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· They ascended all at once, like a flock of beautiful swans, that taking flight raise themselves with majes. tic rapidity over the tops of our highest palaces. I gazed with sadness; my eye followed them in the air, until their venerable heads were lost in the silver clouds, and I remained alone on this magnificent deserted land.

I perceived I was not yet fitted to dwell in it, and wished to return to this unfortunate world of expiation : thus the animal escaped from his keeper returns, following the track of his chain, with a mild aspect, and enters his prison. Awaking, the illusion was dispelled, which it is beyond the power of my weak tongue or pen to de scribe in its full splendor : but this illusion I shall for ever cherish; and, supported by the foundation of hope, I will preserve it until death in the inmost recesses of my soul.

LE CHEVALIER BAYARD.: · The continence and generosity of the Chevalier sans peur et sans reproche have been immortalized in « the Spectator :" and what history of his time has not celebrated his courage ? . · Being asked, one day, what was the best legacy which à father could leave to his children, he replied, “ Lao vertu et la sagesse, qui ne craignent ni pluie, ni vent, ni tempeste, ni force d'homme-Valour and virtue, which fear neither rain, nor storni, nor tempest, nor the strength of man. Valour and virtue à toute epreuve.• Francis the First was desirous to be created a Knight by Bayard, the evening before the battle of Marignan, Bayard made his excuses, as not being worthy of that honour. Francis insisted, and Bayard, having given him the accolade with his sword, exclaimed, “ Sire, I hope the ceremony performed by me will prevail as much as if it had been performed by Roland.” Then, apostrophizing his sword before he returned it into the scabbard, he said, “ From this time, my good sword, you will be regarded as preciously as if you were a relic."

In the war carried on by Julius the Second against the Duke of Ferrara and the French, the Duke agreed with Grendo, an Italian, to poison Julius. Bayard, hearing of this, remonstrated in the strongest terms with the Duke against this atrocious action, The Duke en

deavoured to excuse it, by saying, that Julius had once hired some one to assassinate him. “Alas! my lord,” replied Bayard, “ let us never do that which we condemn as a crime in others. Give me up that scoundrel Grendo, and I will either hang him immediately, or send him to the Pope in irons."

It being once proposed to him to enter into the service of the King of England, he answered, “I have already two masters-God and my Prince ; I will never serve any other.”

At the siege of Mezieres, which town he defended, the Comte de Nassau summoned him to surrender it. “ Nay,” replied he, “ if I must march out of the place, it shall be over a bridge of the dead bodies of the enemy."

At the defeat of Romagnano, when Bonivet, wounded and not able to serve any longer, gave him up the command of the army, he said, " It is rather late, perhaps'; but a man should serve his country at the risk of losing that life which he owes to it.” Bayard, as usual, performed prodigies of valour, but was wounded by a shot froin a musket, which broke some of the vertebræ of his back. He then caused himself to be helped off his horse, and to be placed at the foot of a tree; “that at least,” said he, “my face be looking toward the enemy.” The celebrated Constable of Bourbon coming up to him, said, “ Alas, M. Bayard, how shocked and confounded I am, to see you in this situation ! I have always loved and honoured you for the great valour and virtue which you have always possessed.” Bayard, making an effort to recover some strength, leaned forward toward the Constable, and said, in a firm tone of voice, “ For God's sake, my lord, do not have any pity for me, but rather keep it for yourself, who are fighting against your allegiance and your sovereign, while I am dying for my sovereign and my allegiance," i ,

It was said of Bayard by the military men of his time, that he assaulted like a greyhound, defended himself like a lion, and retreated like a wolf, who always retires from his pursuers with his face toward thein, His device was a porcupine, with this motto :

Vires agminis unus habet.

One man possesses the power of a whole troop. This was given him in consequence of his having singly defended a bridge against two hundred Spaniards.

HENRY THE SECOND. This Prince, though of a very easy and accommodating disposition, knew when it was proper to give a refusal. His favourite sister, married to the Duke of Savoy, was very earnest with him to render to her husband the strong fortresses of Pignerol, Tarillon, and Perouse, .which may be looked upon as the keys of France toward Italy. He told the Ambassadors from Savoy, who intimated his sister's desire to him, “ I am extremely fond " of my sister, but I would much sooner give her my “ two eyes out of my head than these three fortresses." • Henry was killed at a tournament; and when Catherine of Medicis sent to his mistress, Diana de Poitiers, for the crown jewels, with which he had presented her, she * returned them, and told the messenger, “ Alas! I have

now no master; “ and I wish my enemies to know, that .“ though the Prince is dead, I am not afraid of them; .6 and if I have the misfortune to survive my Sovereign

“ any time, my heart will be too much affected with * “ grief at losing him, to feel in the least degree the *" uneasiness and the indignities which they will endea"vour to put upon me.”

