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BROWN, J. MACMILLAN. The Dutch East: Sketches and Pictures.
P.J. Treat...

483

CHAPIN, F. STUART. An Introduction to the Study of Social Evolu-

tion. F. H. Hankins.....

122

DowD, JEROME. The Negro Races, a Sociological Study.

341

EDWARDS, ALBERT. The Barbary Coast..

340-341

ELLIS, GEORGE W. Negro Culture in West Africa.

336

FIELDING-Hall, H. The Passing of Empire.....

346-348

FISCHER, EUGEN. Die Rehobother Bastards und das Bastardierungs-

problem beim Menschen..

336-337

FULLER, SIR BAMPFYLDE. The Empire of India..

350-351

FURLONG, CHARLES WELLINGTON. The Gateway to the Sahara.. 468-469

VAN GENNEP, ARNOLD. En Algérie...

337-338

GULICK, SIDNEY L. The American Japanese Problem.

469-470

HARADA, Tasuky. The Faith of Japan....

470-472

HEADLAND, Isaac TAYLOR. Home Life in China..

474
Huan-ChaNG, CHEN. The Economic Principles of Confucius and
his School.....

230

JONES, GEORGE HEBER. One of Japan's Great Problems.

330-335

JONES, LIVINGSTON F. A Study of the Thlingets of Alaska..

476-477

JUNOD, HENRI A. The Life of a South African Tribe..

338

KAWAKAMI, Kıyoshi K. Asia at the Door...

475-476

LAZAROVICH-HREBELANOVICH. The Orient Question, Today and

Tomorrow.

473-474

Low, SIDNEY. Egypt in Transition..

477-478

MABIE, HAMILTON WRIGHT. Japan, Today and Tomorrow.

480
MARTIN, Asa E. Our Negro Population .

344
MECHLIN, John MOFFATT. Democracy and Race Friction..

341-342
MILLER, KELLY. Out of the House of Bondage ...

345-346
Mitra, S. M. Anglo-Indian Studies..

348-350
NANSEN, FRIDJTOF. Through Siberia, the Land of the Future 467-468
PARKER, H. Village Folk-Tales of Ceylon.....

472-473
Quillin, FRANK U. The Color Line in Ohio....

343-344
REINHEIMER, HERMANN. Evolution by Coöperation. F. H. Han-
kins..

123

RUSSELL, John H. The Free Negro in Virginia....

342-343

STARR, FREDERICK. Liberia:History, Description, Problems.

345

WEEKS, John H. Among Congo Cannibals.....

340

WESTERMARCK, EDWARD. Marriage Ceremonies in Morocco..

339

WIRTH, ALBRECHT. Rasse und Volk..

478-480

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CONTENTS

CONTRASTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONALITY IN THE ANGLO-

AND LATIN-AMERICAN

By Señor Don Federico A. Pezet, Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary from Peru....

1

Pan-AMERICAN POSSIBILITIES

By John Barrett, Director-General of the Pan-American

Union, formerly United States Minister to Siam, Argen-

tina, Panama and Colombia....

19

PATAGONIA AND TIERRA DEL FUEGO

By José Moneta, Captain, Argentina Navy, Commanding

Battleship. "Rivadaira," formerly member of the Argen-

tina Boundary Commissions with Chile and Brazil....

THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR LATIN-AMERICAN TRADE

By Hon. John Hays Hammond, LL.D..

44

THE PROBABLE EFFECT OF THE OPENING OF THE PANAMA CANAL ON

OUR ECONOMIC RELATIONS WITH THE PEOPLE OF THE WEST

COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA

By Hiram Bingham, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin-

American History, Yale University ..

49

ADVANTAGES OF MAKING THE CANAL ZONE A FREE CITY AND FREE PORT

By W. D. Boyce, Publisher, The Saturday Blade and

Chicago Ledger...

68

HIGHER EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA

By Edgar Ewing Brandon, Ph.D., Vice-President of Miami

University...

84

THE UNIVERSITIES AND AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

By George W. Nasmyth, Ph.D., President of the Eighth

International Congress of Students; Director of the In-

ternational Bureau of Students....

... 98

Tax RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH THE LATIN-AMERICAN

REPUBLICS

By Leopold Grahame, formerly editor of "The Buenos Aires

Herald) and of “The Argentina Year Book”..

... 105

THE MIND OF THE LATIN-AMERICAN NATIONS

By David Montt, General Correspondent of "El Diario

Ilustrado," Santiago, Chile.

114

NOTES AND REVIEWS..

CLARK UNIVERSITY

WORCESTER, MASS.

LOUIS N. WILSON, Publiator

ISSUED QUARTERLY $2.00 A YEAR

50 CENTS A COPY

EDITORS

GEORGE H. BLAKESLDE, Ph.D.

