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III*.

Our mute harps, untun'd, unstrung,

Up we hung

On green wil lows near bes'de us l

Where we, sitting all forlorn,

Thus in scorn

Our proud spoilers' 'gan deride us.

.IV.

Come, sad captives! leav» your moans,

And your groans

Under Sion's ruins bury; .«

Tune your harps; and sing us lays

In the praise

Of ytur God, and let's be merry.,

Vi

Can, ah! can we leave cur moans,

And our groans

Under Sion's ruins bury?

Can we in this land sing lays

In the praise

Of our God, and here be merry?

VI.

No; dear Sion! if I yet

Do forget

Thine affliction miserable, . ..

let my nimble joints become

Stiffand numb,

To touch warbling harp unable.

V.lum* 11. H

VI I.

Let my tongue lose singing skid,

Let it still

To my parched roof be g'ew'd,

If in either harp or voice

I rejoice

Till thy joys shall be renew'd.

VIII,

Lord, curse Edom's trait'rous kind;

Bear in mind

In our ruins how they revell'd:

"Sack, kill, burn," they cry'd out still,

"Sack, burn, kill;

"Down with all, let all be leveled."

IX.

And thou, Babel! when the tide

Of thy pride,

Now a-fiowing, grows to turning,

Victor now shall then be thrall,

And shall fall

To as low an ebb of mourning.

x, Happy he who shall thee waste, As thou hast

Us, without all mercy, wasted;
And shall make thee taste and see
What poor we,
By thy means, have seen and tasted.

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Si Ef.f, sleept old Sun! thou canst not have repast
As yet the wound, thou took'st on Friday last .„
Bleep, then, and rest; the world may bear thy stay,
A better Sun rose before thee to.day;
Who, not content t' enlighten all that dwell
On the earth's face, as thou enlight'ned hell,
And made the dark fires languish in that vale,
As at thy presence here our fires grow pale;
Whose body having walk'd on earth and now
Hast'ning to heav'n, would that he might allow I
Himself unto all stations, and fill all, . - . '..

For these three days become a mineral.
He was all gold when he lay down, but rose
All tincture, and doth not alone dispose
Leaden and iron wills to good, but is
Of pow'r to make ev'n sinful flesh like his.
Had one of those, whose credulous piety
Thought that a soul one might di:cern and see
Detmt.J . '' H ij

Go from a body, at this sepulchre been,
And issuing from the sheet ihis body.een,
He would have jusily thought this body a soul,
If not of any man, yet of the whole.
Dcsuht extern.

1'O SIR ROBERT CARR."'

Sir, .i:i\±d

} presume ycu rather try what you can do in me, than zvbat I can do in verse: you know my uttermost when it .was best, and even then 1 did best when I bad least truth for my subjects, in this present case here is so mueb truth as it defeats all poe'.ry: call, therefore, this paper by zviat name you will, and fit be vet worthy cf him, nor vfy?«t nor cfme, smother it, and be that the sacrifce. " ff'youbaS commanded me to' have wilted on his body to Scotland, and preached there, I would have embraced the obligation tv':b mure alacrity; but 1 tbank you that you will tonnnand me thai which I was loth to do, for even that baib given a tincture of merit to the obedience of

Tour poor friend and servant in Christ Jesus,

J. DONNE.

AN HYMN

TO THE SAINTS, AND TO MARpL'IS HAMILTON.

\vh. TnEit that soul, which Now comes up to you, Fill any former rank, or make a new l

Divine raiMS; 89

.Whether it take a name nam'd there before,
Or be a name itself, and order more
Than was in heav'n till now; (for may not he
Be so, if every several angel be
A kind alone) Whatever order grow
Greater by him in heav'n, we do not so.
One of your orders grows by his access,
But by his loss grow all our orders less.
The name of Father, Master, Friend, the name
Of Subject and of Prince, in one is lame;
Fair mirth is damp'd, and conversation black,
The Household widow'd, and the Garter slack;
The Chapel wants an ear, Council a tongue;
Story a theme, and Music lacks a song.
Blest order! that hath him; the loss of him
Gnngren'd all orders here; all lost a limb 1
Never made body such haste to confess
What a soul was; all former comeliness 10

Fled in a minute, when the soul was gone,
And having lost that beauty would have none:
So fell our monasteries, in an instant grown
Not to less houses, but to heaps of stone;
So sent his body, that fair form it wore,
Unto the sphere of forms, and doth (before
His soul shall fill up his sepulchral stone)
Anticipate a resurrection: '' . '''"'

For as it is his fame, now his soul's here,
So in the form thereof bis body '3 there. • * ";j.j

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