th of April, 1770. The family of Wordsworth appears to have been of some little antiquity, as members of it are found settled at Pennistone, near Doncaster, so far back as the reign of Edward III., and the poet himself had in his possession an antique oak chest, or almery, of the reign of Henry VIII. (1525), on which was recorded, in curious carving, some generations of the family pedigree. But the branch from which he sprang was originally planted at Falthwaite, near Stainborough, and removed thence to Sockbridge, in Westmoreland, about the beginning of the last century.

The poet's father, who is said to have been a man of vigorous mental powers and of some eloquence, was an attorney, and held the appointment of law-agent to the Earl of Lonsdale. Ann Cookson, the poet's mother, was the daughter of a mercer of Penrith, and was descended, on her mother's side, from a very ancient familythe Crackanthorpes—who had been seated at Newbiggen Hall, in Westmoreland, for more than five hundred years. She appears to have been a woman of gentle and affectionate disposition, of much wisdom, high moral principle, and unaffected piety. She died when the poet was in his eighth year ; so that, like Cowper, he had hardly listened to the language of maternal love when it was lost to him for ever. Henceforth he was confided to the care of strangers. But the impressions left upon his mind by his mother's tender treatment, and by the liberal and enlarged, yet gentle and confiding spirit in which she conducted the moral and mental training of his childhood, appear to have been deep and abiding, for he has embodied them in one or two passages of his poems, in lines as full of truthful feeling and tender pathos as any in the language.

The family consisted of five children-four sons and one daughter. The eldest son became an attorney and died in 1816; the third went to sea, became commander of the Earl of Abergavenny, East Indiaman, and perished by shipwreck off Wymouth in 1805. The youngest, Christopher, entered the Church, and became well known as Dr. Wordsworth, * author of a work entitled “Ecclesiastical

• Two of Dr. Wordsworth's sons have become somewhat distinguished. One of themChristopher Wordsworth, D.D.-—is the present able and learned Bishop of Lincoln, the writer of

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