Modern Culture: Its True Aims and Requirements; a Series of Addresses and Arguments on the Claims of Scientific Education

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Edward Livingston Youmans
Macmillan and Company, 1867 - 423 páginas
 

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Página 4 - Onward and on, the eternal Pan Who layeth the world's incessant plan, Halteth never in one shape, But forever doth escape, Like wave or flame, into new forms Of gem, and air, of plants, and worms.
Página 325 - I keep the subject constantly before me, and wait till the first dawnings open slowly by little and little into a full and clear light.
Página 293 - ... if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other...
Página 318 - On earth there is nothing great but man, In man there is nothing great but mind.
Página 88 - The proper arrangement, for example, of a code of laws, depends on the same scientific conditions as the classifications in natural history ; nor could there be a better preparatory discipline for that important function than the study of the principles of a natural arrangement, not only in the abstract, but in their actual application to the class of phenomena for which they were first elaborated, and which are still the best school for le'arning their use.
Página 214 - The world little knows how many of the thoughts and theories which have passed through the mind of a scientific investigator have been crushed in silence and secrecy by his own severe criticism and adverse examination ; that in the most successful instances not a tenth of the suggestions, the hopes, the wishes, the preliminary conclusions have been realized.
Página 393 - Modern writers have been prevented by many causes from supplying the deficiencies of their classical predecessors. At the time of the revival of literature, no man could, without great and painful labour, acquire an accurate and elegant knowledge of the ancient languages.
Página 387 - No human pursuits make any material progress until science is brought to bear upon them. We have seen, accordingly, many of them slumber for centuries upon centuries; but, from the moment that science has touched them with her magic wand, they have sprung forward, and taken strides which amaze and almost awe the beholder. Look at the transformation which has gone...
Página 259 - They know not how to spend their time (disports excepted, which are all their business), what to do, or otherwise how to bestow themselves ; like our modern Frenchmen, that had rather lose a pound of blood in a single combat, than a drop of sweat in any honest labour.
Página 297 - He roved among the vales and streams, In the green wood and hollow dell ; They were his dwellings night and day, — But Nature ne'er could find the way Into the heart of Peter Bell. In vain, through every changeful year, Did Nature lead him as before ; A primrose by a river's brim A yellow primrose was to him, And it was nothing more.

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