The Works of Richard Hurd, Lord Bishop of Worcester: Moral and political dialogues

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, Strand, 1811
 

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Página 290 - Such notes as, warbled to the string, Drew Iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what Love did seek. Or call up him that left half told The story of Cambuscan bold, Of Camball, and of Algarsife, And who had Canace to wife, That owned the virtuous Ring and Glass, And of the wondrous Horse of Brass, On which the Tartar King did ride...
Página 289 - Where throngs of knights and barons bold, In weeds of peace, high triumphs hold, With store of ladies, whose bright eyes Rain influence, and judge the prize Of wit or arms, while both contend To win her grace whom all commend.
Página 292 - When an architect examines a Gothic structure by Grecian rules, he finds nothing but deformity. But the Gothic architecture has its own rules, by which when it comes to be examined, it is seen to have its merit, as well as the Grecian.
Página 314 - The fairest of her sex Angelica His daughter, sought by many pro.west knights, Both Paynim, and the peers of Charlemain.
Página 346 - What we have gotten by this revolution, you will say, is a great deal of good sense. What we have lost is a world of fine fabling; the illusion of which is so grateful to the charmed spirit that in spite of philosophy and fashion.
Página 265 - Cum bellum civitas aut illatum defendit aut infert, magistratus qui ei bello praesint, ut vitae necisque habeant potestatem deliguntur. In pace nullus est communis magistratus, sed principes regionum atque pagorum inter suos jus dicunt, controversiasque minuunt.
Página 302 - Thus, though inferior to each in his own specific virtue, he is superior to all by uniting the whole circle of their virtues in himself. And thus he arrives, at length, at the possession of that bright form of Glory, whose ravishing beauty, as seen in a dream or vision, had led him out into these miraculous adventures in the land of Fairy.
Página 36 - That as to dispute what God may do is blasphemy, ... so is it sedition in subjects to dispute what a king may do in the height of his power.
Página 67 - And as ye see it manifest that the King is overlord of the whole land, so is he master over every person that inhabiteth the same, having power over the life and death of every one of them. For although a just prince will not take the life of any of his subjects without a clear law, yet the same laws whereby he taketh them are made by himself or his predecessors, and so the power flows always from himself...
Página 342 - For it is to be observed, that the idolizers of these romances did by them, what the votaries of HOMER had done by him. As the times improved and would less bear his strange tales, they moralized what they could, and turned the rest into mysteries of natural science.

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