Works of Francis Bacon, Volumen12

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Brown and Taggard, 1860

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Página 243 - some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts ; others to be read, but not curiously ; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others
Página 348 - ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore if a man write little, hee had neede haue a great memory; if he confer little, hee had neede haue a present wit, and if he read little, hee had neede haue much cunning, to seeme to know that hee doth not. Histories make men wise, Poets
Página 242 - For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best from those that are learned. To spend too much time in studies is sloth;
Página 230 - And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight, than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air. 1
Página 97 - never do if she find him jealous. Wives are young men's mistresses ; companions for middle age ; and old men's nurses. So as a man may have a quarrel to marry when he will. But yet he was reputed one of the wise men, that made answer to the question, when a man should marry ? — A young man
Página 76 - for the lie's sake. But I cannot tell: this same truth is a naked and open day-light, that doth not shew the masks and mummeries and triumphs of the world, half so stately and daintily as candle-lights. Truth may perhaps come to the price of a pearl, that
Página 87 - of France; and many more. But in private revenges it is not so. Nay rather, vindictive persons live the life of witches; who, as they are mischievous, so end they infortunate. V. OF ADVERSITY. IT was a high speech of Seneca (after the manner of the Stoics), that the good things which belong to
Página 243 - head ; and the like. So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics ; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find
Página 75 - which are of the same veins, though there be not so much blood in them as was in those of the ancients. But it is not only the difficulty and labour which men take in finding out of truth; nor again that when it is found it imposeth upon men's thoughts;
Página 243 - And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory ; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit : and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise ; poets witty ; the mathematics subtile ; natural philosophy deep ; moral grave ; 5 logic and rhetoric able to contend.

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