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northern pole.

1. 234.

1. 97. . . . . . . . . Tartarian stream.
1. 99.
1. 108.

And avici in

And quick Law, with her scrupulous head. 1. 117. And on the yellow sands. 1. 133. And makes a blot of nature. [And throws a blot o'er all

the air.]
Stay thy polisht ebon chair
Wherein thou rid'st with Hecate,

And favour our close jocondrie. 1.144 sqq. With a light and frolic round.

The MEASURE, in a wild, rude, and wanton antic.
Break off, break off, I hear a different pace
Of some chaste footing near about this ground
Some virgin sure benighted in these woods.
Run to your shrouds within these brake and trees
Our number may affright.

They all scatter.

Now to my trains And to my mother's charms . . . . . 11. 154, 155. My powder'd spells unto the spungy air

of power to cheat the eye with sleight [blind) illusion. 1. 164.

And hug him into nets . . . . . . . 1. 181. In the blind alleys of this arched wood 11. 193-195. They had engaged their youthly steps too far

To the soon, parting light, and envious darkness

Had stoln them from me. . . .
1, 208. And airy tongues that lure night-wanderers.

Thou Aittering angel, girt with golden wings,
And thou unspotted form of chastity,
I see ye visibly, and while I see ye,
This darky hollow is a paradise,

And heaven gates o'er my head: now I believe.
1. 219. Would send a glistering cherub . . . .
1. 231. Within thy airy cell.
1. 243. And hold a counterpart to all Heaven's harmonies.

Comus looks in, and speaks. 1, 252. Of darkness, till she smild ... 1. 270. To touch the prospering growth .. .. 1. 310. Without sure steerage . . . . . . . 1. 352. From the chill dew of this dead solitude. (surrounding wild.] 11. 355-359. She leans her thoughtful head, musing at our unkindness.

Or, lost in wild amazement and affright,
So fares as did forsaken Proserpine,
When the big rolling flakes of pitchy clouds

And darkness wound her in.
1. 371. Could stir the stable mood . . . . . .
1. 376. Oft seeks to solitary sweet retire.
11. 384, 385. Walks in black vapours, though the noontide brand

Blaze in the summer solstice.

1. 214.

5.

1. 489.

1. 390. For who would rob a hermit of his beads,

His books, or his hair-gown, or maple dish ? 1. 403. .... this vast and hideous wild. [wide surrounding waste.] 11. 409-415. Secure without all doubt and question : No.

I could be willing [beshrew but I would] though now ith'

dark to try
A rough encounter (passado] with the shaggiest ruffian
That lurks by hedge or lane of this dead circuit,
To have her by my side, though I were sure
She might be free from peril where she is ;

But where an equal, &c.
11. 422-424. And may, on every needful accident,

Be it not done in pride and wilful tempting,

Walk through huge forests ...... 1.425.

• . . . . . . . . . .awe of chastity. 11. 429-430. . . . . . . . . horrid shades

And yawning dens where glaring monsters house. 11. 433, 434. . . . . . . . . . . moory fen

Blue wrinkled hag ........ 1. 452. And sudden adoration of her pureness (bright rays].

Some curld man of the sword [hedger]

Had best look to his forehead; here be brambles. 1. 491. :· ·

pointed stakes. 1. 523. Deep learnt [inured] ...:::::: 1. 531. . . . . . . . . i th' pastured lawns 1. 545. With spreading [blowing] honeysuckle . . . 1. 553. . . . . . ... drowsy-flighted steeds 11. 555, 556. At last a soft [still, sweet,) and solemn breathed sound

Rose like the soft stream of distill'd perfume. 1. 606. . . . . . . all the monstrous bugs. 11. 608-610. And force him to release his new got prey,

Or drag him by the curls and cleave his scalp

Down to the hips. 1.611. But here thy steel can do thee small avail. 1!. 614, 615. . . . . . . . unquilt thy joints,

And crumble every sinew. 1.627.

· · · · · · · of a thousand hues. 1. 636.

. . . . that ancient Moly

Which Mercury to wise Ulysses gave. 11. 657, 658. .. .

I follow thee, And good heaven cast his best regard upon us. 1.661. And you a statue, fixt as Daphne was. 1.688. Thou hast been tir'd ... ... . 1. 707. . . . . . . . . . Stoic gown. 11. 713, 714. Cramming the seas with spawn innumerable,

The fields with cattle, and the air with fowl.
11. 732-737. The sea o'erfraught would heave her waters up

Above the stars, and th' unsought diamonds
Would so bestud the centre with their starlight,

1. 744 1. 749. 1. 807.

And so imblaze the forehead of the deep
Were they not taken thence, that they below
Would grow enur'd to day, and come at last.
It withers on the stalk and fades away.
. . . . . . . . coarse beetle-brows.

This is mere moral stuff; the very lees. 1. 816.

