The Poetry of Flowers and Flowers of Poetry: To which are Added, a Simple Treatise on Botany, with Familiar Examples, and a Copious Floral Dictionary

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Frances Sargent Osgood
J. C. Riker, 1848 - 276 páginas

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Página 219 - To her fair works did Nature link The human soul that through me ran; And much it grieved my heart to think What man has made of man. Through primrose tufts, in that sweet bower, The periwinkle trailed its wreaths; And 'tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes.
Página 60 - Alas! — how light a cause may move Dissension between hearts that love! Hearts that the world in vain had tried And sorrow but more closely tied; That stood the storm when waves were rough Yet in a sunny hour fall off, Like ships that have gone down at sea When heaven was all tranquillity!
Página 211 - No, the heart that has truly loved never forgets, But as truly loves on to the close ; As the sun-flower turns on her god, when he sets, The same look which she turned when he rose.
Página 107 - Ah, what a life were this! how sweet! how lovely! Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings that fear their subjects
Página 154 - For they that led us away captive, required of us then a song, and melody in our heaviness : Sing us one of the songs of Sion. 4 How shall we sing the LORD'S song in a strange land?
Página 231 - Oh! too convincing — dangerously dear — In woman's eye the unanswerable tear ! That weapon of her weakness she can wield, To save, subdue — at once her spear and shield: Avoid it — Virtue ebbs and Wisdom errs, Too fondly gazing on that grief of hers ! What lost a world, and hade a hero fly ? The timid tear in Cleopatra's eye.
Página 131 - Who, in their nightly watchful spheres, Lead in swift round the months and years. The sounds and seas, with all their finny drove, Now to the moon in wavering morrice move ; And on the tawny sands and shelves Trip the pert fairies and the dapper elves. By dimpled brook and fountain brim, The wood-nymphs, decked with daisies trim, Their merry wakes and pastimes keep.
Página 143 - In peace, Love tunes the shepherd's reed; In war, he mounts the warrior's steed; In halls, in gay attire is seen; In hamlets, dances on the green. Love rules the court, the camp, the grove, And men below, and saints above ; For love is heaven, and heaven is love.
Página 202 - And she went up, and laid him on the bed of the man of God, and shut the door upon him, and went out.
Página 228 - He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the service of man: that he may bring forth food out of the earth...

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