The art of reading, or, Rules for the attainment of a just and correct enunciation of written language: mostly selected from Walker's Elements of elocution, and adapted to the use of schools

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Cummings, Hilliard, and Company, 1826 - 68 páginas
 

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Página 33 - Look on her face, and you'll forget 'em all. This nymph, to the destruction of mankind, Nourished two locks which graceful hung behind In equal curls, and well conspired to deck With shining ringlets the smooth, ivory neck. Love in these labyrinths his slaves detains, And mighty hearts are held in slender chains. With hairy springes we the birds betray, Slight lines of hair surprise the finny prey, Fair tresses man's imperial race ensnare, And beauty draws us with a single hair.
Página 67 - While from the bounded level of our mind, Short views we take, nor see the lengths behind; But more advanc'd, behold with strange surprise New distant scenes of endless science rise!
Página 64 - Ten Censure wrong for one who Writes amiss ; A Fool might once himself alone expose, Now One in Verse makes many more in Prose. 'Tis with our Judgments as our Watches, none Go just alike, yet each believes his own.
Página 41 - But can we believe a thinking being, that is in a perpetual progress of improvements, and travelling on from perfection to perfection, after having just looked abroad into the works of its Creator, and made a few discoveries of his infinite goodness, wisdom, and power, must perish at her first setting out, and in the very beginning of her inquiries ? A man, considered in his present state, seems only sent into the world to propagate his kind.
Página 64 - Unfastens : on a sudden open fly With impetuous recoil and jarring sound The infernal doors, and on their hinges grate Harsh thunder, that the lowest bottom shook Of Erebus.
Página 62 - Of all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.
Página 66 - One science only will one genius fit ; So vast is art, so narrow human wit : Not only bounded to peculiar arts, But oft in those confined to single parts.
Página 33 - Our sons their fathers' failing language see, And such as Chaucer is, shall Dryden be. So when the faithful pencil has design'd Some bright idea of the master's mind, Where a new world leaps out at his command, And ready nature waits upon his hand ; When the ripe colours soften and unite, And sweetly melt into just shade and light ; When mellowing years their full perfection give, 490 And each bold figure just begins to live, The treacherous colours the fair art betray, And. all the bright creation...
Página 61 - Tis ours to trace him only in our own. He, who through vast immensity can pierce, See worlds on worlds compose one universe, Observe how system into system runs, What other planets circle other suns, What varied being peoples every star, May tell why Heaven has made us as we are.
Página 67 - And taught the dreadful battle where to rage. — So when an Angel by Divine command With rising tempests shakes a guilty land — Such as of late o'er pale Britannia past — Calm and serene he drives the furious blast ; And pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.

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