Biblical Religion and Family Values: A Problem in the Philosophy of Culture

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001 - 357 páginas

In this broad philosophical examination of the relationship between religion and the family, Jay Newman delves into issues concerning Biblical religion, culture, sociology, and family values. He maintains that recent media debates about the Bible and family values have obscured the complex relationship between the family and religion.

Focusing on how the family values that the Biblical literature imparts might be relevant--or irrelevant--to family problems and other cultural problems in a modern Western democracy, this study contributes to the understanding of basic cultural relations between religion and the family. After reflecting on the effects of much Biblical teaching on the family, the book proceeds to explore the cultural and existential significance of competition and cooperation between Biblical religion and the family.

 

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Contenido

The Birth of a Nation
17
The Economy
33
The State
65
The Culture
87
The Education System
127
Australiathe FiftyFirst State
153
Australia in 2050
163
The Centenary of Federation TenPoint Plan
169
Acknowledgments ix
in Genesis 33
33
Strange Family Values of the New Testament 129
129
The Family as an Unbiblical Institution
195
Competition and Cooperation between Biblical Religion and
241
Cultural and Existential Significance of Some Divided Loyalties
269
Bibliography
331
Index
343

Selected Bibliography
175

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Acerca del autor (2001)

JAY NEWMAN is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Guelph. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a past president of the Canadian Theological Society. He is the author of ten books, including Religion vs. Television (Praeger, 1996) and Religion and Technology (Praeger, 1997).

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