MARESCHAL STROZZI. .. · His son coming one day to wish him good morning, he said to him, “ Young man, what have you been doing this morning ?” — Sir," replied his son, “ I have been to the manege, I have played at tennis, and I have · breakfasted." os Blockhead !” said the Marshal, “never · satisfy the wants of the body before those of the soul.

Pray let that never happen again. Before you do any thing else, feed your mind with the perusal of some good book, or pursue some study or other, and then do afterwards with your body what you please.” . According to Brotier, Strozzi was continually reading

the history, of some of the military expeditions of antiquity; and said, that they were of equal use to him with the practice and exercise of the military art.

REVIEW OF BOOKS.

PROBATQUE CULPATQUE.

Collections for the History of the Town and Soke of Grant

ham; containing authentic Memoirs of Sir Isaac Nero. ton, now first published, from the original MSS. in the Possession of the Earl of Portsmouth. By Edmund T'urnor, F.R.S. F.A.S. 410. 11. 85. Miller.

As a topographical work this volume has many claims to praise, the ingenious author having availed hiinself of every authority, written, oral, and traditionary, to make it in all respects complete; but the book is chiefly valu. able on account of the authentic particulars it records of the life of our illustrious countryman, Sir Isaac Newton, of whose private history and conduct so little has hitherto been known. The valuable MSS. which have afforda ed these memoranda came into the possession of the Eart of Portsmouth from his lordship’s grandmother, Cathe. rine Viscountess Lymington, daughter and sole heiress of John Conduitt, Esq. by Catherine Barton, niece of Sir Isaac Newton. This lady, educated at Sir Isaac's expense, and who lived with him near twenty years, before and after her marriage with Mr. Conduitt, was celebrated for her wit and beauty; and was much noticed for her engaging manners by the Earl of Halifax, who made her a considerable bequest at his death.

It is curious to observe from what trifling accidents the most important occurrences sometimes arise ; but for the following rather ludicrous circumstance, it is not improbable that Newton might have remained a dunce all his life, and the world have lost its most enlightened philosopher.

“ Sir Isaac used to relate that he was very negligent at school, and very low in it, till the boy above him gave him a kick in the belly, which put him to a great deal of pain. Not content with having thrashed his adversary, Sir Isaac could not rest till he had got before him in the school, and from that time he continued rising till he was the head-boy."

As every thing connected with the name of this wone HENRY THE SECOND. This Prince, though of a very easy and accommodating disposition, knew when it was proper to give a refusal. His favourite sister, married to the Duke of Savoy, was very earnest with him to render to her husband the strong fortresses of Pignerol, Tarillon, and Perouse, which may be looked upon as the keys of France toward Italy. He told the Ambassadors from Savoy, who intimated his sister's desire to him, “ I am extremely fond “ of my sister, but I would much sooner give her my 6 two eyes out of my head than these three fortresses." • Henry was killed at a tournament; and when Catherine of Medicis sent to his mistress, Diana de Poitiers, for

the crown jewels, with which he had presented her, she * returned them, and told the messenger, “ Alas! I have now no master; “ and I wish my enemies to know, that “ though the Prince is dead, I am not afraid of them; .66 and if I have the misfortune to survive my Sovereign

“ any time, my heart will be too much affected with * " grief at losing him, to feel in the least degree the *“ uneasiness and the indigoities which they will endea. “ vour to put upon me.”

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MARESCHAL STROZZI. : · His son coming one day to wish him good morning,

he said to him, “ Young man, what have you been doing this morning ?”— Sir,” replied his son, “ I have been to the manege, I have played at tennis, and I have · breakfasted.” 6. Blockhead!” said the Marshal, “never · satisfy the wants of the body before those of the soul.

Pray let that never happen again. Before you do any thing else, feed your mind with the perusal of some good book, or pursue some study or other, and then do afterwards with your body what you please.”

According to Brotier, Strozzi was continually reading the history of some of the military expeditions of antiquity; and said, that they were of equal use to him with the practice and exercise of the military art.

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