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Would they strip from us: being valued thus,
As much as would maintain, to the king's honour,
Full fifteen earls, and fifteen hundred knights :
Six thousand and two hundred good esquires ;
And, to relief of lazars, and weak age,
Of indigent faint souls, past corporal toil,
A hundred alms-houses, right well supplied;
And to the coffers of the king beside,
A thousand pounds by the year: Thus runs the bill.

Ely. This would drink deep.
Cant.
'Twould drink the

cup

and all.
Ely. But what prevention?
Cant. The king is full of grace, and fair regard.
Ely. And a true lover of the holy church.

Cant. The courses of his youth promis'd it not.
The breath no sooner left his father's body,
But that his wildness, mortified in him,
Seem'd to die too3: yea, at that very

moment,
Consideration like an angel came,
And whipp'd the offending Adam out of him:
Leaving his body as a paradise,
To envelop and contain celestial spirits.
Never was such a sudden scholar made:
Never came reformation in a flood,
With such a heady current, scouring faults;
Nor never hydra-headed wilfulness
So soon did lose his seat, and all at once,
As in this king.
Ely.

We are blessed in the change.
Cant. Hear him but reason in divinity,

• The breath no sooner left his father's body,
But that his wildness, mortified in him,

Seem'd to die too.'
The same thought occurs in the preceding play, where King
Henry V. says:

• My father is gone wild into his grave,
For in his tomb lie my affections.'

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5

And, all admiring, with an inward wish
You would desire, the king were made a prelate:
Hear him debate of commonwealth affairs,
You would say,—it hath been all in all his study:
Lint hin die

and vou shall hear
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As much as would maintain, to the king's honour,
Full fifteen earls, and fifteen hundred knights:
Six thousand and two hundred good esquires ;

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And, all admiring, with an inward wish
You would desire, the king were made a prelate:
Hear him debate of commonwealth affairs,

would say, -it hath been all in all his study: List his discourse of war, and

you

shall hear
A fearful battle render'd you in musick :
Turn him to any cause of policy,
The Gordian knot of it he will unloose,
Familiar as his garter ; that, when he speaks,
The air, a charter'd libertine, is still,
And the mute wonder lurketh in men's ears,
To steal his sweet and honeyed sentences;
So that the art and practick part of life
Must be the mistress to this theorick?:
Which is a wonder, how his grace shouļd glean it,
Since his addiction was to courses vain :
His companies & unletter'd, rude, and shallow;
His hours fill'd up with riots, banquets, sports;
And never noted in him any study,
Any retirement, any sequestration
From open haunts and popularity 9. .

Ely. The strawberry grows underneath the nettle;
And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best,

6 Johnson has noticed the exquisite beauty of this line. We have the same thought in As You Like It, Act ii. Sc. 7:

I must have liberty
Withal, as large a charter as the wind,
To blow on whom I please.'
* So that the art and practick part of life

Must be the mistress to his theorick.'
He discourses with so much skill on all subjects, 'that his theory
must have been taught by art and practice, which is strange,
since he could see little of the true art or practice among his
loose companions, nor ever retired to digest his practice into
theory. Practick and theorick, or rather practique and theorique,
was the old orthography of practice and theory.

8 Companies, for companions.

9 Popularity meant familiarity with the common people, as well as popular favour or applause. See Florio in voce Popolarita.

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