Devonshire & Other Original Poems: With Some Account of Ancient Customs, Superstitions, and Traditions

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Printed and published at the office of the Devon Weekly Times, 1873 - 94 páginas
 

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Página 92 - ... soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep ; and then anon Drums in his ear, at which he starts, and wakes ; And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again. This is that very Mab, That plats the manes of horses in the night ; And bakes the elf-locks in foul sluttish hairs, Which, once untangled, much misfortune bodes...
Página 36 - A brilliant morning shines on the old city. Its antiquities and ruins are surpassingly beautiful, with a lusty ivy gleaming in the sun, and the rich trees waving in the balmy air. Changes of glorious light from moving boughs, songs of birds, scents from gardens, woods, and fields — or, rather, from the one great garden of the whole cultivated island in its yielding time — penetrate into the Cathedral, subdue its earthy odour, and preach the Resurrection and the Life.
Página 66 - Here's to thee, old apple-tree, Whence thou mayst bud, and whence thou mayst blow ! And whence thou mayst bear apples enow ! Hats full! caps full! Bushel — bushel — sacks full, And my pockets full too ! Huzza...
Página 67 - Monday's child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go, Friday's child is loving and giving, Saturday's child has to work for its living, But a child that's born on the Sabbath day Is fair and wise and good and gay.
Página 68 - Rev. Sir, I should take it as a great favour if your Honour would be good enough to let me have the key of the churchyard to-night, to go in at twelve o'clock, to cut off...
Página 87 - ... and there would be no end to it. The matter was discussed, a justice consulted, and a clergyman to boot ; and it was thought that, however clever the devil might be, law and church combined would be more than a match for him. It was therefore agreed that, as the boy was singularly regular in the hour at which he came to announce the sight of the hare, all should be in readiness for a start the instant such information was given : and a neighbour of the witch, nothing friendly to her, promised...
Página 93 - In the name of God I will go down.' She did so. Passing over the stairs she perceived a shadow, and then she heard footsteps ; and when she came to the pump she felt a hand on her shoulder. She turned and perceived a tall man. Summoning a good resolution, however, she said, 'In the name of God, why troublest thou me?' The ghost replied, 'It is well for thee that thou hast spoken to me in the name of God; this being the last time allotted me to trouble this world, or else I should have injured thee....
Página 65 - Wassaile the trees that they may beare You many a plum and many a peare; For more or less fruits they will bring As you so give them wassailing.
Página 67 - Oliver,1' dressed in black, with his face and hands smeared over with soot and grease, and his body bound by a strong cord, the end of which is held by one of the men to prevent his running too far. After these come another troop, dressed in the same style, each man bearing a large branch of oak...
Página 78 - These make our girls their sluttery rue, By pinching them both black and blue, And put a penny in their shoe The house for cleanly sweeping...

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