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ECLOGUE, 147

And comprehend the blessings they bestow.

So reclus'd hermits ofien times do know

More of Heaven's glory than a worldling can. 59

As man is of the world, the heart of man

Is an epitome of God's great book

Of creatures, and men need no farther look;

So 's the country of courts, where sweet peace doth,

As their own common soul, give life to both:

And am I then from court?

Allovhanes. Dreamer! thou art:
Think'st thou, Fantastique! that thou hast a part
In the Indian fleet, because thou hast
A little spice or amber in thy taste? 60

Because thou art.not fro2en, art thou warm?
Seest thou all good, because thou seest no harm?
The earth doth in her inner bowels hold
Stuff well dispos'd, and which would fain be gold,
But never shall, except it chance to lie
So upward, that Heav'n gild it with his eye.
As for divine things, faith comes from above,
So, for best civil use all tinctures move
From higher powers: from God religion springs,
Wisdom and honour from the use of kings;
Then unbeguile thyself, and know with me,
That angels, tho' on eanh employ'd they be,
Are still in hsav'n; so is he still at home
That doth abroad to hoiust actions come.

D,mic.2 N ij

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Chide thyself then, O Fool! which yesterday

Might'st have read more than all thy books bewray,

Hast thou a history which doth present

A court where all affections do assent

Unto Hie king's, and that that king's are just?

And where it is no levity to trui.t, 80

Where there is no ambition but t' obey,

Where men need whisper nothing and yet may;

Where the king's favours are so plac'd, that all

Find that the king therein is liberal

To them, in him, because his f.ivoursbend

To virtue, to the which they all pretend?

Thou hast no such, yet here was this, and more;

An earnest lover, wise then, and before.

Our little Cupid hath sued livery,

Ard is no more in his minority: 99

He is admitted now into that breast'

Where the king's counsels apd his secrets rest.

What hast thou lost? O ignorant mail!

Inios. I know All this, and only therefqre I withdrew. To know and feel all this, and not to have Words to express i(, makes a man a grave Of his own thoughts: I would not therefore stay At a great feast, having no grace to say i And yet I 'scap'd not here; for being come to?

Full of the common joy, I utler'd some.

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If by that manly courage they be try'd
Which scorns unjust opinion, then the bride
Becomes a man: should chance cr envy's art
Divide these two, whom Nature scarce did part,
Since both have the inflaming eye, and both the loving
heart?

III^HAISINC Or THE BRIDEGROOM.

Tho' it be some divorce to think of you i jrs

Single, so much one are you two,
Let me here contemplate thee
First, chearful Bridegroom: and first let me see
How thou prevent'st the sun,
And his red foaming horses dost outrun;
How, having laid down in thy sovereign's breast
All businesses, from thence to re-invest
Them, when these triumphs cease, thou forward art
To shew to her, who doth the like impart, 139

.The fire of thy inflaming eyes, and of thy loving hear-t.

IV. RAISING Or THE BRIDE.

Bit now to thee, fair Bride! it is some wrong
To fhmk thou wert in bed so long;
Since soon thou Uest down first, 'tis fit
Thou in first rising should allow for it.
fowder thy radiant hair,
Which if without such ashes thou wouldst wear,

ZCLOCCt. 151

Thou who, (0 all which come to look upon,
Wert meant for Phoebus, wouldst be Phaeton.
For our ease give thine eyes th' unusual part
Cf joy, a tear; so quench'd thou may'st impart 15*
To us that come thy' inflaming eyes, to him thy loving
heart.

V. HEn ArPARPLIINR,

Thus thou descend'st to our infirmity, Who can the sun in water see; go dost thou when in silk and gold Thou clpud'st thyself; since we which do behold Are dust and worms 'tis just Our objects be the fruits of worms and dust. Let ev'ry jewel be a glorious star, Yet stars are not so pure as their spheres are; And tho' thou stoop t' appear to us in part, i&i

Still in that picture thou intirely art,' Which thy inflaming eyes have made within his lovinjf heart.

VI. GOING TO THE CHAPEL.

Now from your east you issue forth, and we,
As men which thro' a cypress see
The rising sun, do think it two;
So as you go to church do think of you:
But that veil being gone,
By tiie church rites you are from thenceforth o.

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