. . . . . . . art reverst. 11. 846-848. . . . . . . . delights to leave

And often takes our cattle with strange pinches

Which she . . . . : : :.... • • 1. 851. Of pansies, and of bonny daffodils. 1. 857. In honour'd Virtue's cause. [In hard distressed need.] 1. 858. And add the power of some strong verse. 1. 895

That my rich wheels inlays. 1. 924. May thy crystal waves for this. 1. 957, in the stage direction ..... President's castle; then enter

country dances and suchlike gambols, &c. At these sports, the Daemon, with the two BROTHERS and the

LADY, enters. The Daemon sings. 1. 962. Of nimbler toes and courtly (such neat] guise. 1. 973. To a crown of deathless bays. 1. 975, stage direction. The Daemon sings or says. 1. 979. Up in the plain fields . . . . . . 11. 982,983. Of Atlas [Hesperus] and his daughters [nieces] three.

[Where grows the high-born gold upon his native tree.] 11. 990-992. About the myrtle alleys fling

Balm and cassia's fragrant smells.

Iris there her garnisht (garisht] bow.
1. 995. Than her watchet scarf can shew.
In second copy :-

Than her purfled scarf can shew
Yellow, watchet, green, and blue,
And drenches oft with manna (Sabaean] dew;

Where many a cherub soft reposes.
1. 1012. Now my message [business) well is done.
11. 1014, 1015.

Far beyond the earth's end

Where the welkin low [clear] doth bend. 1. 1023. Heaven itself would bow to her.

Lycidas.

1. 26. . . . . glimmering eyelids of the morn. 11. 30, 32. . . . . . . . . . Evenstar bright

Towards heaven's descent had slop't his burnisht wheel, 1. 47. . . . . . . . . gay buttons wear [bear]. 11. 58, 61. What could the golden-hair'd Calliope

For her enchanting son

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When she beheld (the gods far-sighted be)

His gory scalp roll down the Thracian lea.
In the margin for the two last lines :-

Whom universal Nature might lament,
And Heaven and Hell deplore,

When his divine head down the stream was sent. 1. 69.

Hid in the tangles . . . . . . 1. 85.

::.... and thou smooth [fam'd] flood,

Soft sliding Mincius . . . . . . . . . 1. 105. Scrawlid o'er with figures dim . . 1. 129.

.
.

. .
.

. . . . . little sed.
.::

. . 1. 138.

::. .: stintly lo
11. 142-151. Bring the rathe primrose that unwedded dies,

Colouring the pale cheek of unenjoy'd love,
And that sad flow'r that strove
To write his own woes on the vermeil grain ;
Next add Narcissus, that still weeps in vain,
The woodbine, and the pansy freakt with jet,
The glowing violet;
The cowslip wan that hangs his pensive head,
And every bud that sorrow's livery wears,

Let daffodillies ··· · · · · · · · 1. 153. Let our sad thoughts........ 1. 153.

. . . . . . the floods and sounding seas. 1. 157.

. . . . . . . . humming tide. 1. 176.

List'ning the unexpressive nuptial song.

Sonnet IV.

1. 7.
1. 13.

And at thy blooming virtue..
Opens the door of bliss that hour of night.

Sonnet VIII.

11. 3, 4. Words with just notes, when most were wont to scan

With Midas ears, misjoining short and long. 11. 6-8. And gives thee praise above the pipe of Pan,

To after age thou shalt be writ a man,

Thou didst reform thy art the chief among. 11. 12, 13. Fame by the Tuscan's leave shall set thee higher

Than old Casell, whom Dante woo'd to sing.

Sonnet IX.

ll. 3, 4.

. .. earthly clod. Of flesh and sin, which man from heaven doth sever.

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Straight follow'd thee the path that saints have trod
Still as they journey'd from this dark abode
Up to the realm of peace and joy for ever.
Faith shew'd the way, and she who saw them best
Thy handmaids. · · · · · · · ·

1. 12. 1. 17.

On the New Forcers of Conscience.
By hair-brain'd Edwards.
Crop ye as close as marginal P 's ears.

Sonnet XII.
. . . . . . . her serpent wings.
For what can war but acts of war still breed
Till injur'd truth from violence be freed
And public faith be rescu'd from the brand.

1. 8.
11. 10-12.

Sonnet XIII.
:::...... through a crowd,
Not of war only, but distractions rude.
And fought God's battles, and his works pursu'd.
While Darwent stream . . . . . . . .
And twenty battles more. Yet much remains.
No less than those of War . · · · · ·

1. 10.

1. 1. 1. 7.

Sonnet XIV.
. . . . . . . . in sage councils old.
. . . . . . . may be best upheld

Mann'd by her two main nerves.
1. II. What serves each . . . . . . .
11. II, 14. On thy right hand Religion leans
And reckons thee in chief her eldest son.

Sonnet XVII.

1. 3.

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Il. 4, 5.

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1. 7.

. . . . . . . . . bate one jot. 11. 12-14. Whereof all Europe rings [MS. talks ] from side to side; .

This thought might lead me through this world's vain mask,
Content, though blind, had I no other guide.

i Prynne's. See note.

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