President G. STANLEY HALL, LL.D.

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Dean DAVID P. BARROWS, Ph.D.....

University of California Professor FRANZ Boas, LL.D....

...Columbia University Professor W. I. CHAMBERLAIN, Ph.D.....

.Rutgers College Professor W. E. B. DUBOIs, Ph.D....

...New York GEORGE W. ELLIS, K.C., F.R.G.S....

..... Chicago WM. CURTIS FARABEE, Ph.D...... ....University of Pennsylvania President A. F. GRIFFITHS..

...Oahu College, Honolulu Ass't-Professor FRANK H. HANKINS, Ph.D...

.....Clark College Ass't-Professor ELLSWORTH HUNTINGTON, Ph.D.......... Yale University Professor J. W. JØNKS, LL.D......,

.New York University GEORGE HEBER JONES, D.D..

Seoul, Korea John P. JONES, D.D......

..Madura, India Associate Professor A. L. KROEBER, Ph.D........ University of California Professor GEORGE TRUMBULL LADD, LL.D.

..Yale University Professor EDWARD C. MOORE, Ph.D...

Harvard University K. NATERAJAN..

Bombay, India JAMES A. ROBERTSON, L.H.D....

Manila Professor Wm. R. SHEPHERD, Ph.D........

Columbia University Associate Professor PAYSON J. TREAT, Ph.D........ Stanford University Ass't-Professor FREDERICK W. WILLIAMS..

Yale University

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Articles intended for publication, and all correspondence relating to the editorial department of the JOURNAL, should be addressed to Dr. George H. Blakeslee, Clark University, Worcester, Mass.

Books for review, exchanges, subscriptions, and all correspondence relating thereto abould be addressed to Dr. Louis N. Wilson, Clark University Library, Worcester, Mas.

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Copyright, 1914, Clark University.
The printing of this number was completed July 22, 1914.

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2.

THE JOURNAL OF
RACE DEVELOPMENT

Vol. 5

JULY, 1914

No. 1

CONTRASTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONALITY IN THE ANGLO- AND LATIN

AMERICAN

By Señor Don Federico A. Pezet, Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary from Peru

I have chosen as my subject, a question that is most important at this time, when there is a growing tendency to know better and understand the peoples of the LatinAmerican nations; to get closer to them by establishing bonds of friendship through commercial relations based on mutual respect and confidence, as is evidenced by this conference, and by the recent utterances of the President of the United States in his memorable declarations at Mobile.

In order to determine properly the relative positions and conditions of the two great groups of individuals that people this American world, north and south of the Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico, we must first study the contrasts in the development of nationality in these two groups that, for expediency, I shall denominate or class as“Anglo-American,” and “Latin-American."

No man can truly appreciate another, if he does not know him. No nation can feel friendship towards another if it does not know it. But to know, should imply understanding, without which there can be nothing in common, and understanding is an essential to draw individuals together, and so it is with nations.

International relations are necessary, they are cultivated for many reasons, but they do not necessarily mean friendship. Nations, like individuals, live on good terms with their neighbors because it behooves them to do so, but this

1

THE JOURNAL OF RACE DEVELOPMENT, VOL. 5, NO. 1, 1914

does not imply that they are friends, that there is any closer relation between them, other than one of courteous deference towards each other.

Such neighbors, whether they be individuals or nations, do not know each other, much less do they understand each other. There is consequently, no true friendship between them; no bond of union. Therefore, if such people wish to become friendly they must begin by knowing each other, becoming acquainted through intercourse and thus, discover their respective traits and characteristics, so that, in course of time, a sentiment of understanding is born, which, being reciprocal, eventually gives way to friendship, and in like manner to amity between nations.

Therefore, as a first essential to the study of the subject matter of these remarks, we must place ourselves in a position to perfectly understand the very peculiar conditions of settlement and growth of Latin America, before we can hope to obtain any fair estimate of present day Latin America.

These conditions were very different to those that have been found in Anglo America. This is a most important point and one that should be made clear to all who in this nation and elsewhere are trying to know and understand Latin America and its people.

When this point becomes apparent to all, then I shall expect to see another attitude towards our people. I contend, that the average Anglo-American does not appreciate us because he invariably wants to measure us by his own standards, regardless of the fact that those standards do not happen to fit our special type of humanity.

Physically, we are more or less similar, but in a moral sense, each has special traits of character that mark the peculiar idiosyncrasies in each. Therefore, if we reverse the process and we Latin-Americans measure you AngloAmericans by our standards, we likewise would find you as below par, according to our estimate, which proves my premises, that, firstly, secondly and lastly, we have to thoroughly understand each other, if there is to be any reciprocal appreciation, and it behooves us to be forebearing, generous

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