Power to Hurt: The Virtues of Alienation

Portada
University of Illinois Press, 1998 - 243 páginas
William Monroe
addresses what William J. Bennett ignores in The Book of Virtues:
How do readers use literature as "equipment for living"?
Tackling modernism
and postmodernism, Monroe outlines "virtue criticism," an alternative
to current theory. Focusing on works by T. S. Eliot, Vladimir Nabokov,
and Donald Barthelme, he demonstrates that these alienistic texts are
not just filled with belligerence but are also endowed with virtues, such
as trust and the promise of solidarity with the reader. By considering
these vital texts as responses to personal situations and institutional
practices, Monroe brings literature back to the common reader and shows
how it offers functional responses to the dysfunctional situations of
modern life.
Readers interested
in literary criticism, American culture, and the relationship between
ethics and literature will be fascinated by virtue criticism and this
fresh look at the virtues and vices of alienation.
Chosen as a Choice Magazine's Outstanding Academic Book for 1999.
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

VIRTUE CRITICISM
13
A Performance Paradigm 22
22
Reading Empathy Alienation 38
38
Virtue Criticism as Cultural Criticism 50
50
Necessary Troublemakers 61
61
Heavens Graces Gnostic Strategies 78
78
Sweetest Things Aesthetic Strategies 88
88
Natures Riches Parabolic Strategies 101
101
Reluctant Performers 119
119
Others but Stewards T S Eliots Gnostic Impulse 134
134
Lords and Owners Vladimir Nabokovs Sequestered Imagination 155
155
The Basest Weed Donald Barthelmes Parabolic Fairy Tale 176
176
LiliesThat Fester 195
195
NotKnowing 215
215
225
225
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 1 - They that have power to hurt and will do none, That do not do the thing they most do show, Who, moving others, are themselves as stone. Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow. They rightly do inherit heaven's graces And husband nature's riches from expense-, They are the lords and owners of their faces. Others but stewards of their excellence.
Página 1 - For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds ; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.

Información bibliográfica