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Bring me a new and blooming wreath!
O let it all it's freshness breathe !
Fan me, ye winds from coldest sky,
Colder and colder, or I die !

Thou art deceiv'd, ah wretched swain !
The aid thou ask'st is all in vain.
Nor wine, nor flow'rs, nor' freshest gale
To cool love's fever ought avail :
Nor ever hope relief to find,
Till Lucy pleases to be kind.

Addition to the Note in p. xix. of the

Memoir.

MR. WALKER was always much devoted to the practice of the mechanic arts; and the manual occupations of the lathe and the chisel continued during the greatest part of his life to furnish an agreeable occupation to his leisure hours. In this, as in every thing to which he applied himself, he exhibited proofs of uncommon excellence : his work was much admired for it's truth and accuracy; his filing was so remarkable, that in point of flatness it was equal to grinding, in the technical language of the trade it was what is expressed by filing hollow. He betrayed also considerable powers of invention: he constructed a chuck upon an entire new principle. His ingenuity was also apparent in a very curious machine for drilling holes. perfectly perpendicular to the plate, which was but a secondary invention for the pur

pose

pose of accomplishing his plan of wheels and pinions with loose rollers to avoid friction, a principle which he afterward applied to a clock, that he constructed with his own hands. In the latter part of his life he had also invented a very curious machine for drawing all the conic sections, which, though he did not live to finish it, yet showed the highest degree of inventive mechanical genius, in combination with his mathemati.

cal powers.

It

may not be improper to notice also the excellence of his drawing, as an additional proof of the great versatility of his talents. He had early in life been at very considerable expense and trouble in collecting the engravings of the Italian and other artists: some of the most admired specimens of these he afterward employed himself in copying for his friends; the extreme accuracy with which they were traced was surprising : there was also a freedom and boldness in his hatches, which preserved all the spirit of the original. “It is difficult to speak in

adequate

adequate terms of the excellence to which he attained in the various objects to which he directed his attention, without appearing to use the language of exaggeration.

AN

ADDRESS

TO THE

BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS.

[Referred to in page xcii of the Memoir.]

At the height of national calamity we ap-
proach a British house of commons, with
that respect which is due to the chosen
guardians of our rights, and with that hope
which we cannot suffer ourselves to despair
of from those, whom we have appointed to
so great a trust. The growing and almost
insupportable distresses of this injured and
degraded country summon us into your
presence; you have a right to know the
sense we have of those distresses, and to find
in the wishes of the people the best encou-
ragement for your immediate and magnani-
mous exertions for the rescue of your coun-

try.

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