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Early England.

SOME NOTES USED AS FOREWORDS TO A COLLECTION
OF TREATISES ON “MANNERS & MEALS IN OLDEN TIME”

FOR THE EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY,

BY
FREDERICK J: FURNIVALL, M.A.
TRIN. HALL, CAMBRIDGE; MEMBER OF COUNCIL OF THE PHILOLOGICAL

AND EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETIES.

LONDON :
N. TRÜBNER & co., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW.

1867

Price One Shilling.

[As the subject of these notes may interest many people into whose hands the volume of which the notes constitute the Preface may not fall, 500 copies have been pulled for separate circulation. But it is the plain duty of all Schoolmasters and Educators to join the Early English Text Society at once.]

JOHN CHILDS AND SON, PRINTERS.

CORRIGENDA, ADDITIONAL NOTES, &c.

p. iv. l. 6. "Your Bele Babees are very like the Meninos of the Court of Spain, & Menins of that of France, young nobles brought up with the young Princes.' H. Reeve.

p. iv. I. 12, for of .. Statutes read on .. Studies

p. v. last line. This is not intended to confine the definition of Music as taught at Oxford to its one division of Harmonica, to the exclusion of the others, Rythmica, Metrica, &c. The Arithmetic said to have been studied there in the time of Edmund the Confessor is defined in his Life (MS. about 1310 A.D.) in my E. E. Poems & Lives of Saints, 1862, thus,

Arsmetrike is a lore : þat of figours al is

& of drauztes as me draweb in poudre : & in numbre iwis. p. x. last line, for Books read Book

p. xviii. 1. 16. The regular Cathedral school would have existed at St David's. p. xix., note 4 “There are no French universities, though we find

every now and then some humbug advertising himself in the Times as possessing a degree of the Paris University. The old Universities belong to the time before the Deluge—that means before the Revolution of 1789. The University of France is the organized whole of the higher and middle institutions of learning, in so far as they are directed by the State, not the clergy. It is an institution more governmental, according to the genius of the country, than our London University, to which, however, its organization bears some resemblance. To speak of it in one breath with Oxford or Aberdeen is to commit the

error of confounding two things, or placing them on the same line, because they have the same name.”—E. Oswald, in The English Leader, Aug. 10, 1867.

p. xxiv. 1. 9, for 1574 read 1577.

p. xxv. 1. 17, related apparently. “ The first William de Valence married Joan de Monchensi, sister-in-law to one Dionysia, and aunt to another." The Chronicle, Sept. 21, 1867.

p. xxvi. One of the inquiries ordered by the Articles issued by Archbishop Cranmer, in A.D. 1548, is, “Whether Parsons, Vicars, Clerks and other beneficed men, having yearly to dispend an hundred pound, do not find, competently, one scholar in the University of Cambridge or Oxford, or some grammar school ; and for as many hundred pounds as every of them may dispend, so many scholars likewise to be found [supported by them; and what be their names that they so find.” Toulmin Smith, The Parish, p. 95. Compare also in Church-Wardens Accompts of St Margaret's, Westminster (ed. Jn. Nichols, p. 41).

2-16-32 AIM

classed

CORRIGENDA, NOTES, ETC.

1631. Item, to Richard Busby, a king's scholler of Westminster, towards

enabling him to proceed master of arts at Oxon, by consent of the vestrie

£6. 13. 4. 1628. Item, to Richard Busby, by consent of the vestry, towards enabling him to proceed bachelor of arts

£5. 0.0. Nichols, p. 38. See too p. 37.

p. xxvii., last line. Roger Bacon died, perhaps, 11 June, 1292, or in 1294. Book of Dates.

p. xxvii., dele note 3. The truth is that, in his account of Oxford and its early days, Mr Hallam quotes John of Salisbury, not as asserting that Vacarius taught there, but as making“ no mention of Oxford at all”; while he gives for the statement about the law school no authority whatever beyond his general reference throughout to Anthony Wood. But the fact is as historical as a fact can well be, and the authority for it is a passage in one of the best of the contemporary authors, Gervaise of Canterbury. "Tunc leges et causidici in Angliam primo vocati sunt,” he says in his account of Theobald in the Acts of the Archbishops, quorum primus erat magister Vacarius. Hic in Oxonefordiâ legem docuit." : "E. A. F.

p. xxxii. note, 1. 1, for St Paul's read St Anthony's p. xxxiv., for sister read brother

p. xlv. 1. 2, for poor read independent. Fitz-Stephen says on the parents of St Thomas, “ Neque fænerantibus neque officiose negotiantibus, sed de redditibus suis honorifice viventibus." ' E A. F.

p. liii. Thetford. See also p. xli.
p. lxvii., for Browne read Bourne
p. lxxii. 1. 6 from foot, for Jounes read Jonnes

3, Old Square, Lincoln's Inn, W.C.

10 June, 1867.

27 Oct, og ruc,

DEAR SIR,

The state of the Early English Text Society's work, and its subscriptions for the present year, is this :

There is now at press £950 worth of work, and about £300 worth more ought to go to press--will be ready for it, and is wanted by students before the close of the year.

The Society's income to meet this expenditure will not be more than £500. The balance, and the Texts represented by it, will have to be carried over to, and kept back till, next year, unless some measure of relief can be adopted.

The Committee have unanimously rejected the proposal to double Members' subscription, because they know that many Members have resolved to limit their expenditure on Texts to a yearly guinea, and any quasi-compulsory effort to raise the subscription would be alike repulsive to the feelings of the Committee and the unwilling Members.

But the Committee see no objection to a voluntary effort to relieve the present income of part of the burden laid on it, and they have sanctioned my submitting to you the plan herein-after laid down. By your leave, I will put it to you in the personal way in which it came to me.

Mr Richard Morris was the cause of it, as he was of the founding of the Society. When in 1863 he was sending extracts from English MSS. abroad to be printed in a foreign journal, because there was no journal or Society in England to print them, it did seem to me a shame, and that if people only knew it, they'd stop it. The result was the getting-up of the Early English Text Society, which, to say the least of it, has done some worthy work for our Language and Literature.

Now in 1867 comes a block-up. Mr Morris and Mr Skeat, for instance,--not to name other Editors,—are willing to give us more work! than we can print, and it does seem a shame that they should be kept standing still for want of money only. The question for the rest of us is : Are we, after having had from these Editors such magnificent voluntaries as The Ayenbite and the Vernon Langlande's Piers

1" I think you ought in all justice to add a note somewhere, that the quantity of work done by some editors is not owing to any haste on their part, but to the vast amount of time which they give to the Society.” My own belief is that all readers of our books know that the average of our work is up to, if not above, that of the average of any other Society.

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