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THE

ANNUAL BIOGRAPHY AND OBITUARY,

OF

1834.

PART 1.

MEMOIRS OF CELEBRATED PERSONS, WHO HAVE

DIED WITHIN THE YEARS 1833-1834.

No. 1.

REV. JOSEPH DRURY, D.D.

LATE HEAD MASTER OF HARROW.

So many of the nobility and gentry of our land, so large a proportion of those who are now distinguished in the senate, the pulpit, and the bar, are indebted for their early intellectual training to the lately deceased Joseph Drury, D.D., and he was so well known, during a large portion of his life, to persons eminent for taste and literature, that we should be justly chargeable with culpable negligence, were no biographical sketch of him to appear in these pages.

The subject of this memoir, although descended from one of the most ancient houses of our English gentry, was the exclusive architect of his own moderate fortunes; and had far more satisfaction in so considering himself, than in any pride of pedigree. It may be allowable, nevertheless, for a biographer to notice that about which he himself was somewhat indifferent.

The founder of the family in England was a Norman gentleman, who came over with the Conqueror, and whose

VOL. XIX.

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name is to be found in both the copies of the Battel Abbey Roll, between those of Durand and Dabittot. His settlement was fixed in the parish of Thurston, near Bury St. Edmunds. There his family continued, under the appellation derived from their locality, as John or Henry, &c. of Thurston, until the time when the Norman surnames had by degrees made their way into general use. In the beginning of the fifteenth century, Sir Roger Drury, the property of his house having very considerably advanced, by marriage and other causes, in its later generations, removed his family to Rougham, also near Bury; and there his descendants kept residence for more than two hundred years. As has often been the case with families of landed estate, the junior branches established houses of more fame than that which remained in possession of the patrimonial inheritance. Of these were the Drurys of Ickworth, in Suffolk, from whom the estate of Ickworth passed, by marriage, about the end of the sixteenth century, to the ancestor of the Marquis of Bristol, its present proprietor; and the Drurys of Hawsted, in the same county, whose settlement at Hawsted was of longer continuance, and who were, for several generations, connected with the court, and long represented the county of Suffolk in parliament. of this stock was Sir William Drury, governor of Ireland, who suppressed the rebellion of the Desmonds, in the south, in the time of Elizabeth ; and his cousin, Sir Drue Drury, who married a cousin of Queen Anne Boleyn, and who, being of the privy chamber of Elizabeth, was, conjointly with Sir Amias Paulet, intrusted with the custody of Mary Queen of Scots. He lived to the age of ninety-nine years. .

The Hawsted branch (who were, moreover, proprietors of Drury House, from which our present Drury Lane took its appellation,) ended in a female, who died unmarried, in the beginning of the seventeenth century, and whose well-known epitaph, by Donne, has conferred on her name a poetical immortality

.“ Her pure and eloquent blood Spoke in her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought, That one might almost say her body thought."

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